Collection FC016 - Carl V. Moore Papers

Description

Reference code

FC016

Level of description

Collection

Title

Carl V. Moore Papers

Date(s)

  • 1932-1972 (Creation)

Extent

12.00 Linear Feet

Name of creator

(1908-1972)

Biographical history

Carl V. Moore was an internationally respected physician and blood expert. A St. Louis native, Moore was born on August 21, 1908, and earned his BA and MD from Washington University in 1928 and 1932 respectively. After graduation, Moore attained a National Research Council Fellowship in Medicine at Ohio State University. He served as assistant professor of medicine at that institution from 1935 until 1938, before returning to Washington University. Moore remained at the university for the rest of his career, becoming a full professor in 1946. Moore's research involved pioneering studies in iron metabolism and iron nutrition in collaboration with Washington University professors Virginia Minnich and Reubenia Dubach.

In addition to his research and teaching responsibilities, Moore also contributed to the administration of the Washington University School of Medicine. He served as dean of the School of Medicine from 1953 until 1955 and as head of the Department of Medicine from 1955 until his death. In 1964, Moore became the first Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs and first President of the School of Medicine, positions he held for a year. During this year, Moore successfully negotiated with Barnes Hospital and the School of Medicine to renew the affiliation between these two venerable institutions at a difficult time.

Moore's influence extended beyond St. Louis and Washington University. At various times, he headed the American Association of Physicians, American Society of Clinical Investigation, Central Society for Clinical Research, International Institute of Nutrition, and American Institute of Nutrition. He also worked on the editorial boards of the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, Blood, American Journal of Medicine, and Progress in Hematology. Moore's contributions to the medical field resulted in a number of awards and accolades, including the Abraham Flexner Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the Stratton Medal from the International Society of Hematology, and election to the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Moore died of a heart attack on August 13, 1972, while vacationing with his family in Michigan.

Scope and content

This collection contains mostly correspondence and other materials related to Moore’s involvement with various committees and professional societies.  In particular, this collection highlights Moore’s work on anemia, iron deficiency, and nutrition.

System of arrangement

Conditions governing access

The collection is open and accessible for research.

Technical access

Conditions governing reproduction

Users of the collection should read and abide by the Rights and Permissions guidelines at the Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives.

Users of the collection who wish to cite items from this collection, in whole or in part, in any form of publication must request, sign, and return a Statement of Use form to the Archives.

For detailed information regarding use of this collection, contact the Archives and Rare Book Department of the Becker Library (arb@wusm.wustl.edu).

Preferred Citation:

Item description, Reference Code, Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives, Washington University in St. Louis.

Languages of the material

  • English

Scripts of the material

  • Latin

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Rules or conventions

"Describing Archives: A Content Standard, Second Edition (DACS), 2013."

Sources used

Archivist's note

© Copyright 2019 Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives. All rights reserved.

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