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Archival description
History, 20th century English
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Thomas H. Burford Papers

  • FC028
  • Collection
  • 1936-1973

The Burford papers consist of six series. They contain information on chest and cancer surgery, other areas of surgical practice, the Washington University Department of Surgery, the university administration, the American Board of Thoracic Surgery and files gathered in tribute to Evarts A. Graham. The material includes correspondence, manuscripts, reports, reprints of articles, and films. The Library’s visual collections include photographs illustrating Burford’s career.

Burford, Thomas H. (Thomas Hanahan), 1907-1977

Gerty T. Cori Papers

  • FC053
  • Collection
  • 1911-1973

The papers consist of three series: 1. General files, 1952-1973; 2. Letters from J.K. Parnas, 1932-1947; and 3. Reprints, 1911-1945. General Files contain bibliographies of Gerty Cori, letters to Herman Kalckar, and selected transcript including “This I believe, 1952”

Cori, Gerty T.

E. V. Cowdry Papers

  • FC008
  • Collection
  • 1909-1975

The Cowdry papers consist of 74 document series of various lengths, most of which are on paper. The arrangement of the series reflect various phases, locales, and time periods of his long career. In terms of subjects, the collection concerns a variety of basic scientific and clinical areas, among them anatomy, cytology, gerontology, cancers, arteriosclerosis, leprosy, and yellow fever. There is an extensive array of important institutions that figure prominently in this collection: Peking Union Medical College, China Medical Board, Rockefeller Institute, American Society for the Aged, Carnegie Corporation, National Research Council, American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, International Cancer Research Council, International Union Against Cancer, American Association for Cancer Research, City of Hope Medical Center (Los Angeles), Tata Memorial Hospital (Bombay), International Association of Gerontology, International Gerontological Congresses, Gerontological Society, Bermuda Biological Station for Research, and the Institutum Divi Thomae Foundation. Of local interest there is material on Washington University School of Medicine administration, the Department of Anatomy and its Division of Cytology, Barnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital, and Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Formats of documents comprising the collection include correspondence, departmental records, notebooks, scrapbooks, manuscripts, certificates, photographs, and press clippings. In addition, certain series represent EVC’s complete short publications – papers on scientific topics for the most part – which were bound together in volumes at his request. EVC’s many monographic works and collaborative volumes under single titles are cataloged and stored separately from the collection, but citations to these works may be found in Series 1.

Cowdry, E. V. (Edmund Vincent)

Frank R. Bradley Papers

  • FC024
  • Collection
  • 1914-1973

The Frank R. Bradley Papers cover the years from 1914 to shortly before his death and consist of nine series. A history of Barnes Hospital by Dr. Bradley is an important series in this collection. He died before completing his final revision of the manuscript. Also of interest is the series on the development and use of the airline-style food services for patients at Barnes Hospital. Dr. Bradley and Henrietta Becker, administrative dietician at Barnes, adapted the hot and cold food cases used to serve airline passengers for use in the hospital. This creative way to keep hot food hot and cold food cold and to control food handling and portion size through greater use of a central food preparation area aroused the interest of hospital administrators and dietitians nationwide. Bradley needed a form letter to reply to all those eager for information about the new-style food service.

Bradley, Frank R.

Mildred Trotter Oral History (OH009)

  • OH009
  • Collection
  • 5/19/1972

Trotter discusses her interest in anatomy and the events leading her to joining the faculty of the Washington University School of Medicine department of Anatomy. She recounts several events in the history of the department and its heads over the years, including Robert J. Terry, Edmund V. Cowdry, and Edward Dempsey. Trotter describes serving as an anthropologist in Hawaii identifying skeletal remains after the Second World War, changes in the study and teaching of anatomy, and teaching for a year at Makerere University College in Kampala, Uganda. She also discusses changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over the course of her career as well as sex discrimination in salaries and promotion at the university. The transcript combines two conversations between Mildred Trotter and Estelle Brodman recorded in May, 1972. The transcript was edited in 1985 by Paul G. Anderson to present events of Dr. Trotter's life in chronological order. Emendations of Dr. Trotter's remarks are indicated by words or passages enclosed in brackets. The audio quality of the original sound recording is poor. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 19, 1972 and May 23, 1972. OH009. Approximate Length 37 leaves (40 minutes.)

Trotter, Mildred, 1899-1991

Harry Agress Oral History

  • OH054
  • Collection
  • 4/22/1982

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 22, 1982. OH054. Approximate Length: 93 minutes.

Agress, Harry

Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • OH023
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

Percy J. Carroll Oral History

  • OH028
  • Collection
  • 2/23/1981

Carroll recounts his service in the Army Medical Corps from 1916 to 1946: service in France during World War I; postings to the Philippines, China, Jefferson Barracks; medical service with the Civilian Conservation Corps during the early years of the Depression; medical service in the South Pacific during World War II; contacts with Douglas McArthur. Also covered are Carroll’s post-war experiences as dean of the Creighton University School of Medicine.

Audio quality is very poor in parts of the first 90 minutes of the interview. Carroll’s wife Helen occasionally speaks during the interview. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on February 23, 1981 and March 4, 1981. OH028. Approximate Length 3 hours.

Carroll, Percy J.

Jerome E. Cook Oral History

  • OH063
  • Collection
  • 4/8/1961

Cook talks about Dr. Jesse S. Myer, gastroenterologist and biographer of William Beaumont. Cook also relates some of his experiences as a medical student in the early years of the 20th century and as an intern at St. Louis City Hospital. He describes the practice of medicine at that time and the prevalence and treatment of diseases such as typhoid fever, malaria, and syphilis.

There are several long pauses in the audio recording. Interviewed on April 8, 1961. OH063. Approximate Length 41 minutes.

Cook, Jerome E.

John C. Herweg Oral History (OH079)

  • OH079
  • Collection
  • March 2005

Candace O'Connor conducted the interview with John Herweg as part of her research in the history of the St. Louis Children’s Hospital for the hospital’s 125th anniversary publication. Approximate Length: 1 hour and 53 minutes.

O'Connor asked John Herweg to discuss his experiences at St. Louis Children's Hospital during the Alexis Hartmann era, 1936-early 1960s. As a medical student at Washington University in 1942-1945. he found the milieu at Children's Hospital was exciting, almost magical, because the medical and nursing staff were early adopters of each new antibiotic. Diagnosis was key in cures of children with meningitis and mastoiditis, who could be cured if caught in time. The pediatrician in-chief Alexis Hartmann Sr. and Jean Valjean cook provided guidance to the medical students in their sophomore, junior and senior years to save children’s lives.

Herwig reviews his experience as a student, intern, and resident of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of thrilling teachers such as Hartmann Sr. and Zebatine Hybias???? [Zentay?}. They knew medicine not only the laboratory aspects but clinical aspects. Hartmann brought patients and their mothers to the amphitheatre as well as the clinic where students saw clinical practice demonstrated. Herwig also rubbed shoulders with outstanding people who were research scientists besides the five research scientists, who were or were about to be Nobel Laureates including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, and Dr. Hershey in Bacterioiogy.

Hartmann insisted that Herweg stay for his internship and residency. Herwig was one of the bright medical students that Hartman recruited into pediatrics and nutured along. He helped them rise.

He mentions his first wife, Janet Scovill, who had finished her pediatric residency at Children’s (Which Children’s ) before him. [She died in 1958.} He also speaks of his present wife Dottie Glahn, who was head nurse of the infant ward at St. Louis Children’s Hospital from 1947-1959.

The interviewer asked him his recollections of Mrs. Langenberg, Gracie Jones and other women on women on the Board of Children’s hospital. He also briefly discussed interactions with Estelle Claiborne, the hospital administrator.

He recalls that World War II’s major effect on St. Louis Children’s Hospital was reduction of the number of house officers. The residents who were in charge of the hospital during the nighttime hours were consequently overworked.

The budget was very stringent at the end of the war. For example there were 2 glass syringes and they had to be autoclaved before use and they were in constant use. The staff cooled Patients were co by blowing a fan over a 50 pound cake of ice to make up for a lack of air conditioning.

Concerning the Butler Ward, the segregated ward for African-Americans, he admits the house officers might have integrated Children's Hospital earlier. He thought integration came about when Dave Golden called up Hartmann later and said he wanted to put an African patient on a ward by treatment needed rather than in the Butler ward. Hartmann agreed and Herwig thought that was the beginning of integration of St. Louis Chidlren's Hospital.

As to whether Hartmann sr. was prejudiced, Herweg didn't think so. He said Hartmann sr. had good relations with Helen and Homer Nash and later Alison Nash, Homer's daughter, at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. But he notes that Hartman wasn't an activist like Park White. He then recalls his impressions of Park White who he also admired.

Herweg, John C.

Oliver H. Lowry Oral History

  • OH012
  • Collection
  • 6/16/1972

Lowry discusses the life and work of Helen Tredway Graham, a member of the department of pharmacology of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1925-1971. Lowry discusses their work together studying histamines. The audio quality of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on June 16, 1972. OH012. Approximate Length 7 minutes.

Lowry, Oliver H.

Lawrence W. O'Neal Oral History

  • OH124
  • Collection
  • December 14, 2006

O'Neal shares his memories of medical school and instructors such as Evarts A. Graham; internship and residency at Barnes Hospital; and his career as a surgeon.

Transcription in progress. Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 2006. Approximate Length: 2 hours and 18 minutes.

O'Neal, Lawrence W.

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • FC126
  • Collection

Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Arpad I. Csapo Papers

  • FC038
  • Collection

Data files, selected short publications, laboratory notebooks and other laboratory records, lantern slides and other photographs on Csapo's research on the progesterone hormone in the physiology of uterine function and uterine muscle contractibility. These files contain data on drug effects of progesterone, estradiol, caffeine, steroids on the ovaries and uterus in humans, rabbits and mice. Later laboratory notebooks are in Series 1, Data, 1946-1979.

Csapo, Arpad I.

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