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Joseph Erlanger Photographs

  • VC027
  • Collection

This collection consists of 54 photographs and 2 postcards depicting the professional life and scientific achievements of Dr. Joseph Erlanger. Depicted subjects include formal portraits of Erlanger, scenes from a dinner hosted by President John F. and Jackie Kennedy at the White House for Nobel Laureates, studio views of Erlanger's Nobel Prize medal and certificate, and scenes from the presentation of Erlanger's papers to Washington University School of Medicine's Library in 1963.

Erlanger, Joseph

Herbert S. Gasser Papers

  • FC062
  • Collection
  • 1914-1964

Collection of Gasser's selected reprints, 1914-1927. Many of the scientific articles concern Gasser's work with Joseph Erlanger using a cathode-ray oscillograph to amplify and record electrical conduction, or action potentials, of nerves. Others are concerned with muscular contraction and the study and treatment of shock The collection also includes a bound copy of "Experimental Neurology," (Supplement 1, 1964) which contains Gasser's autobiographical memoir.

Gasser, Herbert S. (Herbert Spencer)

Arthur S. Gilson Oral History

  • OH047
  • Collection
  • 10/17/1980

Arthur Gilson discusses the research and activities of the Department of Physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and 1930s and several of his colleagues, such as Joseph Erlanger, Herbert Gasser, and George Bishop. He also talks of the axonologists, a discussion group first formed in 1930 at an American Physiological Society meeting. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on October 17, 1980. OH047. Approximate Length 39 minutes.

Gilson, Arthur S.

Hallowell Davis Oral History

  • OH027
  • Collection
  • 4/6/1977

These interviews begin with Davis’s studies at Harvard and his post-graduate study in England. Davis discusses his research on the electrophysiology of the auditory system and electrical activity of the brain and his defense work during World War II studying human tolerance to loud sounds. Davis describes the establishment of a research department at the Central Institute for the Deaf and work on hearing tests and speech audiometry, including the development of the first American standards for audiometers. Davis describes then-current methods in electro-physiology to measure peripheral hearing of young children by detecting electrical responses in the brain. The interview ends with a brief discussion of the problems related to world overpopulation, pollution, and international relations.

The transcript presents an edited version of the sound recording. The interview begins with a biographical sketch of Hallowell Davis, and ends with a revised biographical sketch. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on April 6, 1977 and April 28, 1977. OH027. Approximate Length 2 hours, 45 minutes.

Davis, Hallowell, 1896-1992