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Archival description
Only top-level descriptions Saint Louis (Mo.)
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General Hospital 21 Collection

  • RG004
  • Collection
  • 1942-1945

The General Hospital 21 Records is a collection of manuscripts and war memorabilia brought together and preserved by veterans of a military unit. Several of the series were generated as official records of the 21st General Hospital when it was stationed overseas, 1942-1945. But also included are many files and writings compiled or composed by the principal donor, Lee D. Cady, M.D. as late as 1975. The collection is designated a record group because it documents the history of an organization, rather than the career of any particular individual and because this organization at its inception was sponsored by Washington University School of Medicine.

The record group, as processed and described in this inventory by the Archives staff, is comprised of seventeen series. The series include narrative histories and reports, unit newspapers, records of the unit before activation, training materials, transit orders and rosters, files pertaining to each of the overseas duty stations, personnel files, general subject files, maps and plans, and select publications concerning the war and locales where the unit served.

21st General Hospital

Ben H. Senturia Photographs and Artifacts

  • VC062
  • Collection
  • 1933-1965

This collection consists of 83 photographs, negatives, and artifacts related to Ben H. Senturia. Many of the photographs and all of the negatives depict unidentified men and women at meetings, conferences, and parties. Photographs also include group portraits with Ben H. Senturia, including groups at conferences, Senturia with classmates, and group portraits of Barnes Hospital medical staff. Artifacts include two human skulls, and a medal for a nasal speculum designed by Senturia.

Senturia, Ben H.

William B. Kountz Photographs and Certificates

  • VC132
  • Collection
  • 1953-1961

This collection consists of 1 photograph and 4 certificates, including membership certificates and an invitation to William B. Kountz to the 1961 White House Conference on Aging.

Kountz, William B.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH102)

  • OH102
  • Collection

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 49 minutes. Interviewers, Bill Geideman and James Carter.

Guze discusses his experience with segregation and desegregation of Barnes Hospital, Renard Hospital, its psychiatric service and unit. He guessed the psychiatric service desegregated the Barnes Hospital psychiatric unit in October 1953.

He and the interviewers had a clearer timeline for desegregation of admission of medical students to the Washington University School of Medicine. He said the executive faculty gave the admissions committee discretion in flexible criteria for admission for those with disadvantaged educational background. Roy Vagelos of Biochemistry was a key player on the Executive Faculty along with John Herweg, who headed the admissions committee starting in the early 1960s. Guze recalled that the first African American medical student (1953?) had difficulty and the second had no difficulty, but the executive faculty wanted more African Americans admitted and numbers did not start to go up significantly until about 1968. This was due to the hiring of Bob Lee, Dean of Minority Affairs, whose sole responsibility at first was minority students.

Guze discusses the parallel but related desegregation of the St. Louis City Hospital and health care systems. He notes that the segregated city healthcare system included two large general hospitals, Homer G. Phillips (St. Louis City Hospital no. 2) built in 1937 on the north side for African-Americans and older St. Louis City Hospital (no. 1 or Max Starkloff) for whites on the south side. He said there was one psychiatric unit at the Malcolm Bliss Center for whites and a separate psychiatric unit for blacks run by black psychiatrists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. And he recalled that there was a long-standing formal teaching arrangement with 'Max Starkloff or St. Louis City Hospital no. 1 in several services on the south side including psychiatry, medicine, surgery, infectious disease unit, laboratory and isolation unit. But he noted the teaching arrangement with Homer G. Phillips Hospital was less complete and depended on personal relationships in each Service. For example the teaching arrangement with the Surgery Service at Homer G. Phillips was more complete because of the efforts of Robert Elman of the Surgery Department at Washington University School of Medicine to have regular teaching rounds at Homer G. Phillips. Guze notes that desegregation of both facilities led the city to evaluate whether the city needed two large general hospital complexes. A group of black physicians approached Guze in the 1970s about an affiliation, but Guze insisted on conditions that Homer G. Phillips was not prepared to meet then including the right to appoint medical staff.

Guze, Samuel B.

Willard M. Allen Photographs

  • VC335
  • Collection
  • 1971

This collection consists of 4 photographs and artifacts from a St. Louis Medical Society meeting on January 5, 1971, during which Willard M. Allen was awarded the St. Louis Medical Society Award of Merit.

Allen, Willard M.

Carl F. and Gerty T. Cori Photographs, Certificates, and Artifacts Collection

  • VC014
  • Collection
  • 1946-1947, 2017

This collection consists of 20 photographs, 2 buttons, and 3 proclamations highlighting the scientific achievements of Carl F. and Gerty T. Cori. The photographs primarily depict the Coris in laboratory settings or receiving honors and awards. The buttons were created to commemorate Gerty T. Cori's life and scientific achievements, and the proclamations are from the City of Glendale, MO; the City of St. Louis, MO; and the State of Missouri marking October 23rd as Gerty and Carl Cori day.

Cori, Carl F.

Evarts A. Graham Symposium Photographs

  • VC147
  • Collection
  • 1983

This collection consists of 121 photographs and 1 commemorative medallion from the Evarts A. Graham Symposium honoring the centennial of his birth. The photographs depict scenes from the symposium and reception. The medallion depicts a profile portrait of Evarts A. Graham.

[VC143]

Helen B. Burch Photographs

  • VC041
  • Collection
  • 1948-1986

This collection consists of 31 photographs depicting scenes from the professional career of Helen B. Burch. The photographs primarily depict Burch and colleagues conducting research in the Philippines and Guatemala.

Burch, Helen B.

David A. Gee Papers

  • FC105
  • Collection
  • 1949-1992

Publications by Gee, including short academic papers, articles about the hospital, and two narrative histories of the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, "216 S. K." (1981) and "Working Wonders: a history of the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, 1891-1992" (1992). Also included are speeches by Gee (1965-1980).

Gee, David A.

David Goldring Oral History

  • OH101
  • Collection
  • July 20, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 19 minutes.

David Goldrings relates stories he heard and his own experience with the admission of black children to St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

He begins with stories he heard about the attitude of chiefs of pediatrics, hospital administrators, and hospital board toward the admission of black children to children’s Hospital. John Howland was the first chief of pediatrics at the Hospital and he left to go to Johns Hopkins Hospital after 6 months because the Hospital board was opposed to the admission of black children to the hospital. This situation changed when St. Louis Children's Hospital opened the Butler Ward, a black only ward in 1923.

David Goldring’s own experience began with his internship and residency in 1941-1944. One night, a black child needed an incubator and there was none in the Butler ward. So David Goldring admitted him to the infant ward. Estelle Claiborne told David Goldring that this was the sort of thing that got interns fired and reported it to Alexis Hartmann Sr., his chief of pediatrics by a phone call. She was quite angry that Hartmann let the admission stand, but integration did not happen frequently in the war years.

Integration of the staff of St. Louis Children's Hospital began with the Nash family. Helen Nash joined the medical staff in 1949 and Homer Nash in 1955. For years before, Park J. White was committed to the training of African American interns and residents as an attending physician for 25 years at Homer G. Phillips. David Goldring and Neil Middlecamp were aso attendings in pediatrics at Homer G. Phillips Hospital for about 10 years.

Goldring, David

William M. Landau Oral History (OH090)

  • OH090
  • Collection
  • April 27, 2006

Landau discusses his experiences working with the Washington University School of Medicine's Program in Physical Therapy.
Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 14 minutes.  See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau, William M.

Robert C. Drews Papers

  • FC181
  • Collection
  • 1954

Script of the WUSM Class of 1955 show, the Junior-Senior Fray, performed April 24, 1954.

Drews, Robert C.

John A. Pierce Oral History

  • FC128
  • Collection

Pierce discusses the career of his colleague Alfred Goldman, a 1920 graduate of the Washington University School of Medicine and, for fifty years, a member of the clinical faculty of the school. Pierce describes some of Goldman’s early research on the effect of chilling on the development of upper respiratory disease, the physiology of hyperventilation, and tetany. Goldman’s great skill working and relating to both his patients and with students is described. Pierce comments on Goldman’s careful scholarship and tenacity as a researcher as well as his dedication to his family and to his patients.

Pierce, John A.

Henry G. Schwartz Photographs

  • VC102
  • Collection
  • 1931-1985

This collection consists of 85 photographs documenting the personal and professional life of Henry G. Schwartz. Many of the images in the collection are digital surrogates of the the original photographs that primarily depict scenes with Schwartz and other men and women serving as United States Army officers in World War II. Additional digital images depict two young boys playing outside and posing on the steps of a house. The other photographs in the collection are primarily portraits of friends and colleagues of Schwartz, including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, Ernest Sachs, Sidney I. Schwab, and Evarts A. Graham. Those photographs (VC102069-084) are also arranged and described as Series 5 in the Henry G. Schwartz Papers (FC112).

Schwartz, Henry G.

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