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Saint Louis (Mo.)
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Evarts A. Graham Papers

  • FC003
  • Collection
  • 1904-1957

The original inventory of the Graham Papers was compiled before the collection was donated to the Washington University School of Medicine Library.  Unfortunately, some items were removed from Dr. Graham’s files before the collection was donated.  Therefore, the inventory that was provided along with the collection included citations to many items, particularly scientific reprints, which had in fact been removed from the files before the collection was donated to the Archives.

The decision was made by the library staff to continue using the original inventory in order to show the collection in its entirety.  The inventory has been revised to include the following changes: (1) empty folders are marked as such by brackets or by an asterisk (*) to indicate items removed; (2) the collection has been microfilmed, and notations concerning the reels may be found within the inventory; (3) the collection has been placed in document boxes and notations concerning the boxes have been added to the inventory.

The files are divided into sixteen series, which are listed below. The series designations together with the folder titles provide basic descriptions of the contents.  Particular note, however, should be made of series 11, which contains correspondence files of Dr. Fred Murphy, Graham’s predecessor as Chairman of the Department of Surgery.

Graham, Evarts A. (Evarts Ambrose), 1883-1957

Joseph H. Ogura Papers

  • FC042
  • Collection
  • 1935-1983

The Ogura papers include five document series including general correspondence, research manuscripts, appointment calendars, medical school notes, and reprints. In terms of subjects, the general correspondence includes Ogura’s editorial work for The Laryngoscope and peer reviews for other journals, as well as professional associations to which Ogura gave much time. Of local interest is material on Barnes Hospital, Jewish Hospital, but mostly on the administration of the department of Otolaryngology in the Washington University School of Medicine.

The research manuscripts and reprints cover his clinical research interests in head and neck surgery, laryngeal physiology and transplantation, and nasopulmonary mechanics. Formats of the paper documents include correspondence, department records, notebooks, manuscripts, and reprints. The reprints are a sampling of his 300 published articles.

Ogura, Joseph H.

Andrew B. Barbee Papers

  • FC048
  • Collection
  • 1843-1879

Photocopies of memoir and letters of Barbee dating from the mid-1800s. Memoir includes descriptions of the cholera epidemics of 1849 and 1866.

Barbee, Andrew B.

Kenneth M. Ludmerer Papers

  • FC066
  • Collection
  • 1978-1998

Prospectus and manuscripts for "Time to Heal" and three notebooks compiled by Ludmerer as house officer at Barnes Hospital, June 23 to December 28, 1978 concerning patients in his care (Confidential materials: name of patients may not be duplicated or divulged by users of collection).

Ludmerer, Kenneth M.

Adele B. Croninger Papers

  • FC069
  • Collection
  • 1938-1959

Reprint collection of scientific publications. Most are related to smoking in relation to lung cancer, carcinoma. Most reprints are in English. Also one folder of laboratory notes on tar and radiation experiments.

Croninger, Adele B.

M. Kenton King Papers

  • FC090
  • Collection
  • 1965-1992

This small collection includes a draft and final copy of King's The Executive Faculty: An Administrative Tradition at the School of Medicine of Washington University, 1992.

King, M. Kenton (Morris Kenton)

Charles O. Curtman Papers

  • FC093
  • Collection
  • 1865-1897

Collection includes Curtman’s valedictory address to the 1869 class of the Missouri Medical College, a scrapbook of obituaries and biographical articles about Curtman, and an 1865 United States internal revenue license issued to Curtman to practice as a physician in Memphis.

Curtman, Charles O.

Herbert A. Anderson Oral History

  • OH022
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Anderson discusses his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and some of his instructors, including Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs. Anderson also details his experiences as senior medical officer on a hospital transport ship during World War II and his continuing study of abdominal surgery at the Allgemeine Krankenhaus at the University of Vienna. Interviewed by Darryl B. Podoll on May 13 , 1976. OH022. Approximate Length 41 minutes.

Anderson, Herbert A., Jr.

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • OH033
  • Collection
  • 5/17/1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care. Audio quality of interview is poor. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 17, 1977. OH033. Approximate Length 32 minutes.

Stewart, Frances H.

Joseph Erlanger Oral History

  • OH045
  • Collection
  • January 1964

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman and  Margaret Erlanger in 1964. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Erlanger, Joseph

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH065)

  • OH065
  • Collection
  • October 11, 1989

Interviewed by Richard W. Hudgens in 1989.

This is a five part interview on the history of the Neuropsychiatry department and the psychiatry department of Washington University School of Medicine. Part 1 begins with questions on the neuropsychiatry department in World War II beginning with Edward Gildea. He was a proponent of biological psychiatry, but was tolerant of the psychoanalysts on staff like his wife Margaret Gildea. Guze discusses the dynamic between the biologically oriented faculty Gildea appointed such as George Saslow, Eli Robins and George Winokur and himself. He also mentions George Ulett and David Graham. Guze explains how he got into psychiatry, when his initial goal was to be an internist. He also describes in the end of part 1 and beginning of part 2 how in 1955, Guze, Robins and Winokur, the three assistant professor in Psychiatry in 1955 went to Gildea with their plan for a biologically oriented psychiatry department. Gildea was supportive and they divided up duties. In the training of students, biological psychiatry emphasizes diagnosis and research, clinical studies of etiology including neuropathology, pharmacology, and neurochemistry. Eli Robins was the prime mover in the movement on regularizing diagnostic criteria. At the end of part 2, Guze discusses Gildeas strengths and weaknesses and is asked about Gildea's conflict with James O'Leary. Guze is asked how Eli Robins became head of the new Psychiatry Department. Dr. Ulett was also a contender for department chair. in part 3, Guze discusses Robins era and the effect of Eli's multiple sclerosis on his own research and the psychiatry department. In part 5, Guze discusses how he met Joy Guze, his wife and his childhood especially parents and grandparents and schooling. Antisemitic quotas affected admission to medical schools particularly before World War II.

Guze, Samuel B.

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH079)

  • OH079
  • Collection
  • March 2005

Candace O'Connor conducted the interview with John Herweg as part of her research in the history of the St. Louis Children’s Hospital for the hospital’s 125th anniversary publication. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 53 minutes.

O'Connor asked John Herweg to discuss his experiences at St. Louis Children's Hospital during the Alexis Hartmann era, 1936-early 1960s. As a medical student at Washington University in 1942-1945. he found the milieu at Children's Hospital was exciting, almost magical, because the medical and nursing staff were early adopters of each new antibiotic. Diagnosis was key in cures of children with meningitis and mastoiditis, who could be cured if caught in time. The pediatrician in-chief Alexis Hartmann Sr. and Jean Valjean cook provided guidance to the medical students in their sophomore, junior and senior years to save children’s lives.

Herwig reviews his experience as a student, intern, and resident of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of thrilling teachers such as Hartmann Sr. and Zebatine Hybias???? [Zentay?}. They knew medicine not only the laboratory aspects but clinical aspects. Hartmann brought patients and their mothers to the amphitheatre as well as the clinic where students saw clinical practice demonstrated. Herwig also rubbed shoulders with outstanding people who were research scientists besides the five research scientists, who were or were about to be Nobel Laureates including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, and Dr. Hershey in Bacterioiogy.

Hartmann insisted that Herweg stay for his internship and residency. Herwig was one of the bright medical students that Hartman recruited into pediatrics and nutured along. He helped them rise.

He mentions his first wife, Janet Scovill, who had finished her pediatric residency at Children’s (Which Children’s ) before him. [She died in 1958.} He also speaks of his present wife Dottie Glahn, who was head nurse of the infant ward at St. Louis Children’s Hospital from 1947-1959.
The interviewer asked him his recollections of tMrs. Langenberg, Gracie Jones and other women on women on the Board of Children’s hospital. He also briefly discussed interactions with Estelle Claiborne, the hospital administrator.

He recalls that World War II’s major effect on St. Louis Children’s Hospital was reduction of the number of house officers. The residents who were in charge of the hospital during the nighttime hours were consequently overworked.
The budget was very stringent at the end of the war. For example there were 2 glass syringes and they had to be autoclaved before use and they were in constant use. The staff cooled Patients were co by blowing a fan over a 50 pound cake of ice to make up for a lack of air conditioning.

Concerning the Butler Ward, the segregated was for African-Americans, he admits the house officers might have integrated Children's Hospital earlier. He thought integration came about when Dave Golden called up Hartmann later in the 1940s and said he wanted to put an African patient on a ward by treatment needed rather than in the Butler ward. Hartmann agreed and Herwig thought that was the beginning of integration of St. Louis Chidlren's Hospital.

As to whether Hermann was prejudiced, Herweg didn't think so. He said he had good relations with Helen and Homer Nash and later Alison Nash, Homer's daughter, at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. But he notes that Hartman wasn't an activist like Park White. He then recalls his impressions of Park White who he also admired.

Herweg, John C.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH102)

  • OH102
  • Collection

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 49 minutes. Interviewers, Bill Geideman and James Carter.

Guze discusses his experience with segregation and desegregation of Barnes Hospital, Renard Hospital, its psychiatric service and unit. He guessed the psychiatric service desegregated the Barnes Hospital psychiatric unit in October 1953.

He and the interviewers had a clearer timeline for desegregation of admission of medical students to the Washington University School of Medicine. He said the executive faculty gave the admissions committee discretion in flexible criteria for admission for those with disadvantaged educational background. Roy Vagelos of Biochemistry was a key player on the Executive Faculty along with John Herweg, who headed the admissions committee starting in the early 1960s. Guze recalled that the first African American medical student (1953?) had difficulty and the second had no difficulty, but the executive faculty wanted more African Americans admitted and numbers did not start to go up significantly until about 1968. This was due to the hiring of Bob Lee, Dean of Minority Affairs, whose sole responsibility at first was minority students.

Guze discusses the parallel but related desegregation of the St. Louis City Hospital and health care systems. He notes that the segregated city healthcare system included two large general hospitals, Homer G. Phillips (St. Louis City Hospital no. 2) built in 1937 on the north side for African-Americans and older St. Louis City Hospital (no. 1 or Max Starkloff) for whites on the south side. He said there was one psychiatric unit at the Malcolm Bliss Center for whites and a separate psychiatric unit for blacks run by black psychiatrists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. And he recalled that there was a long-standing formal teaching arrangement with 'Max Starkloff or St. Louis City Hospital no. 1 in several services on the south side including psychiatry, medicine, surgery, infectious disease unit, laboratory and isolation unit. But he noted the teaching arrangement with Homer G. Phillips Hospital was less complete and depended on personal relationships in each Service. For example the teaching arrangement with the Surgery Service at Homer G. Phillips was more complete because of the efforts of Robert Elman of the Surgery Department at Washington University School of Medicine to have regular teaching rounds at Homer G. Phillips. Guze notes that desegregation of both facilities led the city to evaluate whether the city needed two large general hospital complexes. A group of black physicians approached Guze in the 1970s about an affiliation, but Guze insisted on conditions that Homer G. Phillips was not prepared to meet then including the right to appoint medical staff.

Guze, Samuel B.

General Hospital 21 Collection

  • RG004
  • Collection
  • 1942-1945

The General Hospital 21 Records is a collection of manuscripts and war memorabilia brought together and preserved by veterans of a military unit. Several of the series were generated as official records of the 21st General Hospital when it was stationed overseas, 1942-1945. But also included are many files and writings compiled or composed by the principal donor, Lee D. Cady, M.D. as late as 1975. The collection is designated a record group because it documents the history of an organization, rather than the career of any particular individual and because this organization at its inception was sponsored by Washington University School of Medicine.

The record group, as processed and described in this inventory by the Archives staff, is comprised of seventeen series. The series include narrative histories and reports, unit newspapers, records of the unit before activation, training materials, transit orders and rosters, files pertaining to each of the overseas duty stations, personnel files, general subject files, maps and plans, and select publications concerning the war and locales where the unit served.

21st General Hospital

Hiromu Tsuchiya Photographs

  • VC011
  • Collection
  • 1935-1962

This collection consists of 16 photographs from the professional life of Dr. Hiromu Tsuchiya (1887-1971). Depicted subjects include portraits of Tsuchiya and his colleagues and Barnes Hospital annual staff photographs.

Tsuchiya, Hiromu

Carl F. and Gerty T. Cori Photographs, Certificates, and Artifacts Collection

  • VC014
  • Collection
  • 1946-1947, 2017

This collection consists of 20 photographs, 2 buttons, and 3 proclamations highlighting the scientific achievements of Carl F. and Gerty T. Cori. The photographs primarily depict the Coris in laboratory settings or receiving honors and awards. The buttons were created to commemorate Gerty T. Cori's life and scientific achievements, and the proclamations are from the City of Glendale, MO; the City of St. Louis, MO; and the State of Missouri marking October 23rd as Gerty and Carl Cori day.

Cori, Carl F.

Margaret G. Smith Photographs and Drawings

  • VC023
  • Collection
  • 1927-1968

This collection consists of 155 photographs, drawings, and certificates documenting the personal and professional life of Margaret G. Smith. Photographs depict Smith, her family, and her colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine,  views of Smith's laboratory and mosquito specimens, and microscopic images of various research specimens. The collection also includes sketches and drawings Smith made as she traveled; most of the sketches depict architecture in Bavaria, Germany. Finally, this collection also includes certificates and awards presented to Smith throughout her career, including a sterling silver tray in recognition of her selection by the St. Louis Globe-Democrat as a Woman of Achievement in Science.

Smith, Margaret G.

Joseph Erlanger Photographs

  • VC027
  • Collection

This collection consists of 54 photographs and 2 postcards depicting the professional life and scientific achievements of Dr. Joseph Erlanger. Depicted subjects include formal portraits of Erlanger, scenes from a dinner hosted by President John F. and Jackie Kennedy at the White House for Nobel Laureates, studio views of Erlanger's Nobel Prize medal and certificate, and scenes from the presentation of Erlanger's papers to Washington University School of Medicine's Library in 1963.

Erlanger, Joseph

Evarts A. Graham Photographs

  • VC029
  • Collection
  • 1920-1957

This collection consists of 166 photographs and glass lantern slides depicting the professional life of Evarts A. Graham. Primarily the photographs depict portraits of Graham, as well as various scenes of Graham lecturing to students, performing surgery, working with patients, and with colleagues at dinners or conferences.The collection also includes Barnes Hospital Surgical Staff photographs, interior views of Graham's office taken just after his death, and photographs sent to Graham from former students. The glass slides in the collection primarily depict demonstrations of a postural drainage table in various positions, and chest x-rays and microscopic views of lung tissue from Dr. James Gilmore.

Graham, Evarts A. (Evarts Ambrose), 1883-1957

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