Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

153 Archival description results for Oral History

153 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Anne Stewart Spitzmiller Oral History

  • OH123
  • Collection
  • May 10, 2007

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 34 minutes.

Spitzmiller, Anne Stewart

Jennifer Stith Oral History

  • OH140
  • Collection
  • 2010-03-01

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM.

Donna Vickery Oral History

  • OH117
  • Collection
  • December 21, 2006

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 16 minutes.

Vickery, Donna

Thomas A. Woolsey Oral History

  • OH058
  • Collection
  • February 8, 2016

This interview, recorded over two days, covers Woolsey's time as a medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine from 1965 to 1969 and as a faculty member of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1971 to 2016. OH058

Woolsey, Thomas A.

George H. Bishop Oral History

  • OH004
  • Collection
  • 11/24/1969

Bishop discusses his collaboration with Drs. Joseph Erlanger and Herbert Spencer Gasser on the properties of nerve fibers as recorded on the oscilloscope in the early 1920s at the Washington University School of Medicine. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on November 24, 1969. OH004. Approximate Length 10 minutes.

Bishop, George H.

Robert E. Shank Oral History

  • OH044
  • Collection
  • 6/27/1980

Shank discusses his student years at the Washington University School of Medicine and his research with Dr. David Barr; his research at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research during World War II; and his postwar research at the Public Health Research Institute for the City of New York. The conversation then focuses on the major research focus of Shank’s career – nutritional studies. Shank relates his experiences conducting nutritional study research in Newfoundland; the study of nutrition during war and the necessity of providing proper nutrition to troops; public health surveys conducted overseas under the auspices of the Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense (ICNND); and his experiences as participant and consultant to the Public Health Service and the Indian Health Service. Shank comments on the challenge of improving nutrition standards in developing countries with steadily increasing populations and the role of the National Research Council and the Food Nutrition Board in the development of standards of recommended dietary allowances of nutrients. He also discusses the growth of the vitamin industry, nutrition in prepared and baby foods, and obesity. The discussion then covers the development of the WUSM Department of Preventive Medicine while Shank was its head – the Irene Walter Johnson Institute of Rehabilitation, the Medical Care Group under its initial director Gerald Perkoff, the division of biostatistics, Health Care Research, applied physiology, epidemiology, and lipid research. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on June 27, 1980. OH044. Approximate Length 130 minutes.

Shank, Robert E.

Joseph Erlanger Oral History

  • OH045
  • Collection
  • January 1964

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman and  Margaret Erlanger in 1964. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Erlanger, Joseph

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH065)

  • OH065
  • Collection
  • October 11, 1989

Interviewed by Richard W. Hudgens in 1989.

This is a five part interview on the history of the Neuropsychiatry department and the psychiatry department of Washington University School of Medicine. Part 1 begins with questions on the neuropsychiatry department in World War II beginning with Edward Gildea. He was a proponent of biological psychiatry, but was tolerant of the psychoanalysts on staff like his wife Margaret Gildea. Guze discusses the dynamic between the biologically oriented faculty Gildea appointed such as George Saslow, Eli Robins and George Winokur and himself. He also mentions George Ulett and David Graham. Guze explains how he got into psychiatry, when his initial goal was to be an internist. He also describes in the end of part 1 and beginning of part 2 how in 1955, Guze, Robins and Winokur, the three assistant professor in Psychiatry in 1955 went to Gildea with their plan for a biologically oriented psychiatry department. Gildea was supportive and they divided up duties. In the training of students, biological psychiatry emphasizes diagnosis and research, clinical studies of etiology including neuropathology, pharmacology, and neurochemistry. Eli Robins was the prime mover in the movement on regularizing diagnostic criteria. At the end of part 2, Guze discusses Gildeas strengths and weaknesses and is asked about Gildea's conflict with James O'Leary. Guze is asked how Eli Robins became head of the new Psychiatry Department. Dr. Ulett was also a contender for department chair. in part 3, Guze discusses Robins era and the effect of Eli's multiple sclerosis on his own research and the psychiatry department. In part 5, Guze discusses how he met Joy Guze, his wife and his childhood especially parents and grandparents and schooling. Antisemitic quotas affected admission to medical schools particularly before World War II.

Guze, Samuel B.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH066)

  • OH066
  • Collection
  • 1994

Guze discusses his experience as a student of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of faculty members such as Carl and Gerty Cori, Mildred Trotter, Ethel Ronzoni Bishop, Joseph Erlanger, Barry Wood, Evarts A. Graham, Helen Tredway Graham, Sarah Luse, and Carl Moore. Guze explains how his interest in the field of psychiatry developed and the influence of George Saslow on his career. He also discusses building the psychiatry program at Washington University with his colleagues Eli Robins and George Winokur, his work on the genetics of psychiatric disorders, and the interest and development of child psychiatry as a discipline within the medical school. Colleagues such as M. Kenton King. Virginia Weldon, Paula J. Clayton, Lee Robins, and James Anthony are discussed. This oral history consists of a series of seven interviews conducted in 1994. The interviews were transcribed and edited by the interviewer, Marion Hunt, in 1994. The transcription was corrected and annotated by the interviewee in 1995. Interviewed by Marion Hunt in 1994. OH066. Approximate Length 49 leaves.

Guze, Samuel B.

Bernard Becker Oral History

  • OH061
  • Collection
  • 10/19/1990

Transcript of 3 interviews with Bernard Becker conducted in the fall of 1990. In the first interview Becker describes his early years and education. He discusses his undergraduate studies at Princeton University and his mentor there, H. S. Taylor; his graduate studies at Harvard Medical School during World War II and his military service as a psychiatrist; and his post-war residency training and research with Jonas Friedenwald at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. In the second interview Becker describes the challenges of balancing clinical work, research, and administration as head of the Department of Ophthalmology at Washington University School of Medicine from 1953 to 1988. Becker discusses the expansion of the Department of Ophthalmology, his research in the causes and control of glaucoma, and his efforts to integrate the university’s affiliated hospitals. In the third interview, Becker describes the changes in academic medicine and research from the 1950s to the 1980s. He discusses some of the efforts leading to the establishment of the National Eye Institute in 1968, and his work to fund and construct a new medical library at Washington University. Following the 3rd interview is Dr. Becker's summary of his career. Interviewed by Marion Hunt on October 19, 1990; November 2, 1990, and unknown date [Fall 1990]. OH061. Approximate Length 30 leaves.

Becker, Bernard

Robert J. Glaser Oral History

  • OH062
  • Collection
  • 3/7/1985

Robert Glaser discusses his undergraduate and medical school experiences at Harvard University and his residency and years on the faculty as assistant and associate dean of the Washington University School of Medicine. Glaser explains his research in the uses of penicillin and his work in the rheumatic fever clinic during the late 1940s and 1950s. He also discusses some of his colleagues at Washington University, including Barry Wood, Robert A. Moore, Evarts A. Graham, and Carl Moore. Glaser discusses his experience serving as dean of the medical schools at Colorado and Stanford universities, and his work as a foundation executive of the Commonwealth Fund, the Kaiser Foundation and the Markey Charitable Trust. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on March 7, 1985. OH062. Approximate Length 130 minutes.

Glaser, Robert J.

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH103)

  • OH103
  • Collection
  • June 13, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 45 minutes.

Herweg, John C.

Ruth Silberberg Oral History

  • OH020
  • Collection
  • 1/16/1976

Silberberg discusses differences in medical education in Europe and the United States. She also discusses changes in the field of pathology in general and in the Department of Pathology at the Washington University School of Medicine over the course of her career. Changes due to the development of electron microscopy are recalled, as well as the difficulties Silberberg encountered working under dean of the medical school and head of the pathology department, Robert A. Moore. Silberberg talks of leaving Germany because of the rise of Nazism and her husband and her coming to St. Louis to work in with Leo Loeb. She also describes her research in growth and aging, the study of osteoarthritis, and the relation of diabetes and joint disease. Sound level of audio recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on January 16, 1976. OH020. Approximate Length 53 minutes.

Silberberg, Ruth

Herbert A. Anderson Oral History

  • OH022
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Anderson discusses his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and some of his instructors, including Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs. Anderson also details his experiences as senior medical officer on a hospital transport ship during World War II and his continuing study of abdominal surgery at the Allgemeine Krankenhaus at the University of Vienna. Interviewed by Darryl B. Podoll on May 13 , 1976. OH022. Approximate Length 41 minutes.

Anderson, Herbert A., Jr.

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • OH033
  • Collection
  • 5/17/1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care. Audio quality of interview is poor. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 17, 1977. OH033. Approximate Length 32 minutes.

Stewart, Frances H.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH107)

  • OH107
  • Collection
  • June 15, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey, James Carter, and William Guideman, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes. See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau discusses his experience with segregation in St. Louis as a child and as medical student, house officer, and resident at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine as background to the desegregation of hospitals and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He recalls the desegregation of Barnes Hospital was set in motion by David Goldring, Alexis Hartman Sr. and ? Park White trained African American pediatricians through his world class pediatric residency program at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in the 1940s. Park White also fought get black kids into St. Louis Children's Hospital and his own African American residents as medical staff. Landau recalls the first black medical student's admission in 1951 and his failure due in part to poor preparation but more significantly to a hostile environment. George Saslow, a psychiatrist and head of the outpatient clinic, was key in building a better environment for subsequent black applicants and students.

Landau, William M.

Arthur E. Strauss Oral History

  • OH076
  • Collection
  • 9/18/1959

Strauss begins by discussing otolaryngologist Hanau W. Loeb and his role in the early history of St. Louis University Medical School and the development of Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. While relating being called in to help treat Loeb, Strauss discusses his training as a cardiologist and describes the first electrocardiograms. He relates his experiences leading up to his service in World War I and his experiences during the war working as a cardiologist in England and France. Strauss recalls returning to St. Louis after the war and his subsequent work as head of the cardiac clinic at Washington University and at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Strauss talks about his interactions with several prominent early physicians and cardiologists, including Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and James McKenzie. The conversation returns to the discussion of Hanau Loeb, and Strauss reads a published tribute to Loeb written by prominent St. Louis rabbi Leon Harrison. Strauss recalls two men who influenced him in his career as a physician, Jesse S. Myer and Albert E. Taussig. The interviewers and Strauss then talk about generational changes in medical training and practice, including the lack of exposure to medical “greats” and the lack of respect shown by local hospital house staffs. Some of the audio recording is distorted (at approximately 71 minutes in); the volume of the recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Gerhard E. Gruenfeld and Barrett L. Taussig on September 18, 1959. OH076. Approximate Length 147 minutes.

Strauss, Arthur E.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • OH043
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH043. Approximate length 63 minutes.

Drews, Robert C.

Harry Agress Oral History

  • OH054
  • Collection
  • 4/22/1982

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 22, 1982. OH054. Approximate Length: 93 minutes.

Agress, Harry

Joye Baumann Oral History

  • OH088
  • Collection
  • July 21, 2006

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 36 minutes.

Baumann, Joye

Results 101 to 120 of 153