Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

153 Archival description results for Oral History

153 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

William S. Dock Oral History

  • OH053
  • Collection
  • 10/5/1981

Dock discusses his preclinical education in medical school in the late 1910s at Washington University School of Medicine and early research with cathode ray oscilloscopes. He talks about his father, George Dock, who was professor of medicine (1910-1922) and dean (1910-1912) of the WUSM, and the differences in medical education in his father’s and his generations. Dock discusses his impressions of members of the WUSM faculty, including Joseph Erlanger, Robert J. Terry, and Eugene Opie. He also relates some of his experiences as a pathology professor at several medical schools. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on October 5, 1981. OH053. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Dock, William S.

William Peck Oral History

  • OH115
  • Collection
  • October 18, 2006

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 39 minutes.

Peck, William A. (William Arno)

William M. Landau Oral History (OH107)

  • OH107
  • Collection
  • June 15, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey, James Carter, and William Guideman, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes. See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau discusses his experience with segregation in St. Louis as a child and as medical student, house officer, and resident at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine as background to the desegregation of hospitals and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He recalls the desegregation of Barnes Hospital was set in motion by David Goldring, Alexis Hartman Sr. and ? Park White trained African American pediatricians through his world class pediatric residency program at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in the 1940s. Park White also fought get black kids into St. Louis Children's Hospital and his own African American residents as medical staff. Landau recalls the first black medical student's admission in 1951 and his failure due in part to poor preparation but more significantly to a hostile environment. George Saslow, a psychiatrist and head of the outpatient clinic, was key in building a better environment for subsequent black applicants and students.

Landau, William M.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH090)

  • OH090
  • Collection
  • April 27, 2006

Landau discusses his experiences working with the Washington University School of Medicine's Program in Physical Therapy.
Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 14 minutes.  See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau, William M.

William H. Danforth Oral History

  • OH122
  • Collection
  • April 24, 2007

Interviewed by Sondra Schlesinger in 2007. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 40 minutes.

Danforth, William H. (William Henry)

William D. Owens Oral History

  • OH091
  • Collection
  • July 20, 2006

Interviewed by Robert K. Stoelting in 2006. Approximate Length: 37 minutes.

Owens, William D.

William C. Banton Oral History

  • OH099
  • Collection
  • July 5, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes.

Banton, William C., II

William B. Parker Oral History

  • OH021
  • Collection
  • 2/17/1976; 2/24/1976; 3/2/1976

In a series of three interviews, Parker relates some of the history of the Washington University School of Medicine and its administrative staff, operation and structure. He mentions the deans under which he served and names several of the members of the secretarial and support staff with who he worked over the years. The audio quality of the interview is inconsistent and there is intermittent background noise. There are several long pauses between questions and during some of the answers. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on February 17, February 24, and March 2, 1976. OH021. Approximate Length 72 minutes.

Parker, William B.

Walter R. Peterson Oral History

  • OH025
  • Collection
  • 5/14/1976

Peterson tells of some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and faculty members such as Evarts A. Graham. He describes his internships and residencies in St. Louis and New York City, his practice as an orthopedic surgeon in Trenton, New Jersey, and his position as a clinical instructor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Peterson also discusses some of the changes in the practice of orthopedic surgery over the course of his career, the impact of malpractice insurance, and his philosophy of practicing medicine. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 14, 1976. OH025. Approximate Length 37 minutes.

Peterson, Walter R.

Virginia Minnich Oral History

  • OH029
  • Collection
  • 3/25/1981

Minnich discusses her undergraduate studies at Ohio State University and her graduate studies at Iowa State College. She describes research work in college on serum iron metabolism, done with Carl V. Moore, and his later offer of employment as a researcher at the Washington University School of Medicine in 1938. Minnich details some of her research on iron metabolism, anemias and purpura, as well as her work setting up laboratories in Thailand and Turkey. She also discusses her work creating audio-visual teaching aids, teaching evening classes, and changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over her 40-plus year career. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on March 25, 1981. OH029. Approximate Length 77 minutes.

Minnich, Virginia

Viktor Hamburger Oral History

  • OH067
  • Collection
  • 6/30/1983

Viktor Hamburger discusses major points in his long career as an embryologist – his early work in Germany with Hans Spemann and the study of the organizer effect; his experience coming to the United States in 1932 as a Rockefeller fellow and staying on after Hitler’s “cleansing of the professions” in Germany; joining the faculty of Washington University and his research there. Hamburger talks about his colleagues such as Rita Levi-Montalcini and their discovery of naturally occurring neuronal death, his work with Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen on the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF), and his study of animal behavior development and motility. Interviewed by Dale Purves, M.D. on June 30, 1983. OH067. Approximate Length 80 minutes.

Hamburger, Viktor

Tom F. Whayne Oral History

  • OH051
  • Collection
  • 5/7/1981

Whayne shares memories of his experiences at Washington University School of Medicine and teachers such as David P. Barr and Evarts A. Graham. He discusses his impressions as an intern at Missouri Baptist Hospital and as a resident at Missouri Pacific Hospital and his experiences in the Reserve Officers Corps at a Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Missouri. Whayne relates how he joined the Army Medical Corps during the Depression, and his assignments during the 1930s at Fitzsimmons General Hospital, Carlisle Barracks, and in Panama. The development of Whayne’s interest in tropical medicine, preventive medicine, and nutrition during the Second World War is covered. Whayne discusses colleagues such as Crawford Sams, Stanhope Bayne-Jones, and James Stevens Simmons. He also talks of his contribution to the U.S. Army Medical Department’s clinical series, Preventive Medicine in World War II. The interview concludes with a discussion about the meaning of the terms preventive medicine, public health, community medicine and family medicine, and Whayne’s experiences in academic medicine after his retirement from the military. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 7, 1981. OH051. Approximate Length 137 minutes.

Whayne, Tom F. (Tom French)

Thomas A. Woolsey Oral History

  • OH058
  • Collection
  • February 8, 2016

This interview, recorded over two days, covers Woolsey's time as a medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine from 1965 to 1969 and as a faculty member of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1971 to 2016. OH058

Woolsey, Thomas A.

Sven Eliasson Oral History

  • OH086
  • Collection
  • April 18, 2006

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 32 minutes.

Eliasson, Sven G.

Suzy Cornbleet Oral History

  • OH146
  • Collection
  • March 21, 2012

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger, Director of the Program in Physical Therapy, WUSM.

Shirley Sahrmann Oral History

  • OH082
  • Collection
  • September 6, 2005

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 57 minutes.

Sahrmann, Shirley A.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH102)

  • OH102
  • Collection

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 49 minutes. Interviewers, Bill Geideman and James Carter.

Guze discusses his experience with segregation and desegregation of Barnes Hospital, Renard Hospital, its psychiatric service and unit. He guessed the psychiatric service desegregated the Barnes Hospital psychiatric unit in October 1953.

He and the interviewers had a clearer timeline for desegregation of admission of medical students to the Washington University School of Medicine. He said the executive faculty gave the admissions committee discretion in flexible criteria for admission for those with disadvantaged educational background. Roy Vagelos of Biochemistry was a key player on the Executive Faculty along with John Herweg, who headed the admissions committee starting in the early 1960s. Guze recalled that the first African American medical student (1953?) had difficulty and the second had no difficulty, but the executive faculty wanted more African Americans admitted and numbers did not start to go up significantly until about 1968. This was due to the hiring of Bob Lee, Dean of Minority Affairs, whose sole responsibility at first was minority students.

Guze discusses the parallel but related desegregation of the St. Louis City Hospital and health care systems. He notes that the segregated city healthcare system included two large general hospitals, Homer G. Phillips (St. Louis City Hospital no. 2) built in 1937 on the north side for African-Americans and older St. Louis City Hospital (no. 1 or Max Starkloff) for whites on the south side. He said there was one psychiatric unit at the Malcolm Bliss Center for whites and a separate psychiatric unit for blacks run by black psychiatrists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. And he recalled that there was a long-standing formal teaching arrangement with 'Max Starkloff or St. Louis City Hospital no. 1 in several services on the south side including psychiatry, medicine, surgery, infectious disease unit, laboratory and isolation unit. But he noted the teaching arrangement with Homer G. Phillips Hospital was less complete and depended on personal relationships in each Service. For example the teaching arrangement with the Surgery Service at Homer G. Phillips was more complete because of the efforts of Robert Elman of the Surgery Department at Washington University School of Medicine to have regular teaching rounds at Homer G. Phillips. Guze notes that desegregation of both facilities led the city to evaluate whether the city needed two large general hospital complexes. A group of black physicians approached Guze in the 1970s about an affiliation, but Guze insisted on conditions that Homer G. Phillips was not prepared to meet then including the right to appoint medical staff.

Guze, Samuel B.

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