Print preview Close

Showing 7 results

Archival description
Homer G. Phillips Hospital
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH102)

  • OH102
  • Collection

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 49 minutes. Interviewers, Bill Geideman and James Carter.

Guze discusses his experience with segregation and desegregation of Barnes Hospital, Renard Hospital, its psychiatric service and unit. He guessed the psychiatric service desegregated the Barnes Hospital psychiatric unit in October 1953.

He and the interviewers had a clearer timeline for desegregation of admission of medical students to the Washington University School of Medicine. He said the executive faculty gave the admissions committee discretion in flexible criteria for admission for those with disadvantaged educational background. Roy Vagelos of Biochemistry was a key player on the Executive Faculty along with John Herweg, who headed the admissions committee starting in the early 1960s. Guze recalled that the first African American medical student (1953?) had difficulty and the second had no difficulty, but the executive faculty wanted more African Americans admitted and numbers did not start to go up significantly until about 1968. This was due to the hiring of Bob Lee, Dean of Minority Affairs, whose sole responsibility at first was minority students.

Guze discusses the parallel but related desegregation of the St. Louis City Hospital and health care systems. He notes that the segregated city healthcare system included two large general hospitals, Homer G. Phillips (St. Louis City Hospital no. 2) built in 1937 on the north side for African-Americans and older St. Louis City Hospital (no. 1 or Max Starkloff) for whites on the south side. He said there was one psychiatric unit at the Malcolm Bliss Center for whites and a separate psychiatric unit for blacks run by black psychiatrists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. And he recalled that there was a long-standing formal teaching arrangement with 'Max Starkloff or St. Louis City Hospital no. 1 in several services on the south side including psychiatry, medicine, surgery, infectious disease unit, laboratory and isolation unit. But he noted the teaching arrangement with Homer G. Phillips Hospital was less complete and depended on personal relationships in each Service. For example the teaching arrangement with the Surgery Service at Homer G. Phillips was more complete because of the efforts of Robert Elman of the Surgery Department at Washington University School of Medicine to have regular teaching rounds at Homer G. Phillips. Guze notes that desegregation of both facilities led the city to evaluate whether the city needed two large general hospital complexes. A group of black physicians approached Guze in the 1970s about an affiliation, but Guze insisted on conditions that Homer G. Phillips was not prepared to meet then including the right to appoint medical staff.

Guze, Samuel B.

Frank O. Richards Papers

  • FC103
  • Collection
  • 1937-2003

The Frank O. Richards papers contains statistical and narrative pertaining primarily to Homer G. Phillips Hospital, the St. Louis municipal hospital founded and operated for African Americans in 1937, but also to two other institutions, City Hospital No. 2 and the Peoples’ Hospital, that treated black patients during decades of official racial segregation. Included are files on William H. Sinkler, medical director of Phillips Hospital from 1941 until 1960. The files in Box 1 in particular document the writing of his chapter, “The St. Louis Story,” in A Century of Black Surgeons. Box 2 contains later additions, notably an undergraduate thesis by Dean Lee Kolnick (2003) on Homer G. Phillips Hospital.

Richards, Frank O.

Frank O. Richards Photographs

  • VC243
  • Collection
  • 1919-1987

This collection consists of 63 Photographs, negatives and slides. The collection sonsists primarily of images of physicians, staff and structures of the Homer G. Phillips Hospital. The images were compiled by Frank O. Richards, M.D. as illustrations for his chapter "St. Louis Story - Homer G. Phillips Hospital," in: A Century of Black Surgeons: The U.S.A. Experience, ed. by Claude H. Organ and Margaret Kosiba (1987).

Richards, Frank O.

Park J. White Papers

  • FC027
  • Collection
  • 1913-1979

The Park J. White Papers contain correspondence and publications relating to his career in the Department of Pediatrics and his appointments at St. Louis Children's Hospital and Homer G. Phillips Hospital. Also included are his publications on politics, race relations, religion, and health; other scientific manuscripts and literary manuscripts, including works of poetry; and speeches and lecture material related to the course in medical ethics which he taught at the Washington University School of Medicine.

White, Park J.

Richard W. Hudgens Oral History

  • OH049
  • Collection
  • 4/28/1981

Hudgens relates some of his experiences as a student at WUSM in the 1950s and some of his influential professors, such as Edward Dempsey, Carl Moore, George Saslow, and Sam Guze. Hudgens also discusses the development of his interest in psychiatry, his medical residencies in Virginia and North Carolina, his experiences as a staff psychiatrist at the U.S. Air Force Hospital at Lackland AFB in Texas, and his experiences on the faculty and in the administration of the Washington University School of Medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 28, 1981. OH049. Approximate Length 59 minutes.

Hudgens, Richard W.

Helen E. Nash Oral History

  • OH073
  • Collection
  • 4/20/1999

Nash discusses growing up in Atlanta as the child of a successful African-American physician father and music teacher mother. She relates some of her experiences attending Meharry Medical College in the early 1940s and coming to St. Louis for her internship and residency at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. Nash discusses establishing and running a successful solo pediatric practice and the racism and sexism she faced during her professional career. She also discusses her mentor, Park J. White, and some of their experiences fighting segregation in medical care in St. Louis. Interviewed by Marion Hunt on April 20, 1999. OH073. Approximate Length 71 minutes.

Nash, Helen E.