Oral History

Taxonomy

Code

Scope note(s)

Source note(s)

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Oral History

Equivalent terms

Oral History

Associated terms

Oral History

153 Archival description results for Oral History

153 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

William D. Owens Oral History

  • OH091
  • Collection
  • July 20, 2006

Interviewed by Robert K. Stoelting in 2006. Approximate Length: 37 minutes.

Owens, William D.

Mabel L. Purkerson Oral History

  • OH035
  • Collection
  • September 25, 1978

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1978. Approximate Length: 72 minutes.

Purkerson, Mabel L.

Shirley Sahrmann Oral History

  • OH082
  • Collection
  • September 6, 2005

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 57 minutes.

Sahrmann, Shirley A.

Crawford F. Sams Oral History

  • OH037
  • Collection
  • 5/3/1979

Sams discusses his decision to pursue a medical degree at the Washington University School of Medicine, his interest in neurosurgery, and the influence of faculty member Ernest Sachs. He describes his research on heat syndrome while assigned to the Panama Canal Department and talks extensively about his work during the Second World War in the Middle East, Europe, and the Far East in preparing medical services for casualties. At the end of the Second World War Sams was made Chief of the Public Health and Welfare Section of the General Headquarters, Supreme Command Allied Powers and was responsible for the establishment of all activities pertaining to the health and welfare of the Japanese. Sams relates his contributions in the rebuilding Japan, including studying the effects of radiation after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, establishing mass immunization programs, improving medical care and education, and nutrition initiatives during this period. He also describes similar work he performed in Korea before, during and after the Korean War. Sams then discusses his research on low-level radiation at the Operations Research Center at the University of California-Berkeley, as well as the early efforts in the application of computer systems to biological research. The audio quality of the interview is inconsistent and at times very poor. There are several instances of unintelligible words or sentences. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 3, 1979. OH037. Approximate Length 112 minutes.

Sams, Crawford F.

Paul N. Saunders Oral History

  • OH110
  • Collection
  • June 12, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 64 minutes.

Saunders, Paul N.

Arnold E. Schaefer Oral History

  • OH048
  • Collection
  • 11/7/1980

Schaefer discusses his work with the Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense (ICNND) in the 1950s and 1960s, and the organization’s work in coordinating projects and studies in nutrition and assisting developing countries to address nutrition problems of both civilian populations and military personnel. He talks about his service as a nutrition officer during World War II, the beginnings of United States government interest in the nutrition of foreign nations, the nutrition office in the U.S. Army Office of the Surgeon General, and the formation of the ICNND following the Korean War. Several of Schaefer’s colleagues are discussed, including Frank B. Berry, Harold R. Sandstead, and John B. Youmans. Schaefer describes the cooperation between the ICNND and the U.S. Navy medical research units, how ICNND surveys yielded valuable clinical research data, and how the ICNND projects established laboratories and trained personnel in developing countries. Schaefer also discusses other international projects on nutrition, the Food for Peace (PL-480) program, domestic U.S. nutrition surveys, and rivalries between various U.S. government agencies (such as the United States Agency for International Development – USAID) concerned with nutrition. This oral history contains language (including obscenities) that could be interpreted as offensive to some users. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on November 7, 1980. OH048. Approximate Length 170 minutes.

Schaefer, Arnold E.

Dorothy Devendorf Thomas Oral History

  • OH127
  • Collection
  • May 25, 2007

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 37 minutes.

Thomas, Dorothy Devendorf

James Whittico Oral History

  • OH112
  • Collection
  • July 25, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 90 minutes.

Whittico, James M., Jr.

Norman C. Wolff, Jr. Oral History

  • OH114
  • Collection
  • 10/26/2006

Wolff shares his remembrances of his grandparents, Leonore and Max A. Goldstein. He discusses his grandfather’s career – the founding of the Central Institute for the Deaf and the scientific journal the Laryngoscope, and Goldstein’s travel and study in Europe. Noted are Goldstein’s penchant for collecting rare books, art, and Native American relics. Wolff provides details about the campus of CID and the history of its buildings and development. Also discussed are CID faculty and staff members such as Helen S. Lane, Julia M. Connery, Mildred A. McGinnis, Rafael Lorente de Nó, S. Richard Silverman, Hallowell Davis, and Jean Moog. Wolff also relates some of his memories of growing up in St. Louis in the 1930s and vacationing with his family in Frankfort, Michigan. CID Executive Director Robin Feder participates briefly in the interview. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on October 26, 2007. OH114. Approximate Length 157 minutes.

Wolff, Norman C. ("Tom"), Jr.

Agnes Zeigler Oral History

  • OH098
  • Collection
  • September 18, 2006

Interview for the School of Nursing Alumni.

Zeigler, Agnes

E. V. Cowdry Oral History (OH008)

  • OH008
  • Collection
  • January 15, 1970

Interviewed by Walter W. Walker in 1969. Approximate Length: 90 minutes.

Cowdry, E. V. (Edmund Vincent)

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH102)

  • OH102
  • Collection

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 49 minutes. Interviewers, Bill Geideman and James Carter.

Guze discusses his experience with segregation and desegregation of Barnes Hospital, Renard Hospital, its psychiatric service and unit. He guessed the psychiatric service desegregated the Barnes Hospital psychiatric unit in October 1953.

He and the interviewers had a clearer timeline for desegregation of admission of medical students to the Washington University School of Medicine. He said the executive faculty gave the admissions committee discretion in flexible criteria for admission for those with disadvantaged educational background. Roy Vagelos of Biochemistry was a key player on the Executive Faculty along with John Herweg, who headed the admissions committee starting in the early 1960s. Guze recalled that the first African American medical student (1953?) had difficulty and the second had no difficulty, but the executive faculty wanted more African Americans admitted and numbers did not start to go up significantly until about 1968. This was due to the hiring of Bob Lee, Dean of Minority Affairs, whose sole responsibility at first was minority students.

Guze discusses the parallel but related desegregation of the St. Louis City Hospital and health care systems. He notes that the segregated city healthcare system included two large general hospitals, Homer G. Phillips (St. Louis City Hospital no. 2) built in 1937 on the north side for African-Americans and older St. Louis City Hospital (no. 1 or Max Starkloff) for whites on the south side. He said there was one psychiatric unit at the Malcolm Bliss Center for whites and a separate psychiatric unit for blacks run by black psychiatrists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. And he recalled that there was a long-standing formal teaching arrangement with 'Max Starkloff or St. Louis City Hospital no. 1 in several services on the south side including psychiatry, medicine, surgery, infectious disease unit, laboratory and isolation unit. But he noted the teaching arrangement with Homer G. Phillips Hospital was less complete and depended on personal relationships in each Service. For example the teaching arrangement with the Surgery Service at Homer G. Phillips was more complete because of the efforts of Robert Elman of the Surgery Department at Washington University School of Medicine to have regular teaching rounds at Homer G. Phillips. Guze notes that desegregation of both facilities led the city to evaluate whether the city needed two large general hospital complexes. A group of black physicians approached Guze in the 1970s about an affiliation, but Guze insisted on conditions that Homer G. Phillips was not prepared to meet then including the right to appoint medical staff.

Guze, Samuel B.

David Goldring Oral History

  • OH101
  • Collection
  • July 20, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 19 minutes.

David Goldrings relates stories he heard and his own experience with the admission of black children to St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

He begins with stories he heard about the attitude of chiefs of pediatrics, hospital administrators, and hospital board toward the admission of black children to children’s Hospital. John Howland was the first chief of pediatrics at the Hospital and he left to go to Johns Hopkins Hospital after 6 months because the Hospital board was opposed to the admission of black children to the hospital. This situation changed when St. Louis Children's Hospital opened the Butler Ward, a black only ward in 1923.

David Goldring’s own experience began with his internship and residency in 1941-1944. One night, a black child needed an incubator and there was none in the Butler ward. So David Goldring admitted him to the infant ward. Estelle Claiborne told David Goldring that this was the sort of thing that got interns fired and reported it to Alexis Hartmann Sr., his chief of pediatrics by a phone call. She was quite angry that Hartmann let the admission stand, but integration did not happen frequently in the war years.

Integration of the staff of St. Louis Children's Hospital began with the Nash family. Helen Nash joined the medical staff in 1949 and Homer Nash in 1955. For years before, Park J. White was committed to the training of African American interns and residents as an attending physician for 25 years at Homer G. Phillips. David Goldring and Neil Middlecamp were aso attendings in pediatrics at Homer G. Phillips Hospital for about 10 years.

Goldring, David

Park J. White Oral History

  • OH036
  • Collection
  • 1/29/1979

White discusses his decision to come to St. Louis Children’s Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine in 1920, and his interaction with Williams McKim Marriott. He describes the medical ethics course he taught for over twenty years. White shares his views on fee-splitting, abortion and birth control, euthanasia, women in medicine, malpractice insurance, and answers a question about his involvement in the integration of the Academy of Pediatrics in the 1940’s. The discussion covers White’s medical practice and treatment of disadvantaged children and the prevalence of lead-poisoning in that population. The interview concludes with White reciting one of his poems. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on January 29, 1979. OH036. Approximate Length 60 minutes.

White, Park J.

Jessie L. Ternberg Oral History

  • OH034
  • Collection
  • May 8, 1978

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1978. Approximate Length: 2 hours and 40 minutes.

Ternberg, Jessie L.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH090)

  • OH090
  • Collection
  • April 27, 2006

Landau discusses his experiences working with the Washington University School of Medicine's Program in Physical Therapy.
Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 14 minutes.  See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau, William M.

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • OH026
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1976

The three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 24, 1976. OH026. Approximate Length 87 minutes.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

William C. Banton Oral History

  • OH099
  • Collection
  • July 5, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes.

Banton, William C., II

Results 21 to 40 of 153