Print preview Close

Showing 55 results

Archival description
Print preview View:

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • FC123
  • Collection
  • 1976

In this oral history, the three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • OH026
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1976

The three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 24, 1976. OH026. Approximate Length 87 minutes.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

In his oral history interview, Jones discusses some of his experiences as a medical officer during World War I. He also recalls some of the changes he witnessed over the years in the field of neurology and at the Washington University School of Medicine. Jones recalls some of his colleagues, such as Vilray P. Blair, George Dock, Ernest Sachs, and Sidney Schwab.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes. Grace Jones (Mrs. Andrew B. Jones) was also present and spoke during the interview.

Jones, Andrew B.

Arthur E. Strauss Oral History

  • OH076
  • Collection
  • 9/18/1959

Strauss begins by discussing otolaryngologist Hanau W. Loeb and his role in the early history of St. Louis University Medical School and the development of Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. While relating being called in to help treat Loeb, Strauss discusses his training as a cardiologist and describes the first electrocardiograms. He relates his experiences leading up to his service in World War I and his experiences during the war working as a cardiologist in England and France. Strauss recalls returning to St. Louis after the war and his subsequent work as head of the cardiac clinic at Washington University and at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Strauss talks about his interactions with several prominent early physicians and cardiologists, including Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and James McKenzie. The conversation returns to the discussion of Hanau Loeb, and Strauss reads a published tribute to Loeb written by prominent St. Louis rabbi Leon Harrison. Strauss recalls two men who influenced him in his career as a physician, Jesse S. Myer and Albert E. Taussig. The interviewers and Strauss then talk about generational changes in medical training and practice, including the lack of exposure to medical “greats” and the lack of respect shown by local hospital house staffs. Some of the audio recording is distorted (at approximately 71 minutes in); the volume of the recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Gerhard E. Gruenfeld and Barrett L. Taussig on September 18, 1959. OH076. Approximate Length 147 minutes.

Strauss, Arthur E.

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • OH047
  • Collection
  • 10/17/1980

Arthur Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on October 17, 1980. OH047. Approximate Length 39 minutes.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • FC126
  • Collection

Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Bernard Becker Oral History

  • OH061
  • Collection
  • 10/19/1990

Transcript of 3 interviews with Bernard Becker conducted in the fall of 1990. In the first interview Becker describes his early years and education. He discusses his undergraduate studies at Princeton University and his mentor there, H. S. Taylor; his graduate studies at Harvard Medical School during World War II and his military service as a psychiatrist; and his post-war residency training and research with Jonas Friedenwald at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. In the second interview Becker describes the challenges of balancing clinical work, research, and administration as head of the Department of Ophthalmology at Washington University School of Medicine from 1953 to 1988. Becker discusses the expansion of the Department of Ophthalmology, his research in the causes and control of glaucoma, and his efforts to integrate the university’s affiliated hospitals. In the third interview, Becker describes the changes in academic medicine and research from the 1950s to the 1980s. He discusses some of the efforts leading to the establishment of the National Eye Institute in 1968, and his work to fund and construct a new medical library at Washington University. Following the 3rd interview is Dr. Becker's summary of his career. Interviewed by Marion Hunt on October 19, 1990; November 2, 1990, and unknown date [Fall 1990]. OH061. Approximate Length 30 leaves.

Becker, Bernard

Brent M. Parker Oral History

  • OH031
  • Collection
  • 5/12/1977

Parker relates some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine, and some of the memorable faculty members, such as W. Barry Wood. Parker also discusses changes in medical school education over the years, medical malpractice insurance, Medicare, and euthanasia. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 12, 1977. OH031. Approximate Length 40 minutes.

Parker, Brent M.

Carl F. Cori Oral History

  • OH056
  • Collection
  • 10/18/1982

Cori recounts his education in Trieste and Prague and his service as a medic in World War I. He describes his early research in pharmacology in Europe and then his and his wife’s emigration to the U.S. when Cori accepted a position as chief biochemist at the State Institute for the Study of Malignant Disease in Buffalo, New York in 1922. The interview covers Cori’s acceptance of the position of head of the Department of Pharmacology at the Washington University School of Medicine in 1931, his gradual shift to the Department of Biochemistry and winning the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine with his wife and Bernardo Houssay in 1947. Cori discusses several of his colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine, including Leo Loeb, Joseph Erlanger, Evarts A. Graham, Robert J. Terry, Oliver Lowry, and W. McKim Marriott.

The audio quality of the interview is inconsistent. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on October 18, 1982. OH056. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Cori, Carl F.

Carl F. Cori Papers

  • FC050
  • Collection
  • 1919-1984

This collection is comprised mostly of Dr. Cori's personal and professional correspondence, although a few series contain materials relating to his research.

Cori, Carl F.

David Goldring Oral History

  • OH101
  • Collection
  • July 20, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 19 minutes.

David Goldrings relates stories he heard and his own experience with the admission of black children to St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

He begins with stories he heard about the attitude of chiefs of pediatrics, hospital administrators, and hospital board toward the admission of black children to children’s Hospital. John Howland was the first chief of pediatrics at the Hospital and he left to go to Johns Hopkins Hospital after 6 months because the Hospital board was opposed to the admission of black children to the hospital. This situation changed when St. Louis Children's Hospital opened the Butler Ward, a black only ward in 1923.

David Goldring’s own experience began with his internship and residency in 1941-1944. One night, a black child needed an incubator and there was none in the Butler ward. So David Goldring admitted him to the infant ward. Estelle Claiborne told David Goldring that this was the sort of thing that got interns fired and reported it to Alexis Hartmann Sr., his chief of pediatrics by a phone call. She was quite angry that Hartmann let the admission stand, but integration did not happen frequently in the war years.

Integration of the staff of St. Louis Children's Hospital began with the Nash family. Helen Nash joined the medical staff in 1949 and Homer Nash in 1955. For years before, Park J. White was committed to the training of African American interns and residents as an attending physician for 25 years at Homer G. Phillips. David Goldring and Neil Middlecamp were aso attendings in pediatrics at Homer G. Phillips Hospital for about 10 years.

Goldring, David

Ethan A. H. Shepley Oral History

  • OH003
  • Collection
  • 10/23/1969

Shepley recounts the reorganization of the Washington University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals into WUMSAH (Washington University Medical School and Affiliated Hospitals). He discusses the conflict between the School of Medicine and the board of Barnes Hospitals, and the roles of the individuals involved in the formation of WUMSAH, including Edgar M. Queeny, Edward W. Dempsey, James S. McDonnell, and William H. Danforth. The audio quality of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on October 23, 1969. OH003. Approximate Length 30 minutes.

Shepley, Ethan A. H.

Ethan A. Shepley Oral History

  • FC130
  • Collection
  • 1969

Shepley recounts the reorganization of the Washington University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals into WUMSAH (Washington University Medical School and Affiliated Hospitals). He discusses the conflict between the School of Medicine and the board of Barnes Hospitals, and the roles of the individuals involved in the formation of WUMSAH, including Edgar M. Queeny, Edward W. Dempsey, James S. McDonnell, and William H. Danforth.

Shepley, Ethan A. H.

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • OH033
  • Collection
  • 5/17/1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care. Audio quality of interview is poor. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 17, 1977. OH033. Approximate Length 32 minutes.

Stewart, Frances H.

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • FC131
  • Collection
  • 1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care.

Stewart, Frances H.

Gerald T. Perkoff Oral History

  • FC127
  • Collection

Perkoff describes his accelerated educational experience at Washington University during World War II and his decision to accept an internship at the University of Utah. He discusses his early research in metabolic and hereditary diseases at the University of Utah, where he was on the faculty and chief of the medical service of the Veterans Administration Hospital. Perkoff relates his returning to St. Louis, his efforts at St. Louis City Hospital to establish a full-time Department of Medicine, and the founding of the Division of Health Care Research at the Washington University School of Medicine. There is an extended discussion of the establishment of a health maintenance organization at Washington University, the Medical Care Group, its structure, financial structure and goals, and its role in training physicians. Perkoff also discusses the delivery of health care in rural settings, his predictions for the development of allied health personnel programs, and the future of medical care delivery.

Perkoff, Gerald T.

Gerald T. Perkoff Oral History

  • OH013
  • Collection
  • 1/8/1974

Perkoff describes his accelerated educational experience at Washington University during World War II and his decision to accept an internship at the University of Utah. He discusses his early research in metabolic and hereditary diseases at the University of Utah, where he was on the faculty and chief of the medical service of the Veterans Administration Hospital. Perkoff relates his returning to St. Louis, his efforts at St. Louis City Hospital to establish a full-time Department of Medicine, and the founding of the Division of Health Care Research at the Washington University School of Medicine. There is an extended discussion of the establishment of a health maintenance organization at Washington University, the Medical Care Group, its structure, financial structure and goals, and its role in training physicians. Perkoff also discusses the delivery of health care in rural settings, his predictions for the development of allied health personnel programs, and the future of medical care delivery. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on January 8, 1974. OH013. Approximate Length 85 minutes.

Perkoff, Gerald T.

H. Rommel Hildreth Oral History

  • FC134
  • Collection
  • 8 April 1981

Hildreth discusses the dispute between the Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital in the early 1960s, and the roles of Edgar M. Queeny (chairman of the Trustees of Barnes Hospital), Edward W. Dempsey (dean of the medical school), consultants Joseph Hinsey and John H. Knowles, and Washington University chancellor George Pake. Hildreth also talks about some of the faculty of the medical school while he was a student in the mid-1920s, such as Evarts A. Graham and Joseph Erlanger.

Hildreth, H. Rommel

H. Rommel Hildreth Oral History

  • OH030
  • Collection
  • 4/8/1981

Hildreth discusses the dispute between the Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital in the early 1960s, and the roles of Edgar M. Queeny (chairman of the Trustees of Barnes Hospital), Edward W. Dempsey (dean of the medical school), consultants Joseph Hinsey and John H. Knowles, and Washington University chancellor George Pake. Hildreth also talks about some of the faculty of the medical school while he was a student in the mid-1920s, such as Evarts A. Graham and Joseph Erlanger.  Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on April 8, 1981. OH030. Approximate Length 53 minutes.

Hildreth, H. Rommel

Results 1 to 20 of 55