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Oral History
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Paul E. Lacy Oral History

  • OH041
  • Collection
  • December 17, 1979

Interviewed by Richard E. Lynch in 1979. Approximate Length: 87 minutes.
Lacy discusses his early research while in medical school and during post-doctoral training at the Mayo Clinic, which led to his interest in studying the islets of Langerhans and in the transplantation of islets as a cure for diabetes. Lacy also discusses his responsibilities as chairman of the WUSM Department of Pathology and the conflict between Barnes Hospital and WUSM in the early 1960s. Colleagues, such as Edward Dempsey and Stanley Hartroft, are discussed, as well as many other scientists whose research influenced Lacy's work.

Lacy, Paul E.

Israel D. Newmark and Stanley L. Harrison Oral History

  • OH042
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Israel Newmark and Stanley Harrison discuss some of their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine and graduating at the beginning of the Depression. Both discuss aspects of their internships and residencies, including the low pay that they received. Changes in medical training, continuing medical education, pediatrics and the treatment of children, and homeopathic practitioners are discussed. Newmark and Harrison also recall some of their memorable professors, such as W. McKim Marriott. Interviewed by Paul Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH042. Approximate Length 65 minutes.

Newmark, Israel D.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • OH043
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH043. Approximate length 63 minutes.

Drews, Robert C.

Robert E. Shank Oral History

  • OH044
  • Collection
  • 6/27/1980

Shank discusses his student years at the Washington University School of Medicine and his research with Dr. David Barr; his research at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research during World War II; and his postwar research at the Public Health Research Institute for the City of New York. The conversation then focuses on the major research focus of Shank’s career – nutritional studies. Shank relates his experiences conducting nutritional study research in Newfoundland; the study of nutrition during war and the necessity of providing proper nutrition to troops; public health surveys conducted overseas under the auspices of the Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense (ICNND); and his experiences as participant and consultant to the Public Health Service and the Indian Health Service. Shank comments on the challenge of improving nutrition standards in developing countries with steadily increasing populations and the role of the National Research Council and the Food Nutrition Board in the development of standards of recommended dietary allowances of nutrients. He also discusses the growth of the vitamin industry, nutrition in prepared and baby foods, and obesity. The discussion then covers the development of the WUSM Department of Preventive Medicine while Shank was its head – the Irene Walter Johnson Institute of Rehabilitation, the Medical Care Group under its initial director Gerald Perkoff, the division of biostatistics, Health Care Research, applied physiology, epidemiology, and lipid research. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on June 27, 1980. OH044. Approximate Length 130 minutes.

Shank, Robert E.

Joseph Erlanger Oral History

  • OH045
  • Collection
  • January 1964

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman and  Margaret Erlanger in 1964. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Erlanger, Joseph

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes.

Jones, Andrew B.

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • OH047
  • Collection
  • 10/17/1980

Arthur Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on October 17, 1980. OH047. Approximate Length 39 minutes.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Arnold E. Schaefer Oral History

  • OH048
  • Collection
  • 11/7/1980

Schaefer discusses his work with the Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense (ICNND) in the 1950s and 1960s, and the organization’s work in coordinating projects and studies in nutrition and assisting developing countries to address nutrition problems of both civilian populations and military personnel. He talks about his service as a nutrition officer during World War II, the beginnings of United States government interest in the nutrition of foreign nations, the nutrition office in the U.S. Army Office of the Surgeon General, and the formation of the ICNND following the Korean War. Several of Schaefer’s colleagues are discussed, including Frank B. Berry, Harold R. Sandstead, and John B. Youmans. Schaefer describes the cooperation between the ICNND and the U.S. Navy medical research units, how ICNND surveys yielded valuable clinical research data, and how the ICNND projects established laboratories and trained personnel in developing countries. Schaefer also discusses other international projects on nutrition, the Food for Peace (PL-480) program, domestic U.S. nutrition surveys, and rivalries between various U.S. government agencies (such as the United States Agency for International Development – USAID) concerned with nutrition. This oral history contains language (including obscenities) that could be interpreted as offensive to some users. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on November 7, 1980. OH048. Approximate Length 170 minutes.

Schaefer, Arnold E.

Richard W. Hudgens Oral History

  • OH049
  • Collection
  • 4/28/1981

Hudgens relates some of his experiences as a student at WUSM in the 1950s and some of his influential professors, such as Edward Dempsey, Carl Moore, George Saslow, and Sam Guze. Hudgens also discusses the development of his interest in psychiatry, his medical residencies in Virginia and North Carolina, his experiences as a staff psychiatrist at the U.S. Air Force Hospital at Lackland AFB in Texas, and his experiences on the faculty and in the administration of the Washington University School of Medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 28, 1981. OH049. Approximate Length 59 minutes.

Hudgens, Richard W.

Harriet Smith Kaplan Oral History

  • OH050
  • Collection
  • 5/6/1981

Kaplan discusses her experiences as a female medical student at Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s, her internship at San Francisco General Hospital, her work in nuclear medicine and psychiatry, and colleagues and teachers such as Arthur Kornberg. She also compares medical students of the 1950s to those of the 1970s and 1980s. Interviewed by Paul Anderson on May 6, 1981. OH050. Approximate Length 77 minutes.

Kaplan, Harriet Smith

Tom F. Whayne Oral History

  • OH051
  • Collection
  • 5/7/1981

Whayne shares memories of his experiences at Washington University School of Medicine and teachers such as David P. Barr and Evarts A. Graham. He discusses his impressions as an intern at Missouri Baptist Hospital and as a resident at Missouri Pacific Hospital and his experiences in the Reserve Officers Corps at a Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Missouri. Whayne relates how he joined the Army Medical Corps during the Depression, and his assignments during the 1930s at Fitzsimmons General Hospital, Carlisle Barracks, and in Panama. The development of Whayne’s interest in tropical medicine, preventive medicine, and nutrition during the Second World War is covered. Whayne discusses colleagues such as Crawford Sams, Stanhope Bayne-Jones, and James Stevens Simmons. He also talks of his contribution to the U.S. Army Medical Department’s clinical series, Preventive Medicine in World War II. The interview concludes with a discussion about the meaning of the terms preventive medicine, public health, community medicine and family medicine, and Whayne’s experiences in academic medicine after his retirement from the military. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 7, 1981. OH051. Approximate Length 137 minutes.

Whayne, Tom F. (Tom French)

Estelle Brodman Oral History (OH052)

  • OH052
  • Collection
  • 11/22/1978

Dr. Brodman explains her pursuit of a degree in Library Science, her two years at Columbia University, and her early career in the Medical Library Association. Dr. Brodman then discusses her career at the National Library of Medicine and the differences between the Army Medical Library of the 1940s and the National Library of Medicine of the 1970s. She mentions the development of MEDLARS and GRACE and the demise of the Index Catalog. Dr. Brodman tells of coming to Washington University School of Medicine Library and changes in libraries over the decades. The several interviewers next respond to Dr. Brodman’s questions about the changes in the Washington University School of Medicine Library. The interview ends with Estelle Brodman’s statement on how fulfilling and exciting medical librarianship has been for her.

Dr. Brodman was interviewed in 1978 by several library staff members. The original transcript identifies the interviewers as “Mrs. Bertell and Others.” The identification of Mrs. Bertell was probably a transcription error as there is no record of a “Mrs. Bertell” on the Medical Library staff at that time. However, rosters of the staff suggest that “Mrs. Bertell” was actually Audrey K. Berteau, who served as head of public services from 1977-1979. Mrs. Berteau was the first interviewer. Where the interviewer is unknown, "INT" has been used. Interviewerd by:Audrey K. Berteau, Loretta Stucki, Barbara Halbrook, Betty Kulifay, Millard Johnson on November 22, 1978. OH052. Approximate Length: 17 leaves.

Brodman, Estelle

William S. Dock Oral History

  • OH053
  • Collection
  • 10/5/1981

Dock discusses his preclinical education in medical school in the late 1910s at Washington University School of Medicine and early research with cathode ray oscilloscopes. He talks about his father, George Dock, who was professor of medicine (1910-1922) and dean (1910-1912) of the WUSM, and the differences in medical education in his father’s and his generations. Dock discusses his impressions of members of the WUSM faculty, including Joseph Erlanger, Robert J. Terry, and Eugene Opie. He also relates some of his experiences as a pathology professor at several medical schools. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on October 5, 1981. OH053. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Dock, William S.

Harry Agress Oral History

  • OH054
  • Collection
  • 4/22/1982

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 22, 1982. OH054. Approximate Length: 93 minutes.

Agress, Harry

Francis O. Schmitt Oral History

  • OH055
  • Collection
  • 6/7/1982

Schmitt discusses his early interest in science and his decision to study physiology with Joseph Erlanger. He talks of his teachers and colleagues at Washington University, including Evarts A. Graham, Helen Tredway Graham, Herbert Gasser, George Bishop, Philip A. Shaffer, Carl Cori, and Viktor Hamburger. Schmitt describes Erlanger and Gasser’s research on action potentials that led to their receiving the Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology. There is also discussion of some of Schmitt’s research on kidney function with Harvey Lester White, his research on the excitability of heart muscle, and polarization optics. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on June 7, 1982. OH055. Approximate Length 93 minutes.

Schmitt, Francis Otto

Carl F. Cori Oral History

  • OH056
  • Collection
  • 10/18/1982

Cori recounts his education in Trieste and Prague and his service as a medic in World War I. He describes his early research in pharmacology in Europe and then his and his wife’s emigration to the U.S. when Cori accepted a position as chief biochemist at the State Institute for the Study of Malignant Disease in Buffalo, New York in 1922. The interview covers Cori’s acceptance of the position of head of the Department of Pharmacology at the Washington University School of Medicine in 1931, his gradual shift to the Department of Biochemistry and winning the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine with his wife and Bernardo Houssay in 1947. Cori discusses several of his colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine, including Leo Loeb, Joseph Erlanger, Evarts A. Graham, Robert J. Terry, Oliver Lowry, and W. McKim Marriott.

The audio quality of the interview is inconsistent. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on October 18, 1982. OH056. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Cori, Carl F.

Robert C. Kolodny Oral History

  • OH057
  • Collection
  • November 21, 2013

The interview concerns Kolodny's experiences as a medical student at the Washington University School of Medicine from 1965 until his graduation in 1969. He speaks of the realities of diversity and integration at the medical school at that time. He also talks about his experience with fellow students in creating a course on medical ethics. Faculty members specifically mentioned include Virginia Minnich and Sarah Luse. The interview was recorded on November 21, 2013. Approximate length is 58 minutes. OH057

Kolodny, Robert C.

Thomas A. Woolsey Oral History

  • OH058
  • Collection
  • February 8, 2016

This interview, recorded over two days, covers Woolsey's time as a medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine from 1965 to 1969 and as a faculty member of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1971 to 2016. OH058

Woolsey, Thomas A.

Nathan Shock Oral History

  • OH059
  • Collection

Interviewed by Margaret Cowdry Hahn in 1984. Both recording and transcript are missing.

Clark Tibbits Oral History

  • OH060
  • Collection

Interviewed by Margaret Cowdry Hahn in 1984. Both recording and transcript are missing.

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