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Archival description
History, 20th century English
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Edward W. Dempsey Papers

  • FC115
  • Collection
  • 1958-1975

This collection consists of material mostly from the year 1964, which was the year when the dispute between the medical school and Edgar M. Queeny, speaking for the Barnes Hospital Trustees, reached a point when there was practically no area of the joint operation on which the two institutions could agree.

Material regarding Carl V. Moore’s appointment as the first Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs is included, as well as correspondence from M. Kenton King, Dr. Dempsey’s successor as Dean. The text of Dr. Dempsey’s resignation as Dean, his curriculum vitae and his obituary from 1975 are also included in the papers.

Dempsey, Edward W. (Edward Wheeler)

Joseph Erlanger Papers

  • FC001
  • Collection
  • 1890-1964

The collection consists of eight series. The attempt has been made to maintain the original order as much as possible, and particularly in the correspondence and scientific data series. Much of the material, however, was transmitted and accessioned in small portions in the years 1963-1966, and in some cases items were placed on display in the Library before being arranged in series. The microfilming, moreover, was carried out before the final arrangement and analysis of the collection could be made; somewhat premature filming decisions have, therefore, affected the final arrangement that is presented here and some items are missing or poorly described on the film.

Erlanger, Joseph

Samuel B. Guze Papers

  • FC065
  • Collection
  • 1946-2000

The Samuel B. Guze Papers are arranged in eleven organizational series. The bulk of this large collection is contained in Series 3 (General Files) and Series 5 (Manuscripts). Included in the Guze Papers are letters, journal articles, and handwritten notes. However, a significant portion of the collection consists of drafts of articles that Dr. Guze and his colleagues compiled for publication, as well as the corresponding data collection documents used for research and analysis. Especially noteworthy in the Guze Papers are the two oral histories taken with Dr. Guze, as well as his personal diary located in Series 10. For more detailed information regarding the content of this collection, see the individual series descriptions and container lists.

Guze, Samuel B.

Valentina Suntzeff Papers

  • FC020
  • Collection
  • 1911-1972

The majority of this collection is comprised of Dr. Suntzeff’s reprints. Also included in this collection are photographs and various items relating to her personal and professional life. Dr. Suntzeff’s autobiography (Series 4) is a particularly interesting piece that is very telling of her experiences as a female doctor both in Russia and the United States.

Suntzeff, Valentina

Ernest Sachs Reprints and Instruments

  • FC082
  • Collection
  • 1910-1929

Reprints of 41 scientific articles and 2 case reports authored or co-authored by Ernest Sachs. Subjects include neurosurgery, neuropathology, and neuroanatomy. Also includes three medical artifacts or instrument: .Hemocyctometer case with two glass pipettes for measuring white and red blood cells. Label on case reads “Blutkorperzahlapparat nach Thoma.” Manufactured by C. Zeiss, Jena; Wooden case containing 5 bone chisels manufactured by Louis & H. Loewenstei, Berlin; .

Sachs, Ernest

Beatrice F. Schulz Papers

  • FC150
  • Collection
  • 1926-1999

A collection relating to Beatrice Schulz’s schooling, career, her work as a consultant in Pakistan in 1967, and “historical material” on the Program in Physical Therapy at Washington University School of Medicine.  Photographs of former medical directors and program administrators, various group portraits from organizations to which Schulz belonged have been placed in the visual collection.  Various certificates have been retained with the collection.

Schulz, Beatrice F.

Henry G. Schwartz Papers

  • FC112
  • Collection
  • 1943-1986

The items in this collection represent different aspects of Dr. Schwartz’s personal and professional life. Series 1 (General Hospital 21) and Series 2 (Consultant in Neurosurgery, Vietnam) contain files relating to Dr. Schwartz’s military service. Another important segment of this collection is comprised of his lecture notes in Series 3. The remaining series include photographs, certificates, films and videotapes, memorabilia, and the many awards Dr. Schwartz received throughout his lifetime.

Schwartz, Henry G.

Mildred Trotter Papers

  • FC029
  • Collection

The Mildred Trotter papers group consists of fourteen series. The Trotter papers are rich in information not only about her fields of expertise, but about the School of Medicine in general and about opportunities for women in medical science during the first half of the twentieth century. Users are advised to consult Series 1 first, since it contains narrative memoirs that may serve to place her accomplishments in contexts of her own choosing.

Trotter, Mildred, 1899-1991

James L. O'Leary Papers

  • FC021
  • Collection
  • 1928-1975

O’Leary’s career illustrates the establishment of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine as a distinct medical discipline.  The O’Leary papers include correspondence, lectures, manuscripts, card files, photographs, certificates, and reprints of articles.  They document his work in many areas of neurological research, but particularly his investigations in the diagnosis and treatment of ataxia and epilepsy.  There is also significant material on O’Leary’s contributions to American Neurological Association, Epilepsy Association of America, Epilepsy Foundation of America, WUSM Administration, and WUSM Department of Neurology.

O'Leary, James L., 1904-1975

C. Barber Mueller Papers

  • FC144
  • Collection
  • 1917-2006

Curriculum vitae, 1997, and drafts and supporting materials on two of Mueller's projects on the history of medicine. For the history of McMaster University Medical School there is the draft of Part I. For the writing of Evarts A. Graham, the life, lives, and times of the surgical spirit of St. Louis (Hamilton, ON, 2002), there are interviews, notes, drafts, and other materials compiled. Of special interest are files containing original correspondence from various persons relating their memories of Graham. There is also an oral history of Frank R. Bradley by Peter D. Olch, original materials about Helen T. Graham and about Olch and his father I. Y. Olch.

Mueller, C. Barber

Philip Needleman Reprints

  • FC076
  • Collection
  • 1961-1986

Four bound volumes of Philip Needleman's scientific reprints, 1961-1986. Topics include the following: arachidonic acid metabolism in normal and pathological states, atrial peptides, organic nitrates and angiotensin antagonists. Philip Needleman's curriculum vitae is in the first volume (I, II)

Needleman, Philip

William B. Kountz Papers

  • FC045
  • Collection
  • 1924-1979

The Kountz papers are arranged in five short series, including one (Series 5) comprising correspondence received by his wife, Willie Mae Kountz, after his death. In general, the papers reflect to a significant extent Mrs. Kountz’s selections of materials to document her husband’s career. Included are correspondence, press clippings, and publications.

Kountz, William B.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • OH043
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH043. Approximate length 63 minutes.

Drews, Robert C.

Robert J. Glaser Oral History

  • OH062
  • Collection
  • 3/7/1985

Robert Glaser discusses his undergraduate and medical school experiences at Harvard University and his residency and years on the faculty as assistant and associate dean of the Washington University School of Medicine. Glaser explains his research in the uses of penicillin and his work in the rheumatic fever clinic during the late 1940s and 1950s. He also discusses some of his colleagues at Washington University, including Barry Wood, Robert A. Moore, Evarts A. Graham, and Carl Moore. Glaser discusses his experience serving as dean of the medical schools at Colorado and Stanford universities, and his work as a foundation executive of the Commonwealth Fund, the Kaiser Foundation and the Markey Charitable Trust. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on March 7, 1985. OH062. Approximate Length 130 minutes.

Glaser, Robert J.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH066)

  • OH066
  • Collection
  • 1994

Guze discusses his experience as a student of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of faculty members such as Carl and Gerty Cori, Mildred Trotter, Ethel Ronzoni Bishop, Joseph Erlanger, Barry Wood, Evarts A. Graham, Helen Tredway Graham, Sarah Luse, and Carl Moore. Guze explains how his interest in the field of psychiatry developed and the influence of George Saslow on his career. He also discusses building the psychiatry program at Washington University with his colleagues Eli Robins and George Winokur, his work on the genetics of psychiatric disorders, and the interest and development of child psychiatry as a discipline within the medical school. Colleagues such as M. Kenton King. Virginia Weldon, Paula J. Clayton, Lee Robins, and James Anthony are discussed. This oral history consists of a series of seven interviews conducted in 1994. The interviews were transcribed and edited by the interviewer, Marion Hunt, in 1994. The transcription was corrected and annotated by the interviewee in 1995. Interviewed by Marion Hunt in 1994. OH066. Approximate Length 49 leaves.

Guze, Samuel B.

Viktor Hamburger Oral History

  • OH067
  • Collection
  • 6/30/1983

Viktor Hamburger discusses major points in his long career as an embryologist – his early work in Germany with Hans Spemann and the study of the organizer effect; his experience coming to the United States in 1932 as a Rockefeller fellow and staying on after Hitler’s “cleansing of the professions” in Germany; joining the faculty of Washington University and his research there. Hamburger talks about his colleagues such as Rita Levi-Montalcini and their discovery of naturally occurring neuronal death, his work with Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen on the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF), and his study of animal behavior development and motility. Interviewed by Dale Purves, M.D. on June 30, 1983. OH067. Approximate Length 80 minutes.

Hamburger, Viktor

David E. Kennell Oral History

  • OH005
  • Collection
  • 11/25/1969

Kennell recounts the participation of the St. Louis Doctors for Peace in the nationwide Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam held on October 15, 1969 at the Washington University School of Medicine. The audio quality of the last 40 seconds of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on November 25, 1969. OH005. Approximate Length 18 minutes.

Kennell, David E.

Ruth Silberberg Oral History

  • OH020
  • Collection
  • 1/16/1976

Silberberg discusses differences in medical education in Europe and the United States. She also discusses changes in the field of pathology in general and in the Department of Pathology at the Washington University School of Medicine over the course of her career. Changes due to the development of electron microscopy are recalled, as well as the difficulties Silberberg encountered working under dean of the medical school and head of the pathology department, Robert A. Moore. Silberberg talks of leaving Germany because of the rise of Nazism and her husband and her coming to St. Louis to work in with Leo Loeb. She also describes her research in growth and aging, the study of osteoarthritis, and the relation of diabetes and joint disease. Sound level of audio recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on January 16, 1976. OH020. Approximate Length 53 minutes.

Silberberg, Ruth

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • OH033
  • Collection
  • 5/17/1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care. Audio quality of interview is poor. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 17, 1977. OH033. Approximate Length 32 minutes.

Stewart, Frances H.

Arthur E. Strauss Oral History

  • OH076
  • Collection
  • 9/18/1959

Strauss begins by discussing otolaryngologist Hanau W. Loeb and his role in the early history of St. Louis University Medical School and the development of Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. While relating being called in to help treat Loeb, Strauss discusses his training as a cardiologist and describes the first electrocardiograms. He relates his experiences leading up to his service in World War I and his experiences during the war working as a cardiologist in England and France. Strauss recalls returning to St. Louis after the war and his subsequent work as head of the cardiac clinic at Washington University and at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Strauss talks about his interactions with several prominent early physicians and cardiologists, including Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and James McKenzie. The conversation returns to the discussion of Hanau Loeb, and Strauss reads a published tribute to Loeb written by prominent St. Louis rabbi Leon Harrison. Strauss recalls two men who influenced him in his career as a physician, Jesse S. Myer and Albert E. Taussig. The interviewers and Strauss then talk about generational changes in medical training and practice, including the lack of exposure to medical “greats” and the lack of respect shown by local hospital house staffs. Some of the audio recording is distorted (at approximately 71 minutes in); the volume of the recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Gerhard E. Gruenfeld and Barrett L. Taussig on September 18, 1959. OH076. Approximate Length 147 minutes.

Strauss, Arthur E.

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