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Barnes Medical College or University bulletins, 1900-1912.

Barnes Medical College was organized in 1892 as a for-profit venture by a group of physicians and business leaders and named in honor of a recently deceased merchant, Robert A. Barnes (1808-1892). Barnes had bequeathed money for the construction of a hospital and it has been widely presumed that the educators’ choice of name was part of an attempt to secure an affiliation between the two institutions. If so, the attempt failed, for the trustees of the Robert A. Barnes estate chose instead to reinvest the assets and wait for a more favorable time to build Barnes Hospital. Ignoring the rebuff, the college trustees constructed a building of their own at 2645 Chestnut (later renamed Lawton) Street. The institution quickly became the largest medical college in the city (ca. 400 students) and its program outgrew the original structure. In 1896 a second building opened two blocks west, on Lawson at Garrison Avenue. In 1902 the objective of a college-related clinical facility was achieved with the establishment of Centenary Hospital and the Barnes Dispensary in a new adjoining building. The institution also operated a dental college (see below), a college of pharmacy, and a nurses’ training program. At its height, the college enrolled approximately 600 students, and in 1904 changed its name to Barnes University. Despite these enhancements and changes of name, it became increasing apparent that the institution was financially unstable. The trustees offered their properties to the Curators of the University of Missouri in 1906 to house the state medical college. The negotiations lasted over a year and the Curators came close to accepting what seemed at first to be a generous offer. In the end, however, the state refused to pay the private venture’s debts and plans for the connection collapsed in 1908. During this same period, Barnes did absorb a smaller private school, the Hippocratean College of Medicine. Flexner severely criticized the Barnes institutions in 1909, however, a contemporary reviewer writing for the American Medical Association (Philip Skrainka, 1910) judged their quality “good.” One year following the merger with American Medical College in 1911 the names Barnes ceased to refer to medical instruction by this organization. For a brief period (1911-1914?) the Centenary facility was administered by Christian Hospital. From 1919 until 1936 the city of St. Louis used the building as a hospital for African American patients (City Hospital No. 2). The structures at Garrison and Lawton were demolished in 1960.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

Barnes Medical College Gross Anatomy Instruction Photographs

  • VC060
  • Collection
  • 1894-1906

This collection consists of 12 photographs and 1 diploma related to Barnes Medical College. The photographs primarily depict Gross Anatomy students and their dissected cadavers. Other depicted subjects include exterior views of Barnes Medical College, interior views of the Barnes Dental College Infirmary, group portraits of Barnes Medical College students, and a Doctor of Medicine diploma from Barnes Medical College awarded to Charles DeWitt Hibbetts.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

Charles L. Sherman, Barnes Medical College Artifacts

  • VC210
  • Collection
  • 1896-1901

This collection consists of 22 artifacts pertaining to the matriculation of Charles L. Sherman at Barnes Medical College, 1896-1901. The collection includes a scholarship certificate, lecture schedule pamphlet, course cards and matriculation tickets, and a leather wallet that originally held the academic cards.

Sherman, Charles L.

C. Read Boles Papers

  • FC153
  • Collection
  • 1951

Files and personal correspondence pertaining to Mission to Thailand, June-August 1951.

Boles, C. Read

Lawrence W. O'Neal Papers

  • FC145
  • Collection
  • 1952-2002

Files pertaining to "Mission to Thailand," ("Our Heritage" series, St. Louis Metropolitan Medicine, 2002, July,:2001). They include 2002 letters from Ben Eiseman and Frank Vellios. The letters contain their reminiscences of Washington University program in Thailand in the early 1950s as part of the Medical Education Exchange Program. Documents from 1952 Dean's correspondence are a controversial "Coronet" magazine article on Eiseman, March 1952 and Robert A. Moore's report on medical education in Thailand.

O'Neal, Lawrence W.

Virgil Loeb, Jr. Class of 1944 Slides

  • VC104
  • Collection
  • 1944-1985

This collection consists of ninety-five 35mm slides, including some duplicated or variant images, produced from archival and private sources for a show honoring the Class of 1944, 1993-94. Many of the images are duplicates of those found in other visual collections.

Loeb, Virgil, Jr.

H. Mitchell Perry Oral History

  • OH074
  • Collection
  • December 16, 1997

Perry discusses his experiences as a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital, his career as a faculty member at WUSM, and his research in hypertension and stroke.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson and Dr. Mabel Purkerson in 1997. Approximate Length: 6 hours.

Perry, H. Mitchell

E. V. Cowdry Oral History (OH008)

  • OH008
  • Collection

In the first interview Cowdry describes his early days at the Peking Union Medical College, established by the Rockefeller Foundation in China, from 1917 to 1921. He describes the state of medical education and practice of medicine in China at that time. The second interview concerns the 15th Japan Medical Congress in March-April, 1959 and the work of Dr. H. Marvin Pollard and his survey of Japanese teaching hospitals.

Interviewed by Walter W. Walker in 1969. Approximate Length: 90 minutes.

Cowdry, E. V. (Edmund Vincent)

Henry G. Schwartz Photographs

  • VC102
  • Collection
  • 1931-1985

This collection consists of 85 photographs documenting the personal and professional life of Henry G. Schwartz. Many of the images in the collection are digital surrogates of the the original photographs that primarily depict scenes with Schwartz and other men and women serving as United States Army officers in World War II. Additional digital images depict two young boys playing outside and posing on the steps of a house. The other photographs in the collection are primarily portraits of friends and colleagues of Schwartz, including Carl and Gerty Cori, Joseph Erlanger, Ernest Sachs, Sidney I. Schwab, and Evarts A. Graham. Those photographs (VC102069-084) are also arranged and described as Series 5 in the Henry G. Schwartz Papers (FC112).

Schwartz, Henry G.

Franklin E. Walton Oral History

  • OH015
  • Collection
  • March 11, 1975

Walton discusses his experiences as a student and faculty member of the Washington University School of Medicine; notable colleagues such as Evarts A. Graham; his experiences during the Second World War; and his work at Barnes Hospital.

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1975. Approximate Length: 6 hours and 46 minutes.

Walton, Franklin E., 1902-1981

Leonard Berg Papers

  • FC035
  • Collection
  • 1946-1948

This small collection comprises a number of Dr. Berg’s notebooks.  They include his typed and handwritten notes on topics such as anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, and pharmacology.  Of particular note is the “Guide to the Study of Neurology” (Box 2, Folder 4) which was produced by the WUSM Department of Anatomy, but includes notes and drawings added by Berg.

Berg, Leonard

Kenneth M. Ludmerer Papers

  • FC066
  • Collection
  • 1978-1998

Prospectus and manuscripts for "Time to Heal" and three notebooks compiled by Ludmerer as house officer at Barnes Hospital, June 23 to December 28, 1978 concerning patients in his care (Confidential materials: name of patients may not be duplicated or divulged by users of collection).

Ludmerer, Kenneth M.

Sidney I. Schwab Lecture Notes

  • FC044
  • Collection
  • 1892-1896

This collection consists of manuscript lecture notes by Sidney I. Schwab from classes that he took at Harvard Medical School, 1892-1896. There are six volumes in the collection: 1. Legal Medicine by Dr. Draper, 1895-1896; 2. Dermatology, 1894-1895; 3. Neurology, 1895-1896; 4. Theory & Practice, 1894-1895; 5. Clinical Medicine [by] Dr. Shattuck, Dr. Mason; Clinical Surgery [by] Dr. Porter, 1895; 6. Lab Sketches, 1892-1893.

Schwab, Sidney I.

Eli Robins Papers

  • FC077
  • Collection
  • 1947-1994

The Eli Robins papers are arranged in twenty-seven organizational series on the administration of the Psychiatry Department from 1962-1975 and the research of the Eli Robins labs.  The bulk of the collection is in the General Correspondence files (Series 4), General files (Series 5), Associations and Societies (Series 6), and Laboratory Notebooks and Records (Series 19).  Included in the Robins papers are letters, a complete set of Journal articles (Series 1), and handwritten notes. In addition, there are drafts of articles that Dr. Robins and members of his lab compiled for publication and corresponding data collection documents used for research and analysis.

Robins, Eli

Joseph C. Hinsey Collection

  • PC020
  • Collection
  • 1979-1981

The collection contains letters from Joseph C. Hinsey to Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Hunt, William Dock, and others. Hinsey’s address at Joseph Erlanger’s memorial service is included.

Hinsey, Joseph C.

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

In his oral history interview, Jones discusses some of his experiences as a medical officer during World War I. He also recalls some of the changes he witnessed over the years in the field of neurology and at the Washington University School of Medicine. Jones recalls some of his colleagues, such as Vilray P. Blair, George Dock, Ernest Sachs, and Sidney Schwab.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes. Grace Jones (Mrs. Andrew B. Jones) was also present and spoke during the interview.

Jones, Andrew B.

Harry Agress Oral History

  • FC133
  • Collection

Agress discusses his medical studies at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Mo.) and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.); his service in World War II with the U.S. Army, 21st General Hospital, in Algeria, Italy, and France; and his civilian practice in St. Louis as a physician and pathologist. He speaks about some of his professors and colleagues, including Evarts A. Graham, Ernest Sachs, and Lee D. Cady, and some of his experiences at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis.

Agress, Harry

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