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Education, Medical
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Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • PC073
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

See oral history number OH023.

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • OH023
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • OH026
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1976

The three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 24, 1976. OH026. Approximate Length 87 minutes.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • FC123
  • Collection
  • 1976

In this oral history, the three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

Andrew B. Jones Oral History

  • OH046
  • Collection
  • October 10, 1980

In his oral history interview, Jones discusses some of his experiences as a medical officer during World War I. He also recalls some of the changes he witnessed over the years in the field of neurology and at the Washington University School of Medicine. Jones recalls some of his colleagues, such as Vilray P. Blair, George Dock, Ernest Sachs, and Sidney Schwab.

Interviewed by Paul Anderson in 1980. Approximate Length: 53 minutes. Grace Jones (Mrs. Andrew B. Jones) was also present and spoke during the interview.

Jones, Andrew B.

Barnes Medical College Gross Anatomy Instruction Photographs

  • VC060
  • Collection
  • 1894-1906

This collection consists of 12 photographs and 1 diploma related to Barnes Medical College. The photographs primarily depict Gross Anatomy students and their dissected cadavers. Other depicted subjects include exterior views of Barnes Medical College, interior views of the Barnes Dental College Infirmary, group portraits of Barnes Medical College students, and a Doctor of Medicine diploma from Barnes Medical College awarded to Charles DeWitt Hibbetts.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

Barnes Medical College or University bulletins, 1900-1912.

Barnes Medical College was organized in 1892 as a for-profit venture by a group of physicians and business leaders and named in honor of a recently deceased merchant, Robert A. Barnes (1808-1892). Barnes had bequeathed money for the construction of a hospital and it has been widely presumed that the educators’ choice of name was part of an attempt to secure an affiliation between the two institutions. If so, the attempt failed, for the trustees of the Robert A. Barnes estate chose instead to reinvest the assets and wait for a more favorable time to build Barnes Hospital. Ignoring the rebuff, the college trustees constructed a building of their own at 2645 Chestnut (later renamed Lawton) Street. The institution quickly became the largest medical college in the city (ca. 400 students) and its program outgrew the original structure. In 1896 a second building opened two blocks west, on Lawson at Garrison Avenue. In 1902 the objective of a college-related clinical facility was achieved with the establishment of Centenary Hospital and the Barnes Dispensary in a new adjoining building. The institution also operated a dental college (see below), a college of pharmacy, and a nurses’ training program. At its height, the college enrolled approximately 600 students, and in 1904 changed its name to Barnes University. Despite these enhancements and changes of name, it became increasing apparent that the institution was financially unstable. The trustees offered their properties to the Curators of the University of Missouri in 1906 to house the state medical college. The negotiations lasted over a year and the Curators came close to accepting what seemed at first to be a generous offer. In the end, however, the state refused to pay the private venture’s debts and plans for the connection collapsed in 1908. During this same period, Barnes did absorb a smaller private school, the Hippocratean College of Medicine. Flexner severely criticized the Barnes institutions in 1909, however, a contemporary reviewer writing for the American Medical Association (Philip Skrainka, 1910) judged their quality “good.” One year following the merger with American Medical College in 1911 the names Barnes ceased to refer to medical instruction by this organization. For a brief period (1911-1914?) the Centenary facility was administered by Christian Hospital. From 1919 until 1936 the city of St. Louis used the building as a hospital for African American patients (City Hospital No. 2). The structures at Garrison and Lawton were demolished in 1960.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

Bernard Becker Oral History

  • OH061
  • Collection
  • 10/19/1990

Transcript of 3 interviews with Bernard Becker conducted in the fall of 1990. In the first interview Becker describes his early years and education. He discusses his undergraduate studies at Princeton University and his mentor there, H. S. Taylor; his graduate studies at Harvard Medical School during World War II and his military service as a psychiatrist; and his post-war residency training and research with Jonas Friedenwald at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. In the second interview Becker describes the challenges of balancing clinical work, research, and administration as head of the Department of Ophthalmology at Washington University School of Medicine from 1953 to 1988. Becker discusses the expansion of the Department of Ophthalmology, his research in the causes and control of glaucoma, and his efforts to integrate the university’s affiliated hospitals. In the third interview, Becker describes the changes in academic medicine and research from the 1950s to the 1980s. He discusses some of the efforts leading to the establishment of the National Eye Institute in 1968, and his work to fund and construct a new medical library at Washington University. Following the 3rd interview is Dr. Becker's summary of his career. Interviewed by Marion Hunt on October 19, 1990; November 2, 1990, and unknown date [Fall 1990]. OH061. Approximate Length 30 leaves.

Becker, Bernard

C. Read Boles Papers

  • FC153
  • Collection
  • 1951

Files and personal correspondence pertaining to Mission to Thailand, June-August 1951.

Boles, C. Read

Carl F. Cori Papers

  • FC050
  • Collection
  • 1919-1984

This collection is comprised mostly of Dr. Cori's personal and professional correspondence, although a few series contain materials relating to his research.

Cori, Carl F.

Charles L. Sherman, Barnes Medical College Artifacts

  • VC210
  • Collection
  • 1896-1901

This collection consists of 22 artifacts pertaining to the matriculation of Charles L. Sherman at Barnes Medical College, 1896-1901. The collection includes a scholarship certificate, lecture schedule pamphlet, course cards and matriculation tickets, and a leather wallet that originally held the academic cards.

Sherman, Charles L.

E. V. Cowdry Oral History (OH008)

  • OH008
  • Collection

In the first interview Cowdry describes his early days at the Peking Union Medical College, established by the Rockefeller Foundation in China, from 1917 to 1921. He describes the state of medical education and practice of medicine in China at that time. The second interview concerns the 15th Japan Medical Congress in March-April, 1959 and the work of Dr. H. Marvin Pollard and his survey of Japanese teaching hospitals.

Interviewed by Walter W. Walker in 1969. Approximate Length: 90 minutes.

Cowdry, E. V. (Edmund Vincent)

Eli Robins Papers

  • FC077
  • Collection
  • 1947-1994

The Eli Robins papers are arranged in twenty-seven organizational series on the administration of the Psychiatry Department from 1962-1975 and the research of the Eli Robins labs.  The bulk of the collection is in the General Correspondence files (Series 4), General files (Series 5), Associations and Societies (Series 6), and Laboratory Notebooks and Records (Series 19).  Included in the Robins papers are letters, a complete set of Journal articles (Series 1), and handwritten notes. In addition, there are drafts of articles that Dr. Robins and members of his lab compiled for publication and corresponding data collection documents used for research and analysis.

Robins, Eli

Eugene J. Bribach Oral History

  • OH019
  • Collection
  • 10/8/1975

Bribach discusses his experiences in medical school and his later studies in medicine in Germany. He also comments on some of his instructors, such as Robert J. Terry; classmates, such as Sherwood Moore; and his medical internship at St. Louis City Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on October 8, 1975. OH019. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Bribach, Eugene J.

Eugene J. Bribach Oral History

  • PC074
  • Collection
  • 1975-10-08

See oral history number OH019.

Bribach discusses his experiences in medical school and his later studies in medicine in Germany. He also comments on some of his instructors, such as Robert J. Terry; classmates, such as Sherwood Moore; and his medical internship at St. Louis City Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on October 8, 1975. OH019. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Bribach, Eugene J.

Evarts A. Graham Photographs

  • VC029
  • Collection
  • 1920-1957

This collection consists of 166 photographs and glass lantern slides depicting the professional life of Evarts A. Graham. Primarily the photographs depict portraits of Graham, as well as various scenes of Graham lecturing to students, performing surgery, working with patients, and with colleagues at dinners or conferences.The collection also includes Barnes Hospital Surgical Staff photographs, interior views of Graham's office taken just after his death, and photographs sent to Graham from former students. The glass slides in the collection primarily depict demonstrations of a postural drainage table in various positions, and chest x-rays and microscopic views of lung tissue from Dr. James Gilmore.

Graham, Evarts A. (Evarts Ambrose), 1883-1957

Frances Stewart Oral History

  • OH033
  • Collection
  • 5/17/1977

Stewart briefly discusses her experiences in medical school at the Washington University School of Medicine, her remembrances of professor Ernest Sachs, and her internship at St. Louis Maternity Hospital. Stewart recounts the beginning of the first contraceptive clinic in St. Louis, the Maternal Health Association of Missouri (later Planned Parenthood of St. Louis), and some of its founders, Frederick J. Taussig, Robert J. Crossen, and Helen Buss. She also recalls her work at the clinic and its development over the years. The interview concluded with a discussion about problems with medical malpractice insurance and the rising cost of medical care. Audio quality of interview is poor. Interviewed by William R. Massa on May 17, 1977. OH033. Approximate Length 32 minutes.

Stewart, Frances H.

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