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History, 20th century
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Margaret Gladys Smith Papers

  • FC013
  • Collection
  • 1932-1970

The Margaret G. Smith Papers have been organized into seven organizational series. The majority of these files include items relating to her work in the Pathology Department at the Washington University School of Medicine. Noteworthy are Dr. Smith’s twenty-nine scientific notebooks in Series 1 as well as the files in Series 4 regarding Dr. Smith’s work on the St. Louis encephalitis outbreaks.

Smith, Margaret G.

William M. Landau Papers

  • FC119
  • Collection
  • 1951-2010

Accession 2017-037: William M. Landau Papers (FC119): 8 record cartons and 5 oversized framed items. Box 1-2, personal and professional correspondence, circa 1980-2010, Box 3, framed items, videos and audio recordings of lectures, Boxes 4-8 scientific equipment from Landau's and George Bishop's laboratories.

This small collection includes a few transcripts of speeches given by Dr. Landau at various meetings, reprints, and documentation regarding Dr. Landau’s role in PNHP in Missouri (Physicians for a National Health Program).  See also oral history numbers OH090 and OH107 for Dr. Landau's oral histories.

Landau, William M.

Lee N. Robins Papers

  • FC142
  • Collection
  • 1958-2002

The Lee Robins Papers consist of twelve organizational series on Lee Robins' research and her family.  The research studies (Series 1) and Interview schedules (Series 2) are the most noteworthy materials and the bulk of the collection.   Also included are family and professional photographs (Series 5), a full set of journal articles (Series 3), and her correspondence (Series 6-8) and manuscripts (Series 4) from her retirement.  Noteworthy in the biographical series (Series 9-10) are the SCRD oral history interviews with Lee Robins (also online) and typed interviews for a biography of Eli Robins.

Robins, Lee N.

Harry Agress Oral History

  • OH054
  • Collection
  • 4/22/1982

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 22, 1982. OH054. Approximate Length: 93 minutes.

Agress, Harry

Harry Agress Oral History

  • FC133
  • Collection
  • 4/22/1982

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis.

Agress, Harry

Percy J. Carroll Oral History

  • PC075
  • Collection
  • 1981-02-23

See oral history number OH028.

Carroll recounts his service in the Army Medical Corps from 1916 to 1946: service in France during World War I; postings to the Philippines, China, Jefferson Barracks; medical service with the Civilian Conservation Corps during the early years of the Depression; medical service in the South Pacific during World War II; contacts with Douglas McArthur. Also covered are Carroll’s post-war experiences as dean of the Creighton University School of Medicine.

Carroll, Percy J.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • OH043
  • Collection
  • 5/8/1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on May 8, 1980. OH043. Approximate length 63 minutes.

Drews, Robert C.

Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • PC073
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

See oral history number OH023.

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • OH026
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1976

The three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 24, 1976. OH026. Approximate Length 87 minutes.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • FC123
  • Collection
  • 1976

In this oral history, the three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • OH023
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

Percy J. Carroll Oral History

  • OH028
  • Collection
  • 2/23/1981

Carroll recounts his service in the Army Medical Corps from 1916 to 1946: service in France during World War I; postings to the Philippines, China, Jefferson Barracks; medical service with the Civilian Conservation Corps during the early years of the Depression; medical service in the South Pacific during World War II; contacts with Douglas McArthur. Also covered are Carroll’s post-war experiences as dean of the Creighton University School of Medicine.

Audio quality is very poor in parts of the first 90 minutes of the interview. Carroll’s wife Helen occasionally speaks during the interview. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on February 23, 1981 and March 4, 1981. OH028. Approximate Length 3 hours.

Carroll, Percy J.

Eugene J. Bribach Oral History

  • OH019
  • Collection
  • 10/8/1975

Bribach discusses his experiences in medical school and his later studies in medicine in Germany. He also comments on some of his instructors, such as Robert J. Terry; classmates, such as Sherwood Moore; and his medical internship at St. Louis City Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on October 8, 1975. OH019. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Bribach, Eugene J.

Herbert A. Anderson Oral History

  • PC072
  • Collection
  • 1976-05-13

Transcript of Oral History number OH022.

Anderson discusses his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and some of his instructors, including Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs. Anderson also details his experiences as senior medical officer on a hospital transport ship during World War II and his continuing study of abdominal surgery at the Allgemeine Krankenhaus at the University of Vienna. Interviewed by Darryl B. Podoll on May 13 , 1976. OH022. Approximate Length 41 minutes.

Anderson, Herbert A., Jr.

James Barrett Brown Papers

  • FC118
  • Collection
  • 1931-1945

Correspondence of James Barrett Brown, Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, while chief of plastic surgery at the Valley Forge General Hospital, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, 1943-1945. Also contains files of photographs of patients illustrating treatments. The collection includes 20 reprints, dating from 1931 to 1942.

Brown, James Barrett

James Moores Ball Papers

  • PC040
  • Collection
  • 1894-1928

The collection contains mostly correspondence and reprints, but also included are newspaper and journal clippings, manuscripts of lectures, and papers on ophthalmology and the history of medicine.

Ball, James Moores

National University of Arts and Sciences documents, 1913-1915.

Exactly why the backers of Barnes University chose in 1912 to rename their institution National University of Arts and Sciences is unknown, although it is possible to speculate that whereas construction of the (totally unrelated) Barnes Hospital was by then underway, the hospital trustees perhaps asserted claims to exclusive rights to the Barnes name. National University established an undergraduate college in 1913, with courses initially offered in the medical building, then in 1915 moved to a structure at Grand and Delmar Boulevards. The institution attempted as well to operate a preparatory academy. After Christian Hospital withdrew from administration of the former Centenary structure, what was left of the inpatient facility was renamed National Hospital. Also in 1915, a merger was announced between the medical department and the St. Louis College of Physician and Surgeons, another financially beleaguered independent school. This arrangement failed, however, with Physicians and Surgeons withdrawing its faculty and students in 1916. That year witnessed the end of all the National departments but medicine. In 1918 the last medical class graduated and National’s clinical facilities ceased to treat patients.

National University of Arts and Sciences, St. Louis, Missouri

Barnes Medical College or University bulletins, 1900-1912.

Barnes Medical College was organized in 1892 as a for-profit venture by a group of physicians and business leaders and named in honor of a recently deceased merchant, Robert A. Barnes (1808-1892). Barnes had bequeathed money for the construction of a hospital and it has been widely presumed that the educators’ choice of name was part of an attempt to secure an affiliation between the two institutions. If so, the attempt failed, for the trustees of the Robert A. Barnes estate chose instead to reinvest the assets and wait for a more favorable time to build Barnes Hospital. Ignoring the rebuff, the college trustees constructed a building of their own at 2645 Chestnut (later renamed Lawton) Street. The institution quickly became the largest medical college in the city (ca. 400 students) and its program outgrew the original structure. In 1896 a second building opened two blocks west, on Lawson at Garrison Avenue. In 1902 the objective of a college-related clinical facility was achieved with the establishment of Centenary Hospital and the Barnes Dispensary in a new adjoining building. The institution also operated a dental college (see below), a college of pharmacy, and a nurses’ training program. At its height, the college enrolled approximately 600 students, and in 1904 changed its name to Barnes University. Despite these enhancements and changes of name, it became increasing apparent that the institution was financially unstable. The trustees offered their properties to the Curators of the University of Missouri in 1906 to house the state medical college. The negotiations lasted over a year and the Curators came close to accepting what seemed at first to be a generous offer. In the end, however, the state refused to pay the private venture’s debts and plans for the connection collapsed in 1908. During this same period, Barnes did absorb a smaller private school, the Hippocratean College of Medicine. Flexner severely criticized the Barnes institutions in 1909, however, a contemporary reviewer writing for the American Medical Association (Philip Skrainka, 1910) judged their quality “good.” One year following the merger with American Medical College in 1911 the names Barnes ceased to refer to medical instruction by this organization. For a brief period (1911-1914?) the Centenary facility was administered by Christian Hospital. From 1919 until 1936 the city of St. Louis used the building as a hospital for African American patients (City Hospital No. 2). The structures at Garrison and Lawton were demolished in 1960.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

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