Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

153 Archival description results for Oral History

153 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Julian C. Mosley, Jr. Oral History

  • OH109
  • Collection
  • July 6, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 57 minutes.

Mosley, Julian C., Jr.

Julaine Florence Oral History

  • OH133
  • Collection
  • 2010-03-02

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM.

Florence, Julaine

Joye Baumann Oral History

  • OH088
  • Collection
  • July 21, 2006

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 36 minutes.

Baumann, Joye

Joseph Erlanger Oral History

  • OH045
  • Collection
  • January 1964

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman and  Margaret Erlanger in 1964. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Erlanger, Joseph

John D. Davidson Oral History

  • OH032
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1977

Davidson discusses his experiences as a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine, his internship at St. Louis City Hospital, and his fellowship in Cardiology at the National Heart Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, which involved the study of hypertension. Davidson discusses research at St. Luke’s Hospital on treatments to decrease the amount of heart damage after a heart attack. Davidson also discusses changes in medical education from the late 1940s/early 1950s to the mid-1970s, and medical malpractice insurance and Medicaid problems facing physicians in the 1970s. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 13, 1977. OH032. Approximate Length 62 minutes.

Davidson, John D.

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH104)

  • OH104
  • Collection
  • June 29, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 44 minutes.

Herweg, John C.

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH103)

  • OH103
  • Collection
  • June 13, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 45 minutes.

Herweg, John C.

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH079)

  • OH079
  • Collection
  • March 2005

Candace O'Connor conducted the interview with John Herweg as part of her research in the history of the St. Louis Children’s Hospital for the hospital’s 125th anniversary publication. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 53 minutes.

O'Connor asked John Herweg to discuss his experiences at St. Louis Children's Hospital during the Alexis Hartmann era, 1936-early 1960s. As a medical student at Washington University in 1942-1945. he found the milieu at Children's Hospital was exciting, almost magical, because the medical and nursing staff were early adopters of each new antibiotic. Diagnosis was key in cures of children with meningitis and mastoiditis, who could be cured if caught in time. The pediatrician in-chief Alexis Hartmann Sr. and Jean Valjean cook provided guidance to the medical students in their sophomore, junior and senior years to save children’s lives.

Herwig reviews his experience as a student, intern, and resident of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of thrilling teachers such as Hartmann Sr. and Zebatine Hybias???? [Zentay?}. They knew medicine not only the laboratory aspects but clinical aspects. Hartmann brought patients and their mothers to the amphitheatre as well as the clinic where students saw clinical practice demonstrated. Herwig also rubbed shoulders with outstanding people who were research scientists besides the five research scientists, who were or were about to be Nobel Laureates including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, and Dr. Hershey in Bacterioiogy.

Hartmann insisted that Herweg stay for his internship and residency. Herwig was one of the bright medical students that Hartman recruited into pediatrics and nutured along. He helped them rise.

He mentions his first wife, Janet Scovill, who had finished her pediatric residency at Children’s (Which Children’s ) before him. [She died in 1958.} He also speaks of his present wife Dottie Glahn, who was head nurse of the infant ward at St. Louis Children’s Hospital from 1947-1959.

The interviewer asked him his recollections of Mrs. Langenberg, Gracie Jones and other women on women on the Board of Children’s hospital. He also briefly discussed interactions with Estelle Claiborne, the hospital administrator.

He recalls that World War II’s major effect on St. Louis Children’s Hospital was reduction of the number of house officers. The residents who were in charge of the hospital during the nighttime hours were consequently overworked.

The budget was very stringent at the end of the war. For example there were 2 glass syringes and they had to be autoclaved before use and they were in constant use. The staff cooled Patients were co by blowing a fan over a 50 pound cake of ice to make up for a lack of air conditioning.

Concerning the Butler Ward, the segregated ward for African-Americans, he admits the house officers might have integrated Children's Hospital earlier. He thought integration came about when Dave Golden called up Hartmann later and said he wanted to put an African patient on a ward by treatment needed rather than in the Butler ward. Hartmann agreed and Herwig thought that was the beginning of integration of St. Louis Chidlren's Hospital.

As to whether Hartmann sr. was prejudiced, Herweg didn't think so. He said Hartmann sr. had good relations with Helen and Homer Nash and later Alison Nash, Homer's daughter, at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. But he notes that Hartman wasn't an activist like Park White. He then recalls his impressions of Park White who he also admired.

Herweg, John C.

John A. Pierce Oral History

  • OH014
  • Collection
  • 4/3/1974

Pierce discusses the career of his colleague Alfred Goldman, a 1920 graduate of the Washington University School of Medicine and, for fifty years, a member of the clinical faculty of the school. Pierce describes some of Goldman’s early research on the effect of chilling on the development of upper respiratory disease, the physiology of hyperventilation, and tetany. Goldman’s great skill working and relating to both his patients and with students is described. Pierce comments on Goldman’s careful scholarship and tenacity as a researcher as well as his dedication to his family and to his patients. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on April 3, 1974. OH014. Approximate Length 32 minutes.

Pierce, John A.

Jessie L. Ternberg Oral History

  • OH034
  • Collection
  • May 8, 1978

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1978. Approximate Length: 2 hours and 40 minutes.

Ternberg, Jessie L.

Jerome S. Levy Oral History

  • OH017
  • Collection
  • 5/16/1975

Levy describes his family and educational background in Arkansas, his experiences as a student at Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and professors there such as Ernie Sachs. Levy recounts the accomplishments of some of his fellow students in the medical school class of 1925. Levy also discusses his philosophy on treating patients, his 50-plus years of practicing gastroenterology, and his service during World War II. The audio quality of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 16, 1975. OH017. Approximate Length 40 minutes.

Levy, Jerome S.

Jerome R. Cox, A. Maynard Engebretson, V. W. "Bill" Gerth, and Bruce J. Walz Oral History

  • OH128
  • Collection
  • August 21, 2008

Group interview recorded August 21, 2008 commenting on two films: “SPEAR – PC Radiation Treatment Planning (external beams and implants)" dated March 6, 1967, and “This is the P.C.” Biomedical Computer Laboratory, dated May 17, 1971. Commentary and video were synchronized and recorded to a DVD and deposited in RG035 Accession 2010-019.

Cox, Jerome R., Jr.

Jerome R. Cox Oral History

  • OH080
  • Collection
  • 6/7/2006

Cox comments on influential colleagues such as Harold Edgerton, Leo Beranek, Hallowell Davis, Michel Ter-Pogossian, Charles Molnar, Wesley A. Clark. He discusses his early work at CID, establishment and work of the Biomedical Computer Laboratory (BCL) and Computer Research Laboratory (CRL) at Washington University, and developments in biomedical computing, PET scanning, and computer technology applications.Interviewed by Simon Igielnik on June 7, 2006. OH080. Approximate Length by 167 minutes.

Cox, Jerome R., Jr.

Jerome E. Cook Oral History

  • OH063
  • Collection
  • 4/8/1961

Cook talks about Dr. Jesse S. Myer, gastroenterologist and biographer of William Beaumont. Cook also relates some of his experiences as a medical student in the early years of the 20th century and as an intern at St. Louis City Hospital. He describes the practice of medicine at that time and the prevalence and treatment of diseases such as typhoid fever, malaria, and syphilis.

There are several long pauses in the audio recording. Interviewed on April 8, 1961. OH063. Approximate Length 41 minutes.

Cook, Jerome E.

Jennifer Stith Oral History

  • OH140
  • Collection
  • 2010-03-01

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM.

Jean Matthews Oral History

  • OH120
  • Collection
  • March 19, 2007

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 32 minutes.

Matthews, Jean

Janet Prior Oral History

  • OH125
  • Collection
  • May 25, 2007

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 40 minutes.

Prior, Janet

Results 61 to 80 of 153