Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

152 Archival description results for Oral History

152 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Suzy Cornbleet Oral History

  • OH146
  • Collection
  • March 21, 2012

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger, Director of the Program in Physical Therapy, WUSM.

Anthony Delitto Oral History

  • OH143
  • Collection
  • February 23, 2012

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger, Director of the Program in Physical Therapy, WUSM.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • OH043
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH043. Approximate length 63 minutes.

Drews, Robert C.

Joseph Erlanger Oral History

  • OH045
  • Collection
  • January 1964

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman and  Margaret Erlanger in 1964. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Erlanger, Joseph

Lee Fetter Oral History

  • OH119
  • Collection
  • March 15, 2007

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 41 minutes.

Fetter, Lee

Robert J. Glaser Oral History

  • OH062
  • Collection
  • 3/7/1985

Robert Glaser discusses his undergraduate and medical school experiences at Harvard University and his residency and years on the faculty as assistant and associate dean of the Washington University School of Medicine. Glaser explains his research in the uses of penicillin and his work in the rheumatic fever clinic during the late 1940s and 1950s. He also discusses some of his colleagues at Washington University, including Barry Wood, Robert A. Moore, Evarts A. Graham, and Carl Moore. Glaser discusses his experience serving as dean of the medical schools at Colorado and Stanford universities, and his work as a foundation executive of the Commonwealth Fund, the Kaiser Foundation and the Markey Charitable Trust. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on March 7, 1985. OH062. Approximate Length 130 minutes.

Glaser, Robert J.

Edwin D. Greer Oral History

  • OH024
  • Collection
  • 7/14/1976

Greer discusses his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine after his service in the Navy Medical Corps in World War I, and some of his influential teachers, such as Philip Shaffer. Greer talks of his experiences establishing his medical practice in Oakland, California, his hobby of music, and his patient-oriented approach to medicine. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 14, 1976. OH024. Approximate Length 50 minutes.

Greer, Edwin D.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH065)

  • OH065
  • Collection
  • October 11, 1989

Interviewed by Richard W. Hudgens in 1989.

This is a five part interview on the history of the Neuropsychiatry department and the psychiatry department of Washington University School of Medicine. Part 1 begins with questions on the neuropsychiatry department in World War II beginning with Edward Gildea. He was a proponent of biological psychiatry, but was tolerant of the psychoanalysts on staff like his wife Margaret Gildea. Guze discusses the dynamic between the biologically oriented faculty Gildea appointed such as George Saslow, Eli Robins and George Winokur and himself. He also mentions George Ulett and David Graham. Guze explains how he got into psychiatry, when his initial goal was to be an internist. He also describes in the end of part 1 and beginning of part 2 how in 1955, Guze, Robins and Winokur, the three assistant professor in Psychiatry in 1955 went to Gildea with their plan for a biologically oriented psychiatry department. Gildea was supportive and they divided up duties. In the training of students, biological psychiatry emphasizes diagnosis and research, clinical studies of etiology including neuropathology, pharmacology, and neurochemistry. Eli Robins was the prime mover in the movement on regularizing diagnostic criteria. At the end of part 2, Guze discusses Gildeas strengths and weaknesses and is asked about Gildea's conflict with James O'Leary. Guze is asked how Eli Robins became head of the new Psychiatry Department. Dr. Ulett was also a contender for department chair. in part 3, Guze discusses Robins era and the effect of Eli's multiple sclerosis on his own research and the psychiatry department. In part 5, Guze discusses how he met Joy Guze, his wife and his childhood especially parents and grandparents and schooling. Antisemitic quotas affected admission to medical schools particularly before World War II.

Guze, Samuel B.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH066)

  • OH066
  • Collection
  • 1994

Guze discusses his experience as a student of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of faculty members such as Carl and Gerty Cori, Mildred Trotter, Ethel Ronzoni Bishop, Joseph Erlanger, Barry Wood, Evarts A. Graham, Helen Tredway Graham, Sarah Luse, and Carl Moore. Guze explains how his interest in the field of psychiatry developed and the influence of George Saslow on his career. He also discusses building the psychiatry program at Washington University with his colleagues Eli Robins and George Winokur, his work on the genetics of psychiatric disorders, and the interest and development of child psychiatry as a discipline within the medical school. Colleagues such as M. Kenton King. Virginia Weldon, Paula J. Clayton, Lee Robins, and James Anthony are discussed. This oral history consists of a series of seven interviews conducted in 1994. The interviews were transcribed and edited by the interviewer, Marion Hunt, in 1994. The transcription was corrected and annotated by the interviewee in 1995. Interviewed by Marion Hunt in 1994. OH066. Approximate Length 49 leaves.

Guze, Samuel B.

Viktor Hamburger Oral History

  • OH067
  • Collection
  • 6/30/1983

Viktor Hamburger discusses major points in his long career as an embryologist – his early work in Germany with Hans Spemann and the study of the organizer effect; his experience coming to the United States in 1932 as a Rockefeller fellow and staying on after Hitler’s “cleansing of the professions” in Germany; joining the faculty of Washington University and his research there. Hamburger talks about his colleagues such as Rita Levi-Montalcini and their discovery of naturally occurring neuronal death, his work with Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen on the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF), and his study of animal behavior development and motility. Interviewed by Dale Purves, M.D. on June 30, 1983. OH067. Approximate Length 80 minutes.

Hamburger, Viktor

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH103)

  • OH103
  • Collection
  • June 13, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 45 minutes.

Herweg, John C.

Beckett Howorth Oral History

  • OH016
  • Collection
  • 5/16/1975

Howorth discusses his family’s background and growing up in Mississippi and his medical education experiences. Howorth recalls his orthopedic training with Dr. Russell Hibbs at the New York Orthopedic Hospital; his research, publications and teaching in orthopedics; his move to southwestern Connecticut in 1949 and subsequent career in Greenwich; and his involvement with national and international professional organizations. Audio quality of interview is poor. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 16, 1975. OH016. Approximate Length 85 minutes.

Howorth, Beckett

David E. Kennell Oral History

  • OH005
  • Collection
  • 11/25/1969

Kennell recounts the participation of the St. Louis Doctors for Peace in the nationwide Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam held on October 15, 1969 at the Washington University School of Medicine. The audio quality of the last 40 seconds of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on November 25, 1969. OH005. Approximate Length 18 minutes.

Kennell, David E.

Robert C. Kolodny Oral History

  • OH057
  • Collection
  • November 21, 2013

The interview concerns Kolodny's experiences as a medical student at the Washington University School of Medicine from 1965 until his graduation in 1969. He speaks of the realities of diversity and integration at the medical school at that time. He also talks about his experience with fellow students in creating a course on medical ethics. Faculty members specifically mentioned include Virginia Minnich and Sarah Luse. The interview was recorded on November 21, 2013. Approximate length is 58 minutes. OH057

Kolodny, Robert C.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH107)

  • OH107
  • Collection
  • June 15, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey, James Carter, and William Guideman, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes. See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau discusses his experience with segregation in St. Louis as a child and as medical student, house officer, and resident at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine as background to the desegregation of hospitals and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He recalls the desegregation of Barnes Hospital was set in motion by David Goldring, Alexis Hartman Sr. and ? Park White trained African American pediatricians through his world class pediatric residency program at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in the 1940s. Park White also fought get black kids into St. Louis Children's Hospital and his own African American residents as medical staff. Landau recalls the first black medical student's admission in 1951 and his failure due in part to poor preparation but more significantly to a hostile environment. George Saslow, a psychiatrist and head of the outpatient clinic, was key in building a better environment for subsequent black applicants and students.

Landau, William M.

Ruth Silberberg Oral History

  • OH020
  • Collection
  • 1/16/1976

Silberberg discusses differences in medical education in Europe and the United States. She also discusses changes in the field of pathology in general and in the Department of Pathology at the Washington University School of Medicine over the course of her career. Changes due to the development of electron microscopy are recalled, as well as the difficulties Silberberg encountered working under dean of the medical school and head of the pathology department, Robert A. Moore. Silberberg talks of leaving Germany because of the rise of Nazism and her husband and her coming to St. Louis to work in with Leo Loeb. She also describes her research in growth and aging, the study of osteoarthritis, and the relation of diabetes and joint disease. Sound level of audio recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on January 16, 1976. OH020. Approximate Length 53 minutes.

Silberberg, Ruth

Oliver H. Lowry Oral History

  • OH012
  • Collection
  • 6/16/1972

Lowry discusses the life and work of Helen Tredway Graham, a member of the department of pharmacology of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1925-1971. Lowry discusses their work together studying histamines. The audio quality of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on June 16, 1972. OH012. Approximate Length 7 minutes.

Lowry, Oliver H.

Debbie McDonnell Oral History

  • OH134
  • Collection
  • 2011-03-15

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM.

McDonnell, Debbie

Virginia Minnich Oral History

  • OH029
  • Collection
  • 3/25/1981

Minnich discusses her undergraduate studies at Ohio State University and her graduate studies at Iowa State College. She describes research work in college on serum iron metabolism, done with Carl V. Moore, and his later offer of employment as a researcher at the Washington University School of Medicine in 1938. Minnich details some of her research on iron metabolism, anemias and purpura, as well as her work setting up laboratories in Thailand and Turkey. She also discusses her work creating audio-visual teaching aids, teaching evening classes, and changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over her 40-plus year career. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on March 25, 1981. OH029. Approximate Length 77 minutes.

Minnich, Virginia

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