Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

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Oral History

153 Archival description results for Oral History

153 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Elizabeth Simonds Oral History

  • OH096
  • Collection
  • September 18, 2006

Interview for the School of Nursing Alumni.

Simonds, Elizabeth ("Betty") J. Garrett

Helen Wells Stevenson and Lucy Stevenson Oral History

  • OH075
  • Collection
  • 4/21/1983

Helen Wells Stevenson and Lucy Stevenson discuss the life and career of Paul H. Stevenson (1890-1971). Stevenson received his B.S. degree from Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio in 1913 and his medical degree from Washington University School of Medicine in 1916. His widow and sister relate stories about Stevenson’s career as an anatomist and anthropologist at the Peking Union Medical College, where he worked in the 1920s and 1930s under the auspices of the Rockefeller Foundation and the China Medical Board. They also discuss Stevenson’s work and interaction with prominent colleagues, such as Davidson Black and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin and Swedish explorer Sven Hedin. Stevenson’s experiences in Burma and India during World War II, as part of the United States Public Health Service, is covered. Helen Stevenson describes her husband’s interest in public health issues, especially those concerning mental illness and alcoholism, and his work as a consultant after the war in those areas. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 21 and July 18, 1983. OH075. Approximate Length 98 minutes.

Stevenson, Helen Wells

Clark Tibbits Oral History

  • OH060
  • Collection

Interviewed by Margaret Cowdry Hahn in 1984. Both recording and transcript are missing.

Helen Wells Oral History

  • OH097
  • Collection
  • September 19, 2006

Interview for the School of Nursing Alumni.

Wells, Helen

Tom F. Whayne Oral History

  • OH051
  • Collection
  • 5/7/1981

Whayne shares memories of his experiences at Washington University School of Medicine and teachers such as David P. Barr and Evarts A. Graham. He discusses his impressions as an intern at Missouri Baptist Hospital and as a resident at Missouri Pacific Hospital and his experiences in the Reserve Officers Corps at a Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Missouri. Whayne relates how he joined the Army Medical Corps during the Depression, and his assignments during the 1930s at Fitzsimmons General Hospital, Carlisle Barracks, and in Panama. The development of Whayne’s interest in tropical medicine, preventive medicine, and nutrition during the Second World War is covered. Whayne discusses colleagues such as Crawford Sams, Stanhope Bayne-Jones, and James Stevens Simmons. He also talks of his contribution to the U.S. Army Medical Department’s clinical series, Preventive Medicine in World War II. The interview concludes with a discussion about the meaning of the terms preventive medicine, public health, community medicine and family medicine, and Whayne’s experiences in academic medicine after his retirement from the military. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 7, 1981. OH051. Approximate Length 137 minutes.

Whayne, Tom F. (Tom French)

Mildred Trotter Oral History (OH009)

  • OH009
  • Collection
  • 5/19/1972

Trotter discusses her interest in anatomy and the events leading her to joining the faculty of the Washington University School of Medicine department of Anatomy. She recounts several events in the history of the department and its heads over the years, including Robert J. Terry, Edmund V. Cowdry, and Edward Dempsey. Trotter describes serving as an anthropologist in Hawaii identifying skeletal remains after the Second World War, changes in the study and teaching of anatomy, and teaching for a year at Makerere University College in Kampala, Uganda. She also discusses changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over the course of her career as well as sex discrimination in salaries and promotion at the university. The transcript combines two conversations between Mildred Trotter and Estelle Brodman recorded in May, 1972. The transcript was edited in 1985 by Paul G. Anderson to present events of Dr. Trotter's life in chronological order. Emendations of Dr. Trotter's remarks are indicated by words or passages enclosed in brackets. The audio quality of the original sound recording is poor. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 19, 1972 and May 23, 1972. OH009. Approximate Length 37 leaves (40 minutes.)

Trotter, Mildred, 1899-1991

Virginia Minnich Oral History

  • OH029
  • Collection
  • 3/25/1981

Minnich discusses her undergraduate studies at Ohio State University and her graduate studies at Iowa State College. She describes research work in college on serum iron metabolism, done with Carl V. Moore, and his later offer of employment as a researcher at the Washington University School of Medicine in 1938. Minnich details some of her research on iron metabolism, anemias and purpura, as well as her work setting up laboratories in Thailand and Turkey. She also discusses her work creating audio-visual teaching aids, teaching evening classes, and changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over her 40-plus year career. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on March 25, 1981. OH029. Approximate Length 77 minutes.

Minnich, Virginia

Brent M. Parker Oral History

  • OH031
  • Collection
  • 5/12/1977

Parker relates some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine, and some of the memorable faculty members, such as W. Barry Wood. Parker also discusses changes in medical school education over the years, medical malpractice insurance, Medicare, and euthanasia. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 12, 1977. OH031. Approximate Length 40 minutes.

Parker, Brent M.

M. Kenton King Oral History

  • OH069
  • Collection
  • November 1991

Interviewed by Marion Hunt in 1991.

King, M. Kenton (Morris Kenton)

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH079)

  • OH079
  • Collection
  • March 2005

Candace O'Connor conducted the interview with John Herweg as part of her research in the history of the St. Louis Children’s Hospital for the hospital’s 125th anniversary publication. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 53 minutes.

O'Connor asked John Herweg to discuss his experiences at St. Louis Children's Hospital during the Alexis Hartmann era, 1936-early 1960s. As a medical student at Washington University in 1942-1945. he found the milieu at Children's Hospital was exciting, almost magical, because the medical and nursing staff were early adopters of each new antibiotic. Diagnosis was key in cures of children with meningitis and mastoiditis, who could be cured if caught in time. The pediatrician in-chief Alexis Hartmann Sr. and Jean Valjean cook provided guidance to the medical students in their sophomore, junior and senior years to save children’s lives.

Herwig reviews his experience as a student, intern, and resident of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of thrilling teachers such as Hartmann Sr. and Zebatine Hybias???? [Zentay?}. They knew medicine not only the laboratory aspects but clinical aspects. Hartmann brought patients and their mothers to the amphitheatre as well as the clinic where students saw clinical practice demonstrated. Herwig also rubbed shoulders with outstanding people who were research scientists besides the five research scientists, who were or were about to be Nobel Laureates including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, and Dr. Hershey in Bacterioiogy.

Hartmann insisted that Herweg stay for his internship and residency. Herwig was one of the bright medical students that Hartman recruited into pediatrics and nutured along. He helped them rise.

He mentions his first wife, Janet Scovill, who had finished her pediatric residency at Children’s (Which Children’s ) before him. [She died in 1958.} He also speaks of his present wife Dottie Glahn, who was head nurse of the infant ward at St. Louis Children’s Hospital from 1947-1959.

The interviewer asked him his recollections of Mrs. Langenberg, Gracie Jones and other women on women on the Board of Children’s hospital. He also briefly discussed interactions with Estelle Claiborne, the hospital administrator.

He recalls that World War II’s major effect on St. Louis Children’s Hospital was reduction of the number of house officers. The residents who were in charge of the hospital during the nighttime hours were consequently overworked.

The budget was very stringent at the end of the war. For example there were 2 glass syringes and they had to be autoclaved before use and they were in constant use. The staff cooled Patients were co by blowing a fan over a 50 pound cake of ice to make up for a lack of air conditioning.

Concerning the Butler Ward, the segregated ward for African-Americans, he admits the house officers might have integrated Children's Hospital earlier. He thought integration came about when Dave Golden called up Hartmann later and said he wanted to put an African patient on a ward by treatment needed rather than in the Butler ward. Hartmann agreed and Herwig thought that was the beginning of integration of St. Louis Chidlren's Hospital.

As to whether Hartmann sr. was prejudiced, Herweg didn't think so. He said Hartmann sr. had good relations with Helen and Homer Nash and later Alison Nash, Homer's daughter, at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. But he notes that Hartman wasn't an activist like Park White. He then recalls his impressions of Park White who he also admired.

Herweg, John C.

Hallowell Davis Oral History

  • OH027
  • Collection
  • 4/6/1977

These interviews begin with Davis’s studies at Harvard and his post-graduate study in England. Davis discusses his research on the electrophysiology of the auditory system and electrical activity of the brain and his defense work during World War II studying human tolerance to loud sounds. Davis describes the establishment of a research department at the Central Institute for the Deaf and work on hearing tests and speech audiometry, including the development of the first American standards for audiometers. Davis describes then-current methods in electro-physiology to measure peripheral hearing of young children by detecting electrical responses in the brain. The interview ends with a brief discussion of the problems related to world overpopulation, pollution, and international relations.

The transcript presents an edited version of the sound recording. The interview begins with a biographical sketch of Hallowell Davis, and ends with a revised biographical sketch. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on April 6, 1977 and April 28, 1977. OH027. Approximate Length 2 hours, 45 minutes.

Davis, Hallowell, 1896-1992

Jerome E. Cook Oral History

  • OH063
  • Collection
  • 4/8/1961

Cook talks about Dr. Jesse S. Myer, gastroenterologist and biographer of William Beaumont. Cook also relates some of his experiences as a medical student in the early years of the 20th century and as an intern at St. Louis City Hospital. He describes the practice of medicine at that time and the prevalence and treatment of diseases such as typhoid fever, malaria, and syphilis.

There are several long pauses in the audio recording. Interviewed on April 8, 1961. OH063. Approximate Length 41 minutes.

Cook, Jerome E.

John D. Davidson Oral History

  • OH032
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1977

Davidson discusses his experiences as a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine, his internship at St. Louis City Hospital, and his fellowship in Cardiology at the National Heart Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, which involved the study of hypertension. Davidson discusses research at St. Luke’s Hospital on treatments to decrease the amount of heart damage after a heart attack. Davidson also discusses changes in medical education from the late 1940s/early 1950s to the mid-1970s, and medical malpractice insurance and Medicaid problems facing physicians in the 1970s. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 13, 1977. OH032. Approximate Length 62 minutes.

Davidson, John D.

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