Showing 152 results

Archival description
Oral History
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

Benjamin Milder Oral History

  • OH118
  • Collection
  • November 9, 2006

In his 2006 oral history, Milder discusses growing up in St. Louis and his career as an ophthalmologist. He reminisces about his classmates and professors at medical school, the history of the practice of ophthalmology in St. Louis, and talks about some of his published books.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 2006. Approximate Length: 4 hours and 42 minutes.

Milder, Benjamin

Michael M. Karl Oral History

  • OH106
  • Collection
  • July 24, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 11 minutes.

The interview asked about the desegregation of Barnes Hospital and the elimination of the 0400 ward.

Karl, Michael M.

Robert Hickock Oral History

  • OH081
  • Collection
  • July 28, 2005

Hickock discusses his experiences in the Washington University School of Medicine's Program in Physical Therapy. Transcription in progress.

Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 45 minutes.

Hickok, Robert J.

Virgil Loeb, Jr. Oral History

  • OH072
  • Collection
  • April 2003

Transcript consists of interview notes taken while researching an article on three faculty members - Mildred Trotter, Ernie Sachs, and Carl Moore - at the Washington University School of Medicine. Loeb comments about all three, relating stories about them as teachers and colleagues.

Interviewed by Candace O'Connor in 2003.

Loeb, Virgil, Jr.

Lawrence W. O'Neal Oral History

  • OH124
  • Collection
  • December 14, 2006

O'Neal shares his memories of medical school and instructors such as Evarts A. Graham; internship and residency at Barnes Hospital; and his career as a surgeon.

Transcription in progress. Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 2006. Approximate Length: 2 hours and 18 minutes.

O'Neal, Lawrence W.

H. Mitchell Perry Oral History

  • OH074
  • Collection
  • December 16, 1997

Perry discusses his experiences as a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital, his career as a faculty member at WUSM, and his research in hypertension and stroke.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson and Dr. Mabel Purkerson in 1997. Approximate Length: 6 hours.

Perry, H. Mitchell

Helen E. Nash Oral History

  • OH073
  • Collection
  • 4/20/1999

Nash discusses growing up in Atlanta as the child of a successful African-American physician father and music teacher mother. She relates some of her experiences attending Meharry Medical College in the early 1940s and coming to St. Louis for her internship and residency at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. Nash discusses establishing and running a successful solo pediatric practice and the racism and sexism she faced during her professional career. She also discusses her mentor, Park J. White, and some of their experiences fighting segregation in medical care in St. Louis. Interviewed by Marion Hunt on April 20, 1999. OH073. Approximate Length 71 minutes.

Nash, Helen E.

Oliver H. Lowry Oral History

  • OH012
  • Collection
  • 6/16/1972

Lowry discusses the life and work of Helen Tredway Graham, a member of the department of pharmacology of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1925-1971. Lowry discusses their work together studying histamines. The audio quality of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on June 16, 1972. OH012. Approximate Length 7 minutes.

Lowry, Oliver H.

Estelle Brodman Oral History (OH052)

  • OH052
  • Collection
  • 1981-05-10

Dr. Brodman explains how she came to enter medical librarianship and the School of Library Service at Columbia University. She describes her early professional experiences at the Cornell University Nursing School Library, the main library of Columbia University and its medical library. There is a section on Dr. Brodman’s experiences at the Army Medical Library—National Library of Medicine from 1949 to 1961 and the changes during that period. Dr. Brodman discusses the history of the Medical Library Association and its relationship with the National Library of Medicine. She also details her involvement in the MLA – as editor of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association, the development of the MLA Oral History Project, and her term as president and on various committees. Brodman discusses her decision to leave the National Library of Medicine and come to the Washington University School of Medicine Library in 1961 and her 20 years there. In addition, Brodman discusses her experiences serving as a consultant nationally and internationally, and changes in medical librarianship over the course of her long career.

Part 1 of interview is approximately 3 hours long; part 2 is approximately 2 hours long. The audio quality of the interview is inconsistent.

Brodman, Estelle

Estelle Brodman Oral History (OH039)

  • OH039
  • Collection
  • November 22, 1978

Dr. Brodman explains her pursuit of a degree in Library Science, her two years at Columbia University, and her early career in the Medical Library Association. Dr. Brodman then discusses her career at the National Library of Medicine and the differences between the Army Medical Library of the 1940s and the National Library of Medicine of the 1970s. She mentions the development of MEDLARS and GRACE and the demise of the Index Catalog. Dr. Brodman tells of coming to Washington University School of Medicine Library and changes in libraries over the decades. The several interviewers next respond to Dr. Brodman’s questions about the changes in the Washington University School of Medicine Library. The interview ends with Estelle Brodman’s statement on how fulfilling and exciting medical librarianship has been for her.

Interviewed by Audrey K. Berteau, Loretta Stucki , Barbara Halbrook, Mrs. Betty Kulifay, and Millard Johnson

Brodman, Estelle

George H. Bishop Oral History

  • OH004
  • Collection
  • 11/24/1969

Bishop discusses his collaboration with Drs. Joseph Erlanger and Herbert Spencer Gasser on the properties of nerve fibers as recorded on the oscilloscope in the early 1920s at the Washington University School of Medicine. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on November 24, 1969. OH004. Approximate Length 10 minutes.

Bishop, George H.

E. V. Cowdry Oral History (OH008)

  • OH008
  • Collection

In the first interview Cowdry describes his early days at the Peking Union Medical College, established by the Rockefeller Foundation in China, from 1917 to 1921. He describes the state of medical education and practice of medicine in China at that time. The second interview concerns the 15th Japan Medical Congress in March-April, 1959 and the work of Dr. H. Marvin Pollard and his survey of Japanese teaching hospitals.

Interviewed by Walter W. Walker in 1969. Approximate Length: 90 minutes.

Cowdry, E. V. (Edmund Vincent)

Virginia Minnich Oral History

  • OH029
  • Collection
  • 3/25/1981

Minnich discusses her undergraduate studies at Ohio State University and her graduate studies at Iowa State College. She describes research work in college on serum iron metabolism, done with Carl V. Moore, and his later offer of employment as a researcher at the Washington University School of Medicine in 1938. Minnich details some of her research on iron metabolism, anemias and purpura, as well as her work setting up laboratories in Thailand and Turkey. She also discusses her work creating audio-visual teaching aids, teaching evening classes, and changes in the Washington University School of Medicine over her 40-plus year career. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on March 25, 1981. OH029. Approximate Length 77 minutes.

Minnich, Virginia

David E. Kennell Oral History

  • OH005
  • Collection
  • 11/25/1969

Kennell recounts the participation of the St. Louis Doctors for Peace in the nationwide Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam held on October 15, 1969 at the Washington University School of Medicine. The audio quality of the last 40 seconds of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on November 25, 1969. OH005. Approximate Length 18 minutes.

Kennell, David E.

Franklin E. Walton Oral History

  • OH015
  • Collection
  • March 11, 1975

Walton discusses his experiences as a student and faculty member of the Washington University School of Medicine; notable colleagues such as Evarts A. Graham; his experiences during the Second World War; and his work at Barnes Hospital.

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1975. Approximate Length: 6 hours and 46 minutes.

Walton, Franklin E., 1902-1981

Hallowell Davis Oral History

  • OH027
  • Collection
  • 4/6/1977

These interviews begin with Davis’s studies at Harvard and his post-graduate study in England. Davis discusses his research on the electrophysiology of the auditory system and electrical activity of the brain and his defense work during World War II studying human tolerance to loud sounds. Davis describes the establishment of a research department at the Central Institute for the Deaf and work on hearing tests and speech audiometry, including the development of the first American standards for audiometers. Davis describes then-current methods in electro-physiology to measure peripheral hearing of young children by detecting electrical responses in the brain. The interview ends with a brief discussion of the problems related to world overpopulation, pollution, and international relations.

The transcript presents an edited version of the sound recording. The interview begins with a biographical sketch of Hallowell Davis, and ends with a revised biographical sketch. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on April 6, 1977 and April 28, 1977. OH027. Approximate Length 2 hours, 45 minutes.

Davis, Hallowell, 1896-1992

Richard W. Hudgens Oral History

  • OH049
  • Collection
  • 4/28/1981

Hudgens relates some of his experiences as a student at WUSM in the 1950s and some of his influential professors, such as Edward Dempsey, Carl Moore, George Saslow, and Sam Guze. Hudgens also discusses the development of his interest in psychiatry, his medical residencies in Virginia and North Carolina, his experiences as a staff psychiatrist at the U.S. Air Force Hospital at Lackland AFB in Texas, and his experiences on the faculty and in the administration of the Washington University School of Medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 28, 1981. OH049. Approximate Length 59 minutes.

Hudgens, Richard W.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH065)

  • OH065
  • Collection
  • October 11, 1989

Interviewed by Richard W. Hudgens in 1989.

This is a five part interview on the history of the Neuropsychiatry department and the psychiatry department of Washington University School of Medicine. Part 1 begins with questions on the neuropsychiatry department in World War II beginning with Edward Gildea. He was a proponent of biological psychiatry, but was tolerant of the psychoanalysts on staff like his wife Margaret Gildea. Guze discusses the dynamic between the biologically oriented faculty Gildea appointed such as George Saslow, Eli Robins and George Winokur and himself. He also mentions George Ulett and David Graham. Guze explains how he got into psychiatry, when his initial goal was to be an internist. He also describes in the end of part 1 and beginning of part 2 how in 1955, Guze, Robins and Winokur, the three assistant professor in Psychiatry in 1955 went to Gildea with their plan for a biologically oriented psychiatry department. Gildea was supportive and they divided up duties. In the training of students, biological psychiatry emphasizes diagnosis and research, clinical studies of etiology including neuropathology, pharmacology, and neurochemistry. Eli Robins was the prime mover in the movement on regularizing diagnostic criteria. At the end of part 2, Guze discusses Gildeas strengths and weaknesses and is asked about Gildea's conflict with James O'Leary. Guze is asked how Eli Robins became head of the new Psychiatry Department. Dr. Ulett was also a contender for department chair. in part 3, Guze discusses Robins era and the effect of Eli's multiple sclerosis on his own research and the psychiatry department. In part 5, Guze discusses how he met Joy Guze, his wife and his childhood especially parents and grandparents and schooling. Antisemitic quotas affected admission to medical schools particularly before World War II.

Guze, Samuel B.

Arthur E. Strauss Oral History

  • OH076
  • Collection
  • 9/18/1959

Strauss begins by discussing otolaryngologist Hanau W. Loeb and his role in the early history of St. Louis University Medical School and the development of Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. While relating being called in to help treat Loeb, Strauss discusses his training as a cardiologist and describes the first electrocardiograms. He relates his experiences leading up to his service in World War I and his experiences during the war working as a cardiologist in England and France. Strauss recalls returning to St. Louis after the war and his subsequent work as head of the cardiac clinic at Washington University and at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Strauss talks about his interactions with several prominent early physicians and cardiologists, including Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and James McKenzie. The conversation returns to the discussion of Hanau Loeb, and Strauss reads a published tribute to Loeb written by prominent St. Louis rabbi Leon Harrison. Strauss recalls two men who influenced him in his career as a physician, Jesse S. Myer and Albert E. Taussig. The interviewers and Strauss then talk about generational changes in medical training and practice, including the lack of exposure to medical “greats” and the lack of respect shown by local hospital house staffs. Some of the audio recording is distorted (at approximately 71 minutes in); the volume of the recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Gerhard E. Gruenfeld and Barrett L. Taussig on September 18, 1959. OH076. Approximate Length 147 minutes.

Strauss, Arthur E.

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

In his oral history interview, Jones discusses some of his experiences as a medical officer during World War I. He also recalls some of the changes he witnessed over the years in the field of neurology and at the Washington University School of Medicine. Jones recalls some of his colleagues, such as Vilray P. Blair, George Dock, Ernest Sachs, and Sidney Schwab.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes. Grace Jones (Mrs. Andrew B. Jones) was also present and spoke during the interview.

Jones, Andrew B.

Results 1 to 20 of 152