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Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH065)

  • OH065
  • Collection
  • October 11, 1989

Interviewed by Richard W. Hudgens in 1989.

This is a five part interview on the history of the Neuropsychiatry department and the psychiatry department of Washington University School of Medicine. Part 1 begins with questions on the neuropsychiatry department in World War II beginning with Edward Gildea. He was a proponent of biological psychiatry, but was tolerant of the psychoanalysts on staff like his wife Margaret Gildea. Guze discusses the dynamic between the biologically oriented faculty Gildea appointed such as George Saslow, Eli Robins and George Winokur and himself. He also mentions George Ulett and David Graham. Guze explains how he got into psychiatry, when his initial goal was to be an internist. He also describes in the end of part 1 and beginning of part 2 how in 1955, Guze, Robins and Winokur, the three assistant professor in Psychiatry in 1955 went to Gildea with their plan for a biologically oriented psychiatry department. Gildea was supportive and they divided up duties. In the training of students, biological psychiatry emphasizes diagnosis and research, clinical studies of etiology including neuropathology, pharmacology, and neurochemistry. Eli Robins was the prime mover in the movement on regularizing diagnostic criteria. At the end of part 2, Guze discusses Gildeas strengths and weaknesses and is asked about Gildea's conflict with James O'Leary. Guze is asked how Eli Robins became head of the new Psychiatry Department. Dr. Ulett was also a contender for department chair. in part 3, Guze discusses Robins era and the effect of Eli's multiple sclerosis on his own research and the psychiatry department. In part 5, Guze discusses how he met Joy Guze, his wife and his childhood especially parents and grandparents and schooling. Antisemitic quotas affected admission to medical schools particularly before World War II.

Guze, Samuel B.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH066)

  • OH066
  • Collection
  • 1994

Guze discusses his experience as a student of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of faculty members such as Carl and Gerty Cori, Mildred Trotter, Ethel Ronzoni Bishop, Joseph Erlanger, Barry Wood, Evarts A. Graham, Helen Tredway Graham, Sarah Luse, and Carl Moore. Guze explains how his interest in the field of psychiatry developed and the influence of George Saslow on his career. He also discusses building the psychiatry program at Washington University with his colleagues Eli Robins and George Winokur, his work on the genetics of psychiatric disorders, and the interest and development of child psychiatry as a discipline within the medical school. Colleagues such as M. Kenton King. Virginia Weldon, Paula J. Clayton, Lee Robins, and James Anthony are discussed. This oral history consists of a series of seven interviews conducted in 1994. The interviews were transcribed and edited by the interviewer, Marion Hunt, in 1994. The transcription was corrected and annotated by the interviewee in 1995. Interviewed by Marion Hunt in 1994. OH066. Approximate Length 49 leaves.

Guze, Samuel B.