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Mildred Trotter Papers

  • FC029
  • Collection

The Mildred Trotter papers group consists of fourteen series. The Trotter papers are rich in information not only about her fields of expertise, but about the School of Medicine in general and about opportunities for women in medical science during the first half of the twentieth century. Users are advised to consult Series 1 first, since it contains narrative memoirs that may serve to place her accomplishments in contexts of her own choosing.

Trotter, Mildred, 1899-1991

Carl F. Cori Papers

  • FC050
  • Collection
  • 1919-1984

This collection is comprised mostly of Dr. Cori's personal and professional correspondence, although a few series contain materials relating to his research.

Cori, Carl F.

Jacob G. Probstein Papers

  • FC060
  • Collection
  • 1920-1979

The Jacob G. Probstein papers include short transcripts of at least two oral history interviews with Probstein on Jewish Hospital (1977), Probstein's short histories of the pancreatitis research group: "Sam Gray/ Michael Somogyi/ May Fund and Pancreatis"(1979), and two letters from Helen Graham about Evarts A. Graham(1965-1968). The Jacob G. Probstein reprints, 1924-1970 are the bulk of the material. The focus of the oral histories are Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, its chiefs of surgery, its patients (the Jewish community), its donors, the role of nurses and nurse administrators, Dr. Michael Somogyi and the pancreatitis and diabetes research group, the clinics, and early operative techniques in the old Delmar location of the hospital.

Probstein, J. G. (Jacob G.)

Samuel B. Guze Papers

  • FC065
  • Collection
  • 1946-2000

The Samuel B. Guze Papers are arranged in eleven organizational series. The bulk of this large collection is contained in Series 3 (General Files) and Series 5 (Manuscripts). Included in the Guze Papers are letters, journal articles, and handwritten notes. However, a significant portion of the collection consists of drafts of articles that Dr. Guze and his colleagues compiled for publication, as well as the corresponding data collection documents used for research and analysis. Especially noteworthy in the Guze Papers are the two oral histories taken with Dr. Guze, as well as his personal diary located in Series 10. For more detailed information regarding the content of this collection, see the individual series descriptions and container lists.

Guze, Samuel B.

Lauren V. Ackerman Papers

  • FC114
  • Collection
  • 1990-1993

Autobiographical memoir (1990), article about Ackerman (1992); memorial service program (1993).

Ackerman, Lauren V.

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • FC123
  • Collection
  • 1976

In this oral history, the three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

John D. Davidson Oral History

  • FC124
  • Collection

Davidson discusses his experiences as a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine, his internship at St. Louis City Hospital, and his fellowship in Cardiology at the National Heart Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, which involved the study of hypertension. Davidson discusses research at St. Luke’s Hospital on treatments to decrease the amount of heart damage after a heart attack. Davidson also discusses changes in medical education from the late 1940s/early 1950s to the mid-1970s, and medical malpractice insurance and Medicaid problems facing physicians in the 1970s.

Davidson, John D.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • FC125
  • Collection

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine.

Drews, Robert C.

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • FC126
  • Collection

Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Gerald T. Perkoff Oral History

  • FC127
  • Collection

Perkoff describes his accelerated educational experience at Washington University during World War II and his decision to accept an internship at the University of Utah. He discusses his early research in metabolic and hereditary diseases at the University of Utah, where he was on the faculty and chief of the medical service of the Veterans Administration Hospital. Perkoff relates his returning to St. Louis, his efforts at St. Louis City Hospital to establish a full-time Department of Medicine, and the founding of the Division of Health Care Research at the Washington University School of Medicine. There is an extended discussion of the establishment of a health maintenance organization at Washington University, the Medical Care Group, its structure, financial structure and goals, and its role in training physicians. Perkoff also discusses the delivery of health care in rural settings, his predictions for the development of allied health personnel programs, and the future of medical care delivery.

Perkoff, Gerald T.

John A. Pierce Oral History

  • FC128
  • Collection

Pierce discusses the career of his colleague Alfred Goldman, a 1920 graduate of the Washington University School of Medicine and, for fifty years, a member of the clinical faculty of the school. Pierce describes some of Goldman’s early research on the effect of chilling on the development of upper respiratory disease, the physiology of hyperventilation, and tetany. Goldman’s great skill working and relating to both his patients and with students is described. Pierce comments on Goldman’s careful scholarship and tenacity as a researcher as well as his dedication to his family and to his patients.

Pierce, John A.

Ethan A. Shepley Oral History

  • FC130
  • Collection
  • 1969

Shepley recounts the reorganization of the Washington University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals into WUMSAH (Washington University Medical School and Affiliated Hospitals). He discusses the conflict between the School of Medicine and the board of Barnes Hospitals, and the roles of the individuals involved in the formation of WUMSAH, including Edgar M. Queeny, Edward W. Dempsey, James S. McDonnell, and William H. Danforth.

Shepley, Ethan A. H.

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • FC131
  • Collection
  • 1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care.

Stewart, Frances H.

Viktor Hamburger Oral History

  • FC132
  • Collection
  • June 30, 1983

Hamburger discusses major points in his long career as an embryologist – his early work in Germany with Hans Spemann and the study of the organizer effect; his experience coming to the United States in 1932 as a Rockefeller fellow and staying on after Hitler’s “cleansing of the professions” in Germany; joining the faculty of Washington University and his research there. Hamburger talks about his colleagues such as Rita Levi-Montalcini and their discovery of naturally occurring neuronal death, his work with Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen on the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF), and his study of animal behavior development and motility.

Hamburger, Viktor

Harry Agress Oral History

  • FC133
  • Collection

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis.

Agress, Harry

H. Rommel Hildreth Oral History

  • FC134
  • Collection
  • 8 April 1981

Hildreth discusses the dispute between the Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital in the early 1960s, and the roles of Edgar M. Queeny (chairman of the Trustees of Barnes Hospital), Edward W. Dempsey (dean of the medical school), consultants Joseph Hinsey and John H. Knowles, and Washington University chancellor George Pake. Hildreth also talks about some of the faculty of the medical school while he was a student in the mid-1920s, such as Evarts A. Graham and Joseph Erlanger.

Hildreth, H. Rommel

Ethan A. H. Shepley Oral History

  • OH003
  • Collection
  • 10/23/1969

Shepley recounts the reorganization of the Washington University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals into WUMSAH (Washington University Medical School and Affiliated Hospitals). He discusses the conflict between the School of Medicine and the board of Barnes Hospitals, and the roles of the individuals involved in the formation of WUMSAH, including Edgar M. Queeny, Edward W. Dempsey, James S. McDonnell, and William H. Danforth. The audio quality of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on October 23, 1969. OH003. Approximate Length 30 minutes.

Shepley, Ethan A. H.

Mildred Trotter Oral History (OH009)

  • OH009
  • Collection
  • 5/19/1972

Trotter discusses her interest in anatomy and the events leading her to joining the faculty of the Washington University School of Medicine department of Anatomy. She recounts several events in the history of the department and its heads over the years, including Robert J. Terry, Edmund V. Cowdry, and Edward Dempsey. Trotter describes serving as an anthropologist in Hawaii identifying skeletal remains after the Second World War, changes in the study and teaching of anatomy, and teaching for a year at Makerere University College in Kampala, Uganda. She also discusses changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over the course of her career as well as sex discrimination in salaries and promotion at the university. The transcript combines two conversations between Mildred Trotter and Estelle Brodman recorded in May, 1972. The transcript was edited in 1985 by Paul G. Anderson to present events of Dr. Trotter's life in chronological order. Emendations of Dr. Trotter's remarks are indicated by words or passages enclosed in brackets. The audio quality of the original sound recording is poor. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 19, 1972 and May 23, 1972. OH009. Approximate Length 37 leaves (40 minutes.)

Trotter, Mildred, 1899-1991

Lee D. Cady Oral History

  • OH011
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1972

Cady recounts some of the history of the 21st General Hospital and its service during World War II in Africa, Italy and France.

This interview covers material which already exists in book form in the Washington University School of Medicine Archives. Because of the poor quality of the tape from which the interview was transcribed, this version is probably not be the best source for information on Dr. Cady’s service as commanding officer of the 21st General Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 24, 1972. OH011. Approximate Length 85 minutes.

Cady, Lee D.

Gerald T. Perkoff Oral History

  • OH013
  • Collection
  • 1/8/1974

Perkoff describes his accelerated educational experience at Washington University during World War II and his decision to accept an internship at the University of Utah. He discusses his early research in metabolic and hereditary diseases at the University of Utah, where he was on the faculty and chief of the medical service of the Veterans Administration Hospital. Perkoff relates his returning to St. Louis, his efforts at St. Louis City Hospital to establish a full-time Department of Medicine, and the founding of the Division of Health Care Research at the Washington University School of Medicine. There is an extended discussion of the establishment of a health maintenance organization at Washington University, the Medical Care Group, its structure, financial structure and goals, and its role in training physicians. Perkoff also discusses the delivery of health care in rural settings, his predictions for the development of allied health personnel programs, and the future of medical care delivery. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on January 8, 1974. OH013. Approximate Length 85 minutes.

Perkoff, Gerald T.

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