Collection RG040 - Renard Hospital Records

Description

Reference code

RG040

Level of description

Collection

Title

Renard Hospital Records

Date(s)

Extent

1.00 Linear Feet

Name of creator

(1955-)

Administrative history

The Renard Hospital, located on the Washington University medical campus, was built on behalf of Wallace Renard of Renard Linoleum and Rug Company in St. Louis. Mr. Renard bequeathed $600,000 for the establishment of a neuropsychiatric hospital upon his death in 1951. It was with this initial donation, alongside funds from the State of Missouri under the Hill-Burton Act, which allowed construction to begin in fall of 1952. The facility was designed to have 100 beds plus classrooms, patient interview rooms, examination rooms, office spaces, and recreational spaces for patients, such as a rooftop sun deck.

The hospital’s cornerstone was laid on November 3, 1953 and construction was completed in 1955. The final cost was $1,580,000 and the building was dedicated on October 10, 1955 in conjunction with a lecture series on several topics in the field of psychiatry. The first patients to the hospital had been admitted on September 1, 1955. Previously, psychiatric patients seen at the Washington University School of Medicine were treated on two floors of McMillan Hospital, also located on the medical campus. Upon its dedication, the Renard Hospital was overseen by the Barnes Hospital Board of Trustees and functioned as the Psychiatric Unit of the Washington University and Barnes Hospital complex.

In February 1956, the Child Evaluation Clinic opened within the Renard Hospital, specializing in issues related to child psychiatry. 1962 brought about major renovations to both Renard and the neighboring Rand Johnson Memorial Surgical Wing; the Renard Hospital was granted funds for a seventh-floor addition by the United States Public Health Service. The space was dedicated to laboratory facilities and was connected by covered bridge to the Wohl Clinic Building.

As a result of the rapidly improving standards for psychiatric care, the Renard Hospital lost its function as the central psychiatric patient treatment facility when the West Pavilion of Barnes Hospital was constructed in 1979. The new addition to Washington University’s primary teaching hospital boasted state-of-the-art facilities for psychiatric care, and the outdated patient sections of the Renard Hospital building were converted to office space.

Scope and content

Please note that this finding aid is not complete.

System of arrangement

Conditions governing access

This collection is restricted from public use until the year 2050.

Technical access

Conditions governing reproduction

Users of the collection should read and abide by the Rights and Permissions guidelines at the Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives.

Users of the collection who wish to cite items from this collection, in whole or in part, in any form of publication must request, sign, and return a Statement of Use form to the Archives.

For detailed information regarding use of this collection, contact the Archives and Rare Book Department of the Becker Library (arb@wusm.wustl.edu).

Preferred Citation:

Item description, Reference Code, Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives, Washington University in St. Louis.

Languages of the material

  • English

Scripts of the material

  • Latin

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"Describing Archives: A Content Standard, Second Edition (DACS), 2013."

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Archivist's note

© Copyright 2019 Bernard Becker Medical Library Archives. All rights reserved.

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