Becker Library Archives
9:00am - 5:00pm, M-F (or by appointment)
arb@wusm.wustl.edu/(314) 362-4236


Browse Collections By: Title Classification

Joseph Erlanger PapersAdd to your cart. | Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives

Title: Joseph Erlanger PapersAdd to your cart.
ID: FC/FC001
Extent: 21.5 Linear Feet
Predominant Dates: 1890-1964
expand icon Biographical/Historical Note

Joseph Erlanger (1874-1965) was born in San Francisco, studied at the University of California (B.S., 1895) and received his medical education at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore (M.D., 1899). He was an intern at the Johns Hopkins University Hospital under William Osler, 1899-1900. From 1900 to 1906, JE was an assistant in physiology at Johns Hopkins under William H. Howell. He became professor of physiology at the University of Wisconsin Medical School in 1906. In 1910, he accepted an appointment as professor and head of physiology at Washington University in St. Louis. JE retained this position until retirement in 1946, continuing in research at the university for several years afterward. In 1944, he and Herbert S. Gasser were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for … discoveries relating to the highly differentiated functions of nerve fibres.”

JE’s chief contributions to physiology can be divided into two distinct phases. Until 1921, he concentrated on problems relating to the cardiovascular system, developing an improved sphygmomanometer, and making important discoveries about the relation of blood pressure and the conduction of electrical impulses in the heart. The second phase of his research career began in collaboration with Gasser, a former student. The two adapted a cathode-ray oscillograph for the purpose of amplifying and recording electrical conduction, or action potentials, of the nervous system. Using this instrument, they analyzed and compared action potentials of different portions of the nervous system, determining that the speed of conduction is proportional to the diameter of the nerve fiber. JE’s later research built upon this key electrophysiological discovery, with studies of excitation and polarization of nerve fibers, among other investigations. Throughout his tenure at Washington University, JE played an important role in the governance of the medical school through its Executive Faculty council. He also made important contributions to the American Physiological Society and other scientific organizations.

expand icon Access and Use Restrictions
Restrictions: The collection is open and accessible for research.
Rights:

Users of the collection should read and abide by the Rights and Permissions guidelines at the Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives.

Users of the collection who wish to cite items from this collection, in whole or in part, in any form of publication must request, sign, and return a Statement of Use form to the Archives.

For detailed information regarding use of this collection, contact the Archives and Rare Book Department of the Becker Library (arb@wusm.wustl.edu).

Related Materials:
Preferred Citation: [Item description, Box number, Folder number], Joseph Erlanger Papers, Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives, Washington University School of Medicine.
Printer-friendly Printer-friendly | Full Finding Aid Full Finding Aid

BERNARD BECKER MEDICAL LIBRARY
660 S. Euclid Ave., Campus Box 8132, St. Louis MO 63110
Phone: 314.362.7080 Fax: 314.454.6606


©2017 Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
Powered by Archon


Page Generated in: 0.34 seconds (using 139 queries).
Using 10.64MB of memory. (Peak of 10.87MB.)

Powered by Archon Version 3.21
Copyright ©2011 The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign