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William Swekowsky Photographs

  • VC221
  • Collection

This collection consists of 7 photographs by St. Louis dentist William G. Swekowsky of scenes associated with John Gano Bryan (friend of Joseph Nash McDowell), George Engelmann, Frederick Adolphus Wislizenus, and the Barnes Medical College.

Swekowsky, William

William M. McPheeters Diary

  • FC097
  • Collection
  • 1840-1856

William McPheeter's bound handrwitten diary. A diary recorded during residency at the Philadelphia Hospital at Blockley (the Philadelphia Alms House Hospital, later Philadelphia General Hospital). Entries concerning the Blockley service begin 25 May 1840, end 19 April 1841. Subsequent entries relate to McPheeters's move and early professional career in St. Louis, and are dated 1841-1856.

McPheeters, William M.

William M. Landau Papers

  • FC119
  • Collection
  • 1951-2010

Accession 2017-037: William M. Landau Papers (FC119): 8 record cartons and 5 oversized framed items. Box 1-2, personal and professional correspondence, circa 1980-2010, Box 3, framed items, videos and audio recordings of lectures, Boxes 4-8 scientific equipment from Landau's and George Bishop's laboratories.

This small collection includes a few transcripts of speeches given by Dr. Landau at various meetings, reprints, and documentation regarding Dr. Landau’s role in PNHP in Missouri (Physicians for a National Health Program).  See also oral history numbers OH090 and OH107 for Dr. Landau's oral histories.

Landau, William M.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH107)

  • OH107
  • Collection
  • June 15, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey, James Carter, and William Guideman, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes. See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau discusses his experience with segregation in St. Louis as a child and as medical student, house officer, and resident at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine as background to the desegregation of hospitals and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He recalls the desegregation of Barnes Hospital was set in motion by David Goldring, Alexis Hartman Sr. and ? Park White trained African American pediatricians through his world class pediatric residency program at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in the 1940s. Park White also fought get black kids into St. Louis Children's Hospital and his own African American residents as medical staff. Landau recalls the first black medical student's admission in 1951 and his failure due in part to poor preparation but more significantly to a hostile environment. George Saslow, a psychiatrist and head of the outpatient clinic, was key in building a better environment for subsequent black applicants and students.

Landau, William M.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH090)

  • OH090
  • Collection
  • April 27, 2006

Landau discusses his experiences working with the Washington University School of Medicine's Program in Physical Therapy.
Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 14 minutes.  See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau, William M.

William K. Hall Papers

  • FC107
  • Collection
  • 1973-1984

The collection consists of an unbound typescript manuscript, "History of dermatology in St. Louis, Missouri" (1973, 274 leaves) and a later bound version of the manuscript, "Dermatology and Dermatologists in St. Louis" ([1984], 372 leaves). The earlier version contains photographs, letters, clippings, and other documents. Both versions are indexed. Included are histories of the Barnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital, the Barnes Hospital dermatology staff, and the St. Louis Dermatological Society, and biographical information about 19th and 20th century St. Louis dermatologists.

Hall, William K.

William B. Kountz Photographs and Certificates

  • VC132
  • Collection
  • 1953-1961

This collection consists of 1 photograph and 4 certificates, including membership certificates and an invitation to William B. Kountz to the 1961 White House Conference on Aging.

Kountz, William B.

Willard M. Allen Photographs

  • VC335
  • Collection
  • 1971

This collection consists of 4 photographs and artifacts from a St. Louis Medical Society meeting on January 5, 1971, during which Willard M. Allen was awarded the St. Louis Medical Society Award of Merit.

Allen, Willard M.

Walter C. G. Kirchner Reprints

  • FC096
  • Collection
  • 1898-1939

Forty short publications on fossil flora, bacteriology, surgery and medicine by Walter C.G. Kirchner and a few short publications by Arthur Hollick, Elizabeth Britten, and others. The subjects of the medical and surgical reprints include heart and spleen surgery and the treatment of fractured skull and spine, hernia, bowel obstruction, aneurisms, ascites, and wounds to the diaphragm, heart, chest, and abdomen. A table of contents and index for the publications are bound into the volume. A short letter from D.S. Brown of Brownhurst to Walter C. G. Kirchner, 1898, is bound after fossil plant reprints as item 1d. Of special interest is the annual report of the city hospital (1907-08) and Clinic at City Hospital (1906) where Kirchner was superintendent from 1907-1910. Also of interest is "The Bacterial Examination of River Water." (1905), based on work done when he was assistant bacteriologist in the Health department of St. Louis, 1899-1901.

Kirchner, Walter C. G.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH102)

  • OH102
  • Collection

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 49 minutes. Interviewers, Bill Geideman and James Carter.

Guze discusses his experience with segregation and desegregation of Barnes Hospital, Renard Hospital, its psychiatric service and unit. He guessed the psychiatric service desegregated the Barnes Hospital psychiatric unit in October 1953.

He and the interviewers had a clearer timeline for desegregation of admission of medical students to the Washington University School of Medicine. He said the executive faculty gave the admissions committee discretion in flexible criteria for admission for those with disadvantaged educational background. Roy Vagelos of Biochemistry was a key player on the Executive Faculty along with John Herweg, who headed the admissions committee starting in the early 1960s. Guze recalled that the first African American medical student (1953?) had difficulty and the second had no difficulty, but the executive faculty wanted more African Americans admitted and numbers did not start to go up significantly until about 1968. This was due to the hiring of Bob Lee, Dean of Minority Affairs, whose sole responsibility at first was minority students.

Guze discusses the parallel but related desegregation of the St. Louis City Hospital and health care systems. He notes that the segregated city healthcare system included two large general hospitals, Homer G. Phillips (St. Louis City Hospital no. 2) built in 1937 on the north side for African-Americans and older St. Louis City Hospital (no. 1 or Max Starkloff) for whites on the south side. He said there was one psychiatric unit at the Malcolm Bliss Center for whites and a separate psychiatric unit for blacks run by black psychiatrists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. And he recalled that there was a long-standing formal teaching arrangement with 'Max Starkloff or St. Louis City Hospital no. 1 in several services on the south side including psychiatry, medicine, surgery, infectious disease unit, laboratory and isolation unit. But he noted the teaching arrangement with Homer G. Phillips Hospital was less complete and depended on personal relationships in each Service. For example the teaching arrangement with the Surgery Service at Homer G. Phillips was more complete because of the efforts of Robert Elman of the Surgery Department at Washington University School of Medicine to have regular teaching rounds at Homer G. Phillips. Guze notes that desegregation of both facilities led the city to evaluate whether the city needed two large general hospital complexes. A group of black physicians approached Guze in the 1970s about an affiliation, but Guze insisted on conditions that Homer G. Phillips was not prepared to meet then including the right to appoint medical staff.

Guze, Samuel B.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH065)

  • OH065
  • Collection
  • October 11, 1989

Interviewed by Richard W. Hudgens in 1989.

This is a five part interview on the history of the Neuropsychiatry department and the psychiatry department of Washington University School of Medicine. Part 1 begins with questions on the neuropsychiatry department in World War II beginning with Edward Gildea. He was a proponent of biological psychiatry, but was tolerant of the psychoanalysts on staff like his wife Margaret Gildea. Guze discusses the dynamic between the biologically oriented faculty Gildea appointed such as George Saslow, Eli Robins and George Winokur and himself. He also mentions George Ulett and David Graham. Guze explains how he got into psychiatry, when his initial goal was to be an internist. He also describes in the end of part 1 and beginning of part 2 how in 1955, Guze, Robins and Winokur, the three assistant professor in Psychiatry in 1955 went to Gildea with their plan for a biologically oriented psychiatry department. Gildea was supportive and they divided up duties. In the training of students, biological psychiatry emphasizes diagnosis and research, clinical studies of etiology including neuropathology, pharmacology, and neurochemistry. Eli Robins was the prime mover in the movement on regularizing diagnostic criteria. At the end of part 2, Guze discusses Gildeas strengths and weaknesses and is asked about Gildea's conflict with James O'Leary. Guze is asked how Eli Robins became head of the new Psychiatry Department. Dr. Ulett was also a contender for department chair. in part 3, Guze discusses Robins era and the effect of Eli's multiple sclerosis on his own research and the psychiatry department. In part 5, Guze discusses how he met Joy Guze, his wife and his childhood especially parents and grandparents and schooling. Antisemitic quotas affected admission to medical schools particularly before World War II.

Guze, Samuel B.

Saint Louis City Hospital Photographs

  • VC332
  • Collection
  • 1886-1932

This collection consists of 10 photographs depicting group portraits of St. Louis City Hospital interns and House Staff, taken between circa 1886 and 1932.

St. Louis City Hospital

Robert E. Shank Oral History

  • OH044
  • Collection
  • 6/27/1980

Shank discusses his student years at the Washington University School of Medicine and his research with Dr. David Barr; his research at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research during World War II; and his postwar research at the Public Health Research Institute for the City of New York. The conversation then focuses on the major research focus of Shank’s career – nutritional studies. Shank relates his experiences conducting nutritional study research in Newfoundland; the study of nutrition during war and the necessity of providing proper nutrition to troops; public health surveys conducted overseas under the auspices of the Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense (ICNND); and his experiences as participant and consultant to the Public Health Service and the Indian Health Service. Shank comments on the challenge of improving nutrition standards in developing countries with steadily increasing populations and the role of the National Research Council and the Food Nutrition Board in the development of standards of recommended dietary allowances of nutrients. He also discusses the growth of the vitamin industry, nutrition in prepared and baby foods, and obesity. The discussion then covers the development of the WUSM Department of Preventive Medicine while Shank was its head – the Irene Walter Johnson Institute of Rehabilitation, the Medical Care Group under its initial director Gerald Perkoff, the division of biostatistics, Health Care Research, applied physiology, epidemiology, and lipid research. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on June 27, 1980. OH044. Approximate Length 130 minutes.

Shank, Robert E.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • FC125
  • Collection

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine.

Drews, Robert C.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • OH043
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH043. Approximate length 63 minutes.

Drews, Robert C.

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