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A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • OH026
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1976

The three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 24, 1976. OH026. Approximate Length 87 minutes.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

Hallowell Davis Oral History

  • OH027
  • Collection
  • 4/6/1977

These interviews begin with Davis’s studies at Harvard and his post-graduate study in England. Davis discusses his research on the electrophysiology of the auditory system and electrical activity of the brain and his defense work during World War II studying human tolerance to loud sounds. Davis describes the establishment of a research department at the Central Institute for the Deaf and work on hearing tests and speech audiometry, including the development of the first American standards for audiometers. Davis describes then-current methods in electro-physiology to measure peripheral hearing of young children by detecting electrical responses in the brain. The interview ends with a brief discussion of the problems related to world overpopulation, pollution, and international relations.

The transcript presents an edited version of the sound recording. The interview begins with a biographical sketch of Hallowell Davis, and ends with a revised biographical sketch. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on April 6, 1977 and April 28, 1977. OH027. Approximate Length 2 hours, 45 minutes.

Davis, Hallowell, 1896-1992

Percy J. Carroll Oral History

  • OH028
  • Collection
  • 2/23/1981

Carroll recounts his service in the Army Medical Corps from 1916 to 1946: service in France during World War I; postings to the Philippines, China, Jefferson Barracks; medical service with the Civilian Conservation Corps during the early years of the Depression; medical service in the South Pacific during World War II; contacts with Douglas McArthur. Also covered are Carroll’s post-war experiences as dean of the Creighton University School of Medicine.

Audio quality is very poor in parts of the first 90 minutes of the interview. Carroll’s wife Helen occasionally speaks during the interview. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on February 23, 1981 and March 4, 1981. OH028. Approximate Length 3 hours.

Carroll, Percy J.

Virginia Minnich Oral History

  • OH029
  • Collection
  • 3/25/1981

Minnich discusses her undergraduate studies at Ohio State University and her graduate studies at Iowa State College. She describes research work in college on serum iron metabolism, done with Carl V. Moore, and his later offer of employment as a researcher at the Washington University School of Medicine in 1938. Minnich details some of her research on iron metabolism, anemias and purpura, as well as her work setting up laboratories in Thailand and Turkey. She also discusses her work creating audio-visual teaching aids, teaching evening classes, and changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over her 40-plus year career. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on March 25, 1981. OH029. Approximate Length 77 minutes.

Minnich, Virginia

H. Rommel Hildreth Oral History

  • OH030
  • Collection
  • 4/8/1981

Hildreth discusses the dispute between the Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital in the early 1960s, and the roles of Edgar M. Queeny (chairman of the Trustees of Barnes Hospital), Edward W. Dempsey (dean of the medical school), consultants Joseph Hinsey and John H. Knowles, and Washington University chancellor George Pake. Hildreth also talks about some of the faculty of the medical school while he was a student in the mid-1920s, such as Evarts A. Graham and Joseph Erlanger.  Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on April 8, 1981. OH030. Approximate Length 53 minutes.

Hildreth, H. Rommel

Brent M. Parker Oral History

  • OH031
  • Collection
  • 5/12/1977

Parker relates some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine, and some of the memorable faculty members, such as W. Barry Wood. Parker also discusses changes in medical school education over the years, medical malpractice insurance, Medicare, and euthanasia. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 12, 1977. OH031. Approximate Length 40 minutes.

Parker, Brent M.

John D. Davidson Oral History

  • OH032
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1977

Davidson discusses his experiences as a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine, his internship at St. Louis City Hospital, and his fellowship in Cardiology at the National Heart Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, which involved the study of hypertension. Davidson discusses research at St. Luke’s Hospital on treatments to decrease the amount of heart damage after a heart attack. Davidson also discusses changes in medical education from the late 1940s/early 1950s to the mid-1970s, and medical malpractice insurance and Medicaid problems facing physicians in the 1970s. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 13, 1977. OH032. Approximate Length 62 minutes.

Davidson, John D.

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • OH033
  • Collection
  • 5/17/1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care. Audio quality of interview is poor. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 17, 1977. OH033. Approximate Length 32 minutes.

Stewart, Frances H.

Jessie L. Ternberg Oral History

  • OH034
  • Collection
  • May 8, 1978

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1978. Approximate Length: 2 hours and 40 minutes.

Ternberg, Jessie L.

Mabel L. Purkerson Oral History

  • OH035
  • Collection
  • September 25, 1978

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1978. Approximate Length: 72 minutes.

Purkerson, Mabel L.

Park J. White Oral History

  • OH036
  • Collection
  • 1/29/1979

White discusses his decision to come to St. Louis Children’s Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine in 1920, and his interaction with Williams McKim Marriott. He describes the medical ethics course he taught for over twenty years. White shares his views on fee-splitting, abortion and birth control, euthanasia, women in medicine, malpractice insurance, and answers a question about his involvement in the integration of the Academy of Pediatrics in the 1940’s. The discussion covers White’s medical practice and treatment of disadvantaged children and the prevalence of lead-poisoning in that population. The interview concludes with White reciting one of his poems. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on January 29, 1979. OH036. Approximate Length 60 minutes.

White, Park J.

Crawford F. Sams Oral History

  • OH037
  • Collection
  • 5/3/1979

Sams discusses his decision to pursue a medical degree at the Washington University School of Medicine, his interest in neurosurgery, and the influence of faculty member Ernest Sachs. He describes his research on heat syndrome while assigned to the Panama Canal Department and talks extensively about his work during the Second World War in the Middle East, Europe, and the Far East in preparing medical services for casualties. At the end of the Second World War Sams was made Chief of the Public Health and Welfare Section of the General Headquarters, Supreme Command Allied Powers and was responsible for the establishment of all activities pertaining to the health and welfare of the Japanese. Sams relates his contributions in the rebuilding Japan, including studying the effects of radiation after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, establishing mass immunization programs, improving medical care and education, and nutrition initiatives during this period. He also describes similar work he performed in Korea before, during and after the Korean War. Sams then discusses his research on low-level radiation at the Operations Research Center at the University of California-Berkeley, as well as the early efforts in the application of computer systems to biological research. The audio quality of the interview is inconsistent and at times very poor. There are several instances of unintelligible words or sentences. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 3, 1979. OH037. Approximate Length 112 minutes.

Sams, Crawford F.

Daniel Nathans Oral History (OH038)

  • OH038
  • Collection
  • 5/4/1979

Nathans participated in two oral histories. In the first interview, Nathans discusses his childhood in Wilmington, Delaware, his undergraduate education at the University of Delaware, and his experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine. Nathans recalls some of men who influenced his career, including Barry Wood, Carl Cori, Oliver Lowry, Robert Loeb, Fritz Lipmann, and colleagues such as Hamilton O. Smith and Norton Zinder. He recalls his internship and residency at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York, and his experiences as a researcher at the National Institutes of Health, Rockefeller University and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel.

In the first interview, Nathans describes some of his research in microbiology, the biosynthesis of proteins, restriction enzymes, RNA phages, and molecular genetics. In the second interview, Nathans discusses the potential significance of his research on recombinant DNA and the effect of winning the Nobel Prize on his personal life and career.

The audio quality of the interviews is inconsistent. Some portions are inaudible. The first interview lasts approximately 56 minutes; the second interview follows immediately and lasts approximately 48 minutes. There is background noise during the second interview. Interviewed by Dr. Sondra Schlesinger (first interview) and Dorothy A. Brockoff (second interview); introduction by Darryl Podoll on May 4, 1979. The oral history number is OH038. Approximate Length is 104 minutes.

Nathans, Daniel

Estelle Brodman Oral History (OH039)

  • OH039
  • Collection
  • November 22, 1978

Dr. Brodman explains her pursuit of a degree in Library Science, her two years at Columbia University, and her early career in the Medical Library Association. Dr. Brodman then discusses her career at the National Library of Medicine and the differences between the Army Medical Library of the 1940s and the National Library of Medicine of the 1970s. She mentions the development of MEDLARS and GRACE and the demise of the Index Catalog. Dr. Brodman tells of coming to Washington University School of Medicine Library and changes in libraries over the decades. The several interviewers next respond to Dr. Brodman’s questions about the changes in the Washington University School of Medicine Library. The interview ends with Estelle Brodman’s statement on how fulfilling and exciting medical librarianship has been for her.

Interviewed by Audrey K. Berteau, Loretta Stucki , Barbara Halbrook, Mrs. Betty Kulifay, and Millard Johnson

Brodman, Estelle

Charles W. McLaughlin, Jr. Oral History

  • OH040
  • Collection
  • 5/4/1979

McLaughlin discusses completing his medical degree at Washington University School of Medicine and his internship and residency experiences. McLaughlin recounts his service as a surgeon during the Second World War in the U.S. Naval Reserves. He also discusses the role of the American College of Surgeons, his many medical publications on breast and other cancers, and trends in medicine. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 4, 1979. OH040. Approximate Length 61 minutes.

McLaughlin, Charles W., Jr.

Paul E. Lacy Oral History

  • OH041
  • Collection
  • December 17, 1979

Interviewed by Richard E. Lynch in 1979. Approximate Length: 87 minutes.
Lacy discusses his early research while in medical school and during post-doctoral training at the Mayo Clinic, which led to his interest in studying the islets of Langerhans and in the transplantation of islets as a cure for diabetes. Lacy also discusses his responsibilities as chairman of the WUSM Department of Pathology and the conflict between Barnes Hospital and WUSM in the early 1960s. Colleagues, such as Edward Dempsey and Stanley Hartroft, are discussed, as well as many other scientists whose research influenced Lacy's work.

Lacy, Paul E.

Israel D. Newmark and Stanley L. Harrison Oral History

  • OH042
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Israel Newmark and Stanley Harrison discuss some of their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine and graduating at the beginning of the Depression. Both discuss aspects of their internships and residencies, including the low pay that they received. Changes in medical training, continuing medical education, pediatrics and the treatment of children, and homeopathic practitioners are discussed. Newmark and Harrison also recall some of their memorable professors, such as W. McKim Marriott. Interviewed by Paul Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH042. Approximate Length 65 minutes.

Newmark, Israel D.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • OH043
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH043. Approximate length 63 minutes.

Drews, Robert C.

Robert E. Shank Oral History

  • OH044
  • Collection
  • 6/27/1980

Shank discusses his student years at the Washington University School of Medicine and his research with Dr. David Barr; his research at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research during World War II; and his postwar research at the Public Health Research Institute for the City of New York. The conversation then focuses on the major research focus of Shank’s career – nutritional studies. Shank relates his experiences conducting nutritional study research in Newfoundland; the study of nutrition during war and the necessity of providing proper nutrition to troops; public health surveys conducted overseas under the auspices of the Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense (ICNND); and his experiences as participant and consultant to the Public Health Service and the Indian Health Service. Shank comments on the challenge of improving nutrition standards in developing countries with steadily increasing populations and the role of the National Research Council and the Food Nutrition Board in the development of standards of recommended dietary allowances of nutrients. He also discusses the growth of the vitamin industry, nutrition in prepared and baby foods, and obesity. The discussion then covers the development of the WUSM Department of Preventive Medicine while Shank was its head – the Irene Walter Johnson Institute of Rehabilitation, the Medical Care Group under its initial director Gerald Perkoff, the division of biostatistics, Health Care Research, applied physiology, epidemiology, and lipid research. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on June 27, 1980. OH044. Approximate Length 130 minutes.

Shank, Robert E.

Joseph Erlanger Oral History

  • OH045
  • Collection
  • January 1964

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman and  Margaret Erlanger in 1964. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Erlanger, Joseph

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