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Saint Louis (Mo.)
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Aaron J. Steele Papers

  • FC010
  • Collection

Two diplomas: Humboldt Medical College, 1868; Missouri Medical College, 1898 (honorary).  Also one certificate from the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, 1890 signed by Rutherford Hayes.  See also VC098.

Steele, A. J. (Aaron John), 1835-1917

Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • OH023
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

Adele B. Croninger Papers

  • FC069
  • Collection
  • 1938-1959

Reprint collection of scientific publications. Most are related to smoking in relation to lung cancer, carcinoma. Most reprints are in English. Also one folder of laboratory notes on tar and radiation experiments.

Croninger, Adele B.

Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity Records

  • PC050
  • Collection
  • 1905-1957

The record group concerns the selection of medical students for the society and the development of the local chapter. The records list many members who became prominent in their fields. The Alpha Omega Alpha fraternity records consist of three volumes, 1905-1957, that include the initial charter and constitution and by-laws, minutes of chapter meetings, treasury records, chapter membership lists, other by-laws, correspondence, and publications. See also the The Hatchet (1923-1931) and the Archives vertical file (1938-1992) for more information on this student organization.

Alpha Omega Alpha. Alpha of Missouri Chapter

American Medical College publications and photographs, 1875-1912.

American Medical College was organized in 1873.  Its backers were promoters of “eclecticism,” which was an approach to therapeutics that emphasized herbal remedies.  The first class graduated in 1874, when instruction was offered at 7th and Olive Streets.  The college admitted two classes each subsequent year up to 1883, thereafter a single class annually but with a longer term of instruction.  From 1878 until 1890 the institution was located at 310 North 11th Street in St. Louis, and then moved to 407 S. Jefferson Avenue.  Some time around 1900 the faculty staffed what was billed as “the only eclectic hospital in the west,” Metropolitan Hospital, but this facility evidently did not remain open long.  Flexner graded American along with several other Missouri medical schools as “utterly wretched” following his visit in 1909.  In 1910 the college abandoned eclecticism and formally embraced “regular” medicine.  The college purchased a new building and also opened a second hospital and a dispensary on Pine Street at Theresa Avenue.  Again the clinical facilities were short-lived.  In 1911 American merged with nearby Barnes University.  The combined institution was renamed National University in 1912.

American Medical College of St. Louis

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • OH026
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1976

The three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 24, 1976. OH026. Approximate Length 87 minutes.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

Andrew B. Barbee Papers

  • FC048
  • Collection
  • 1843-1879

Photocopies of memoir and letters of Barbee dating from the mid-1800s. Memoir includes descriptions of the cholera epidemics of 1849 and 1866.

Barbee, Andrew B.

Andrew B. Jones Drawings, Photographs and Artifacts

  • VC106
  • Collection

This collection consists of 8 drawings, photographs, and artifacts from Andrew B. Jones. The photographs are group portraits of Barnes Hospital staff and Washington University School of Medicine faculty, the drawings depict the human peripheral nervous system, and the artifact is a human skull used by Jones for anatomical study.

Jones, Andrew B.

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

In his oral history interview, Jones discusses some of his experiences as a medical officer during World War I. He also recalls some of the changes he witnessed over the years in the field of neurology and at the Washington University School of Medicine. Jones recalls some of his colleagues, such as Vilray P. Blair, George Dock, Ernest Sachs, and Sidney Schwab.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes. Grace Jones (Mrs. Andrew B. Jones) was also present and spoke during the interview.

Jones, Andrew B.

Arthur E. Strauss Oral History

  • OH076
  • Collection
  • 9/18/1959

Strauss begins by discussing otolaryngologist Hanau W. Loeb and his role in the early history of St. Louis University Medical School and the development of Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. While relating being called in to help treat Loeb, Strauss discusses his training as a cardiologist and describes the first electrocardiograms. He relates his experiences leading up to his service in World War I and his experiences during the war working as a cardiologist in England and France. Strauss recalls returning to St. Louis after the war and his subsequent work as head of the cardiac clinic at Washington University and at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Strauss talks about his interactions with several prominent early physicians and cardiologists, including Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and James McKenzie. The conversation returns to the discussion of Hanau Loeb, and Strauss reads a published tribute to Loeb written by prominent St. Louis rabbi Leon Harrison. Strauss recalls two men who influenced him in his career as a physician, Jesse S. Myer and Albert E. Taussig. The interviewers and Strauss then talk about generational changes in medical training and practice, including the lack of exposure to medical “greats” and the lack of respect shown by local hospital house staffs. Some of the audio recording is distorted (at approximately 71 minutes in); the volume of the recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Gerhard E. Gruenfeld and Barrett L. Taussig on September 18, 1959. OH076. Approximate Length 147 minutes.

Strauss, Arthur E.

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • OH047
  • Collection
  • 10/17/1980

Arthur Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on October 17, 1980. OH047. Approximate Length 39 minutes.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • FC126
  • Collection

Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Barnes Hospital Medical House Staff Photographs

  • VC313
  • Collection
  • 1963-1987

This collection consists of 30 composite portraits of Barnes Hospital staff, 1963-1987. Portraits include Private Medical Service House Staff, Ward Medical Service House Staff, Interns, Residents, and General Surgery Staff.

Barnes Hospital (Saint. Louis, Mo.)

Barnes Hospital Medical Staff Photographs

  • VC305
  • Collection
  • 1916-1952

This collection consists of 43 group portraits of Barnes Hospital Medical and Surgical staff from 1919-1952.

Barnes Hospital (Saint. Louis, Mo.)

Barnes Hospital Records

  • RG009
  • Collection
  • 1836-2007

This collection includes items related to Barnes Hospital. From the bequest which funded the creation of the hospital; to the hospital’s opening at the end of 1914; and continuing up to and beyond its merger with Jewish Hospital in 1996, the history of Barnes Hospital is documented in a variety of material formats. The collection includes administrative records; staff correspondence; hospital publications; newspaper and magazine clippings; scrapbooks; photographs; VHS tapes; and artifacts. Of note is the collection of hospital publications ( series 4), which includes serial magazines and annual reports of the hospital, as well as ephemera such as brochures and flyers. Also noteworthy is the hospital superintendent’s correspondence collection ( _series 3)_covering the years 1913-1926; the hospital’s book of forms from the year of its opening ( series 1); a scrapbook containing correspondence of Robert A. Barnes and the original trustees of Barnes Hospital ( _series 8);_and the Hospital's Staff Register covering October 13, 1915 to January 13, 1958 ( series 5).

Barnes Hospital (Saint. Louis, Mo.)

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