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Only top-level descriptions Saint Louis (Mo.)
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William K. Hall Papers

  • FC107
  • Collection
  • 1973-1984

The collection consists of an unbound typescript manuscript, "History of dermatology in St. Louis, Missouri" (1973, 274 leaves) and a later bound version of the manuscript, "Dermatology and Dermatologists in St. Louis" ([1984], 372 leaves). The earlier version contains photographs, letters, clippings, and other documents. Both versions are indexed. Included are histories of the Barnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital, the Barnes Hospital dermatology staff, and the St. Louis Dermatological Society, and biographical information about 19th and 20th century St. Louis dermatologists.

Hall, William K.

Viktor Hamburger Oral History

  • FC132
  • Collection
  • June 30, 1983

Hamburger discusses major points in his long career as an embryologist – his early work in Germany with Hans Spemann and the study of the organizer effect; his experience coming to the United States in 1932 as a Rockefeller fellow and staying on after Hitler’s “cleansing of the professions” in Germany; joining the faculty of Washington University and his research there. Hamburger talks about his colleagues such as Rita Levi-Montalcini and their discovery of naturally occurring neuronal death, his work with Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen on the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF), and his study of animal behavior development and motility.

Hamburger, Viktor

H. Rommel Hildreth Oral History

  • FC134
  • Collection
  • 8 April 1981

Hildreth discusses the dispute between the Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital in the early 1960s, and the roles of Edgar M. Queeny (chairman of the Trustees of Barnes Hospital), Edward W. Dempsey (dean of the medical school), consultants Joseph Hinsey and John H. Knowles, and Washington University chancellor George Pake. Hildreth also talks about some of the faculty of the medical school while he was a student in the mid-1920s, such as Evarts A. Graham and Joseph Erlanger.

Hildreth, H. Rommel

Richard W. Hudgens Papers

  • FC136
  • Collection

This small collection includes a presentation Dr. Hudgens gave during the Psychiatry Department grand rounds on October 24, 2000, titled "On the shoulders of giants, a tribute to Samuel B. Guze". An additional accession includes various items related to the School of Medicine student musical "New Facies of 1955" that was organized by the WUSM Class of 1956. Items include three 33 1/3 vinyl records recorded on April 16, 1955, a photograph of Dr. Hudgens singing during the musical, and song lyrics that have been edited by Dr. Hudgens. This collection also includes a brief typed description of Dr. Hudgens experience as a medical student at WUSM (1952-1956) written by Dr. Hudgens.

Hudgens, Richard W.

Lorraine Lake Papers

  • FC151
  • Collection
  • 1954-1999

The collection contains Lorraine Lake’s MA thesis and PhD dissertation, correspondence from when she was faculty in the Program in Physical Therapy and associate director of the Irene Walter Johnson Institute of Rehabilitation, and a scrapbook and other materials related to the IWJ Institute of Rehabilitation.

Lake, Lorraine F.

Oliver H. Lowry Oral History

  • FC137
  • Collection
  • June 16, 1972

Lowry discusses the life and work of Helen Tredway Graham, a member of the department of pharmacology of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1925-1971. Lowry discusses their work together studying histamines.

Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on June 16, 1972. 7 minutes

Lowry, Oliver H.

Wendell G. Scott Papers

  • FC015
  • Collection
  • 1935-1972

Correspondence, speeches, lectures, notebooks, certificates, reprints, clippings and photos relating to radiology, neoplasms, cholecystography, kymography, mammography and hospital administration. Includes material on various national and international organizations with which Dr. Scott was associated.

Scott, Wendell G., 1905-1972

Philip A. Shaffer Papers

  • FC005
  • Collection
  • 1910-1958

The Shaffer papers include ten document series including correspondence, diaries, scrapbooks, short publications, notes, and his Ph.D. dissertation. Major subjects are his research work in biochemistry and the administration of WUSM as dean and head of the Department of Biological Chemistry. His work with Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Children’s Hospital, American Society of Biological Chemists and the U. S. Army in World War I are also subjects.

In 2006, this collection contained many deteriorated brittle carbon copies on newsprint and newspaper clippings that chipped or fractured with minimal handling. The acidic newsprint had stained surrounding documents and was losing contrast due to browning. Archives staff made acid-free photocopies to preserve content and contrast for future use and preservation microfilming.

Shaffer, Philip A.

John Green Papers

  • FC030
  • Collection
  • 1861-1905

Summary: Collection includes a manuscript on astigmatism, a book of patient records, and a selection of publications on various ophthalmological problems and hospital administration.

Green, John, 1835-1913

David A. Gee Papers

  • FC105
  • Collection
  • 1949-1992

Publications by Gee, including short academic papers, articles about the hospital, and two narrative histories of the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, "216 S. K." (1981) and "Working Wonders: a history of the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, 1891-1992" (1992). Also included are speeches by Gee (1965-1980).

Gee, David A.

Lawrence W. O'Neal Papers

  • FC145
  • Collection
  • 1952-2002

Files pertaining to "Mission to Thailand," ("Our Heritage" series, St. Louis Metropolitan Medicine, 2002, July,:2001). They include 2002 letters from Ben Eiseman and Frank Vellios. The letters contain their reminiscences of Washington University program in Thailand in the early 1950s as part of the Medical Education Exchange Program. Documents from 1952 Dean's correspondence are a controversial "Coronet" magazine article on Eiseman, March 1952 and Robert A. Moore's report on medical education in Thailand.

O'Neal, Lawrence W.

John A. Pierce Oral History

  • FC128
  • Collection

Pierce discusses the career of his colleague Alfred Goldman, a 1920 graduate of the Washington University School of Medicine and, for fifty years, a member of the clinical faculty of the school. Pierce describes some of Goldman’s early research on the effect of chilling on the development of upper respiratory disease, the physiology of hyperventilation, and tetany. Goldman’s great skill working and relating to both his patients and with students is described. Pierce comments on Goldman’s careful scholarship and tenacity as a researcher as well as his dedication to his family and to his patients.

Pierce, John A.

Baumgarten Family Drawings

  • VC117
  • Collection

This collection consists of 43 drawings, graphs, and maps from the Baumgarten family, including several drawings of cells, bones, griffins and other mythical creatures, and medical graphs and drawings by Gustav Baumgarten.

Baumgarten family

Willard M. Allen Photographs

  • VC335
  • Collection
  • 1971

This collection consists of 4 photographs and artifacts from a St. Louis Medical Society meeting on January 5, 1971, during which Willard M. Allen was awarded the St. Louis Medical Society Award of Merit.

Allen, Willard M.

David Goldring Oral History

  • OH101
  • Collection
  • July 20, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 19 minutes.

David Goldrings relates stories he heard and his own experience with the admission of black children to St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

He begins with stories he heard about the attitude of chiefs of pediatrics, hospital administrators, and hospital board toward the admission of black children to children’s Hospital. John Howland was the first chief of pediatrics at the Hospital and he left to go to Johns Hopkins Hospital after 6 months because the Hospital board was opposed to the admission of black children to the hospital. This situation changed when St. Louis Children's Hospital opened the Butler Ward, a black only ward in 1923.

David Goldring’s own experience began with his internship and residency in 1941-1944. One night, a black child needed an incubator and there was none in the Butler ward. So David Goldring admitted him to the infant ward. Estelle Claiborne told David Goldring that this was the sort of thing that got interns fired and reported it to Alexis Hartmann Sr., his chief of pediatrics by a phone call. She was quite angry that Hartmann let the admission stand, but integration did not happen frequently in the war years.

Integration of the staff of St. Louis Children's Hospital began with the Nash family. Helen Nash joined the medical staff in 1949 and Homer Nash in 1955. For years before, Park J. White was committed to the training of African American interns and residents as an attending physician for 25 years at Homer G. Phillips. David Goldring and Neil Middlecamp were aso attendings in pediatrics at Homer G. Phillips Hospital for about 10 years.

Goldring, David

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH102)

  • OH102
  • Collection

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 49 minutes. Interviewers, Bill Geideman and James Carter.

Guze discusses his experience with segregation and desegregation of Barnes Hospital, Renard Hospital, its psychiatric service and unit. He guessed the psychiatric service desegregated the Barnes Hospital psychiatric unit in October 1953.

He and the interviewers had a clearer timeline for desegregation of admission of medical students to the Washington University School of Medicine. He said the executive faculty gave the admissions committee discretion in flexible criteria for admission for those with disadvantaged educational background. Roy Vagelos of Biochemistry was a key player on the Executive Faculty along with John Herweg, who headed the admissions committee starting in the early 1960s. Guze recalled that the first African American medical student (1953?) had difficulty and the second had no difficulty, but the executive faculty wanted more African Americans admitted and numbers did not start to go up significantly until about 1968. This was due to the hiring of Bob Lee, Dean of Minority Affairs, whose sole responsibility at first was minority students.

Guze discusses the parallel but related desegregation of the St. Louis City Hospital and health care systems. He notes that the segregated city healthcare system included two large general hospitals, Homer G. Phillips (St. Louis City Hospital no. 2) built in 1937 on the north side for African-Americans and older St. Louis City Hospital (no. 1 or Max Starkloff) for whites on the south side. He said there was one psychiatric unit at the Malcolm Bliss Center for whites and a separate psychiatric unit for blacks run by black psychiatrists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. And he recalled that there was a long-standing formal teaching arrangement with 'Max Starkloff or St. Louis City Hospital no. 1 in several services on the south side including psychiatry, medicine, surgery, infectious disease unit, laboratory and isolation unit. But he noted the teaching arrangement with Homer G. Phillips Hospital was less complete and depended on personal relationships in each Service. For example the teaching arrangement with the Surgery Service at Homer G. Phillips was more complete because of the efforts of Robert Elman of the Surgery Department at Washington University School of Medicine to have regular teaching rounds at Homer G. Phillips. Guze notes that desegregation of both facilities led the city to evaluate whether the city needed two large general hospital complexes. A group of black physicians approached Guze in the 1970s about an affiliation, but Guze insisted on conditions that Homer G. Phillips was not prepared to meet then including the right to appoint medical staff.

Guze, Samuel B.

Richard W. Hudgens Oral History

  • OH049
  • Collection
  • 4/28/1981

Hudgens relates some of his experiences as a student at WUSM in the 1950s and some of his influential professors, such as Edward Dempsey, Carl Moore, George Saslow, and Sam Guze. Hudgens also discusses the development of his interest in psychiatry, his medical residencies in Virginia and North Carolina, his experiences as a staff psychiatrist at the U.S. Air Force Hospital at Lackland AFB in Texas, and his experiences on the faculty and in the administration of the Washington University School of Medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 28, 1981. OH049. Approximate Length 59 minutes.

Hudgens, Richard W.

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

In his oral history interview, Jones discusses some of his experiences as a medical officer during World War I. He also recalls some of the changes he witnessed over the years in the field of neurology and at the Washington University School of Medicine. Jones recalls some of his colleagues, such as Vilray P. Blair, George Dock, Ernest Sachs, and Sidney Schwab.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes. Grace Jones (Mrs. Andrew B. Jones) was also present and spoke during the interview.

Jones, Andrew B.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH090)

  • OH090
  • Collection
  • April 27, 2006

Landau discusses his experiences working with the Washington University School of Medicine's Program in Physical Therapy.
Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 14 minutes.  See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau, William M.

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