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Archival description
Saint Louis (Mo.) History, 20th century
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Eugene J. Bribach Oral History

  • OH019
  • Collection
  • 10/8/1975

Bribach discusses his experiences in medical school and his later studies in medicine in Germany. He also comments on some of his instructors, such as Robert J. Terry; classmates, such as Sherwood Moore; and his medical internship at St. Louis City Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on October 8, 1975. OH019. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Bribach, Eugene J.

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

In his oral history interview, Jones discusses some of his experiences as a medical officer during World War I. He also recalls some of the changes he witnessed over the years in the field of neurology and at the Washington University School of Medicine. Jones recalls some of his colleagues, such as Vilray P. Blair, George Dock, Ernest Sachs, and Sidney Schwab.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes. Grace Jones (Mrs. Andrew B. Jones) was also present and spoke during the interview.

Jones, Andrew B.

George H. Bishop Papers

  • FC033
  • Collection
  • 1915-1978

Much of this collection was assembled by Louise H. Marshall, formerly of Washington University and later of the University of California, Los Angeles. Mrs. Marshall used materials related to Dr. Bishop that she had personally collected, as well as items supplied by her husband, Wade Marshall, and by Dr. Bishop’s brother, Frederick Bishop. All of these materials were placed together with items that had been kept in the Department of Neurology after Dr. Bishop’s death. Included in the collection are correspondence, manuscripts, notes, diagrams, and various ephemera. All photographs and many of the drawings in this collection were separated from the written documents and placed in a visual collection (VC034). The resulting arrangement reflects the mixed provenance and the many hands that have contributed to the collection. It is important to underscore that although Dr. Bishop himself never saw these collections as bibliographic entities, they were assembled in good faith that the effort would help to preserve the memory of this important scientist.

Bishop, George H.

Philip A. Shaffer Papers

  • FC005
  • Collection
  • 1910-1958

The Shaffer papers include ten document series including correspondence, diaries, scrapbooks, short publications, notes, and his Ph.D. dissertation. Major subjects are his research work in biochemistry and the administration of WUSM as dean and head of the Department of Biological Chemistry. His work with Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Children’s Hospital, American Society of Biological Chemists and the U. S. Army in World War I are also subjects.

In 2006, this collection contained many deteriorated brittle carbon copies on newsprint and newspaper clippings that chipped or fractured with minimal handling. The acidic newsprint had stained surrounding documents and was losing contrast due to browning. Archives staff made acid-free photocopies to preserve content and contrast for future use and preservation microfilming.

Shaffer, Philip A.

Viktor Hamburger Oral History

  • FC132
  • Collection
  • June 30, 1983

Hamburger discusses major points in his long career as an embryologist – his early work in Germany with Hans Spemann and the study of the organizer effect; his experience coming to the United States in 1932 as a Rockefeller fellow and staying on after Hitler’s “cleansing of the professions” in Germany; joining the faculty of Washington University and his research there. Hamburger talks about his colleagues such as Rita Levi-Montalcini and their discovery of naturally occurring neuronal death, his work with Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen on the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF), and his study of animal behavior development and motility.

Hamburger, Viktor

Oliver H. Lowry Oral History

  • FC137
  • Collection
  • June 16, 1972

Lowry discusses the life and work of Helen Tredway Graham, a member of the department of pharmacology of the Washington University School of Medicine from 1925-1971. Lowry discusses their work together studying histamines.

Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on June 16, 1972. 7 minutes

Lowry, Oliver H.

Lawrence W. O'Neal Papers

  • FC145
  • Collection
  • 1952-2002

Files pertaining to "Mission to Thailand," ("Our Heritage" series, St. Louis Metropolitan Medicine, 2002, July,:2001). They include 2002 letters from Ben Eiseman and Frank Vellios. The letters contain their reminiscences of Washington University program in Thailand in the early 1950s as part of the Medical Education Exchange Program. Documents from 1952 Dean's correspondence are a controversial "Coronet" magazine article on Eiseman, March 1952 and Robert A. Moore's report on medical education in Thailand.

O'Neal, Lawrence W.

Henry G. Schwartz Photographs

  • VC102
  • Collection
  • 1931-1985

This collection consists of 85 photographs documenting the personal and professional life of Henry G. Schwartz. Many of the images in the collection are digital surrogates of the the original photographs that primarily depict scenes with Schwartz and other men and women serving as United States Army officers in World War II. Additional digital images depict two young boys playing outside and posing on the steps of a house. The other photographs in the collection are primarily portraits of friends and colleagues of Schwartz, including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, Ernest Sachs, Sidney I. Schwab, and Evarts A. Graham. Those photographs (VC102069-084) are also arranged and described as Series 5 in the Henry G. Schwartz Papers (FC112).

Schwartz, Henry G.

Henry L. Ettman Papers

  • PC003
  • Collection
  • 1941-1968

This collection includes 4 series.  Much of the documention included in each of the series details how to operate various medical equipment.  Note that Series 1: Correspondence; Series 2, Micromanipulator; and Series 3: Knife Sharpener and Stropper are available on microfilm only.  Series 4, the scrapbook is available in both microfilm and hardcopy format.

Ettman, Henry L.

Joseph C. Hinsey Collection

  • PC020
  • Collection
  • 1979-1981

The collection contains letters from Joseph C. Hinsey to Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Hunt, William Dock, and others. Hinsey’s address at Joseph Erlanger’s memorial service is included.

Hinsey, Joseph C.

Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity Records

  • PC050
  • Collection
  • 1905-1957

The record group concerns the selection of medical students for the society and the development of the local chapter. The records list many members who became prominent in their fields. The Alpha Omega Alpha fraternity records consist of three volumes, 1905-1957, that include the initial charter and constitution and by-laws, minutes of chapter meetings, treasury records, chapter membership lists, other by-laws, correspondence, and publications. See also the The Hatchet (1923-1931) and the Archives vertical file (1938-1992) for more information on this student organization.

Alpha Omega Alpha. Alpha of Missouri Chapter

Barnes Medical College or University bulletins, 1900-1912.

Barnes Medical College was organized in 1892 as a for-profit venture by a group of physicians and business leaders and named in honor of a recently deceased merchant, Robert A. Barnes (1808-1892). Barnes had bequeathed money for the construction of a hospital and it has been widely presumed that the educators’ choice of name was part of an attempt to secure an affiliation between the two institutions. If so, the attempt failed, for the trustees of the Robert A. Barnes estate chose instead to reinvest the assets and wait for a more favorable time to build Barnes Hospital. Ignoring the rebuff, the college trustees constructed a building of their own at 2645 Chestnut (later renamed Lawton) Street. The institution quickly became the largest medical college in the city (ca. 400 students) and its program outgrew the original structure. In 1896 a second building opened two blocks west, on Lawson at Garrison Avenue. In 1902 the objective of a college-related clinical facility was achieved with the establishment of Centenary Hospital and the Barnes Dispensary in a new adjoining building. The institution also operated a dental college (see below), a college of pharmacy, and a nurses’ training program. At its height, the college enrolled approximately 600 students, and in 1904 changed its name to Barnes University. Despite these enhancements and changes of name, it became increasing apparent that the institution was financially unstable. The trustees offered their properties to the Curators of the University of Missouri in 1906 to house the state medical college. The negotiations lasted over a year and the Curators came close to accepting what seemed at first to be a generous offer. In the end, however, the state refused to pay the private venture’s debts and plans for the connection collapsed in 1908. During this same period, Barnes did absorb a smaller private school, the Hippocratean College of Medicine. Flexner severely criticized the Barnes institutions in 1909, however, a contemporary reviewer writing for the American Medical Association (Philip Skrainka, 1910) judged their quality “good.” One year following the merger with American Medical College in 1911 the names Barnes ceased to refer to medical instruction by this organization. For a brief period (1911-1914?) the Centenary facility was administered by Christian Hospital. From 1919 until 1936 the city of St. Louis used the building as a hospital for African American patients (City Hospital No. 2). The structures at Garrison and Lawton were demolished in 1960.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

National University of Arts and Sciences documents, 1913-1915.

Exactly why the backers of Barnes University chose in 1912 to rename their institution National University of Arts and Sciences is unknown, although it is possible to speculate that whereas construction of the (totally unrelated) Barnes Hospital was by then underway, the hospital trustees perhaps asserted claims to exclusive rights to the Barnes name. National University established an undergraduate college in 1913, with courses initially offered in the medical building, then in 1915 moved to a structure at Grand and Delmar Boulevards. The institution attempted as well to operate a preparatory academy. After Christian Hospital withdrew from administration of the former Centenary structure, what was left of the inpatient facility was renamed National Hospital. Also in 1915, a merger was announced between the medical department and the St. Louis College of Physician and Surgeons, another financially beleaguered independent school. This arrangement failed, however, with Physicians and Surgeons withdrawing its faculty and students in 1916. That year witnessed the end of all the National departments but medicine. In 1918 the last medical class graduated and National’s clinical facilities ceased to treat patients.

National University of Arts and Sciences, St. Louis, Missouri

James Moores Ball Papers

  • PC040
  • Collection
  • 1894-1928

The collection contains mostly correspondence and reprints, but also included are newspaper and journal clippings, manuscripts of lectures, and papers on ophthalmology and the history of medicine.

Ball, James Moores

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