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Education, Medical English
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Sidney I. Schwab Lecture Notes

  • FC044
  • Collection
  • 1892-1896

This collection consists of manuscript lecture notes by Sidney I. Schwab from classes that he took at Harvard Medical School, 1892-1896. There are six volumes in the collection: 1. Legal Medicine by Dr. Draper, 1895-1896; 2. Dermatology, 1894-1895; 3. Neurology, 1895-1896; 4. Theory & Practice, 1894-1895; 5. Clinical Medicine [by] Dr. Shattuck, Dr. Mason; Clinical Surgery [by] Dr. Porter, 1895; 6. Lab Sketches, 1892-1893.

Schwab, Sidney I.

Charles L. Sherman, Barnes Medical College Artifacts

  • VC210
  • Collection
  • 1896-1901

This collection consists of 22 artifacts pertaining to the matriculation of Charles L. Sherman at Barnes Medical College, 1896-1901. The collection includes a scholarship certificate, lecture schedule pamphlet, course cards and matriculation tickets, and a leather wallet that originally held the academic cards.

Sherman, Charles L.

Barnes Medical College Gross Anatomy Instruction Photographs

  • VC060
  • Collection
  • 1894-1906

This collection consists of 12 photographs and 1 diploma related to Barnes Medical College. The photographs primarily depict Gross Anatomy students and their dissected cadavers. Other depicted subjects include exterior views of Barnes Medical College, interior views of the Barnes Dental College Infirmary, group portraits of Barnes Medical College students, and a Doctor of Medicine diploma from Barnes Medical College awarded to Charles DeWitt Hibbetts.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

Barnes Medical College or University bulletins, 1900-1912.

Barnes Medical College was organized in 1892 as a for-profit venture by a group of physicians and business leaders and named in honor of a recently deceased merchant, Robert A. Barnes (1808-1892). Barnes had bequeathed money for the construction of a hospital and it has been widely presumed that the educators’ choice of name was part of an attempt to secure an affiliation between the two institutions. If so, the attempt failed, for the trustees of the Robert A. Barnes estate chose instead to reinvest the assets and wait for a more favorable time to build Barnes Hospital. Ignoring the rebuff, the college trustees constructed a building of their own at 2645 Chestnut (later renamed Lawton) Street. The institution quickly became the largest medical college in the city (ca. 400 students) and its program outgrew the original structure. In 1896 a second building opened two blocks west, on Lawson at Garrison Avenue. In 1902 the objective of a college-related clinical facility was achieved with the establishment of Centenary Hospital and the Barnes Dispensary in a new adjoining building. The institution also operated a dental college (see below), a college of pharmacy, and a nurses’ training program. At its height, the college enrolled approximately 600 students, and in 1904 changed its name to Barnes University. Despite these enhancements and changes of name, it became increasing apparent that the institution was financially unstable. The trustees offered their properties to the Curators of the University of Missouri in 1906 to house the state medical college. The negotiations lasted over a year and the Curators came close to accepting what seemed at first to be a generous offer. In the end, however, the state refused to pay the private venture’s debts and plans for the connection collapsed in 1908. During this same period, Barnes did absorb a smaller private school, the Hippocratean College of Medicine. Flexner severely criticized the Barnes institutions in 1909, however, a contemporary reviewer writing for the American Medical Association (Philip Skrainka, 1910) judged their quality “good.” One year following the merger with American Medical College in 1911 the names Barnes ceased to refer to medical instruction by this organization. For a brief period (1911-1914?) the Centenary facility was administered by Christian Hospital. From 1919 until 1936 the city of St. Louis used the building as a hospital for African American patients (City Hospital No. 2). The structures at Garrison and Lawton were demolished in 1960.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

Leonard Berg Papers

  • FC035
  • Collection
  • 1946-1948

This small collection comprises a number of Dr. Berg’s notebooks.  They include his typed and handwritten notes on topics such as anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, and pharmacology.  Of particular note is the “Guide to the Study of Neurology” (Box 2, Folder 4) which was produced by the WUSM Department of Anatomy, but includes notes and drawings added by Berg.

Berg, Leonard

C. Read Boles Papers

  • FC153
  • Collection
  • 1951

Files and personal correspondence pertaining to Mission to Thailand, June-August 1951.

Boles, C. Read

Evarts A. Graham Photographs

  • VC029
  • Collection
  • 1920-1957

This collection consists of 166 photographs and glass lantern slides depicting the professional life of Evarts A. Graham. Primarily the photographs depict portraits of Graham, as well as various scenes of Graham lecturing to students, performing surgery, working with patients, and with colleagues at dinners or conferences.The collection also includes Barnes Hospital Surgical Staff photographs, interior views of Graham's office taken just after his death, and photographs sent to Graham from former students. The glass slides in the collection primarily depict demonstrations of a postural drainage table in various positions, and chest x-rays and microscopic views of lung tissue from Dr. James Gilmore.

Graham, Evarts A. (Evarts Ambrose), 1883-1957

Eugene J. Bribach Oral History

  • PC074
  • Collection
  • 1975-10-08

See oral history number OH019.

Bribach discusses his experiences in medical school and his later studies in medicine in Germany. He also comments on some of his instructors, such as Robert J. Terry; classmates, such as Sherwood Moore; and his medical internship at St. Louis City Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on October 8, 1975. OH019. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Bribach, Eugene J.

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • FC123
  • Collection
  • 1976

In this oral history, the three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • PC073
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

See oral history number OH023.

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • FC131
  • Collection
  • 1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care.

Stewart, Frances H.

Robert C. Drews, Miles C. Whitener, and August W. Geise Oral History

  • FC125
  • Collection
  • May 8, 1980

Drews, Whitener and Geise reflect back on their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1950s and the value of rotating rather than specialized internships. The three physicians discuss some of the memorable faculty members, such as Mildred Trotter, Carl Moyer, Oliver Lowry, and Carl Moore. They also discuss technological and pharmacological changes over the years that have affected the practice of medicine.

Drews, Robert C.

Harry Agress Oral History

  • FC133
  • Collection
  • 4/22/1982

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis.

Agress, Harry

Carl F. Cori Papers

  • FC050
  • Collection
  • 1919-1984

This collection is comprised mostly of Dr. Cori's personal and professional correspondence, although a few series contain materials relating to his research.

Cori, Carl F.

Henry G. Schwartz Photographs

  • VC102
  • Collection
  • 1931-1985

This collection consists of 85 photographs documenting the personal and professional life of Henry G. Schwartz. Many of the images in the collection are digital surrogates of the the original photographs that primarily depict scenes with Schwartz and other men and women serving as United States Army officers in World War II. Additional digital images depict two young boys playing outside and posing on the steps of a house. The other photographs in the collection are primarily portraits of friends and colleagues of Schwartz, including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, Ernest Sachs, Sidney I. Schwab, and Evarts A. Graham. Those photographs (VC102069-084) are also arranged and described as Series 5 in the Henry G. Schwartz Papers (FC112).

Schwartz, Henry G.

Virgil Loeb, Jr. Class of 1944 Slides

  • VC104
  • Collection
  • 1944-1985

This collection consists of ninety-five 35mm slides, including some duplicated or variant images, produced from archival and private sources for a show honoring the Class of 1944, 1993-94. Many of the images are duplicates of those found in other visual collections.

Loeb, Virgil, Jr.

Samuel B. Guze Oral History (OH066)

  • OH066
  • Collection
  • 1994

Guze discusses his experience as a student of the Washington University School of Medicine in the early 1940s, and his memories of faculty members such as Carl and Gerty Cori, Mildred Trotter, Ethel Ronzoni Bishop, Joseph Erlanger, Barry Wood, Evarts A. Graham, Helen Tredway Graham, Sarah Luse, and Carl Moore. Guze explains how his interest in the field of psychiatry developed and the influence of George Saslow on his career. He also discusses building the psychiatry program at Washington University with his colleagues Eli Robins and George Winokur, his work on the genetics of psychiatric disorders, and the interest and development of child psychiatry as a discipline within the medical school. Colleagues such as M. Kenton King. Virginia Weldon, Paula J. Clayton, Lee Robins, and James Anthony are discussed. This oral history consists of a series of seven interviews conducted in 1994. The interviews were transcribed and edited by the interviewer, Marion Hunt, in 1994. The transcription was corrected and annotated by the interviewee in 1995. Interviewed by Marion Hunt in 1994. OH066. Approximate Length 49 leaves.

Guze, Samuel B.

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