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Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • PC073
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

See oral history number OH023.

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

Adam N. Boyd Oral History

  • OH023
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Boyd recounts some of his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and his recollections of instructors such as Barney Brooks and David Barr. Also covered are some of Boyd’s experiences as a general practitioner in Houston, Texas, especially during the Depression. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on May 13, 1976. OH023. Approximate Length 54 minutes.

Boyd, Adam N.

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • OH026
  • Collection
  • 5/24/1976

The three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz. Interviewed by Estelle Brodman on May 24, 1976. OH026. Approximate Length 87 minutes.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

A.N. Arneson, John E. Hobbs, and Melvin A. Roblee Oral History

  • FC123
  • Collection
  • 1976

In this oral history, the three physicians discuss their experiences as students at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s; changes in medical practice and education during the 20th century; and changes in the study and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Arneson, Hobbs, and Roblee also relate stories about Barnes Hospital, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, surgeons Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs, physiologist Joseph Erlanger, and obstetricians Henry Schwarz and Otto Henry Schwarz.

Arneson, A.N. (Axel Norman)

Barnes Medical College or University bulletins, 1900-1912.

Barnes Medical College was organized in 1892 as a for-profit venture by a group of physicians and business leaders and named in honor of a recently deceased merchant, Robert A. Barnes (1808-1892). Barnes had bequeathed money for the construction of a hospital and it has been widely presumed that the educators’ choice of name was part of an attempt to secure an affiliation between the two institutions. If so, the attempt failed, for the trustees of the Robert A. Barnes estate chose instead to reinvest the assets and wait for a more favorable time to build Barnes Hospital. Ignoring the rebuff, the college trustees constructed a building of their own at 2645 Chestnut (later renamed Lawton) Street. The institution quickly became the largest medical college in the city (ca. 400 students) and its program outgrew the original structure. In 1896 a second building opened two blocks west, on Lawson at Garrison Avenue. In 1902 the objective of a college-related clinical facility was achieved with the establishment of Centenary Hospital and the Barnes Dispensary in a new adjoining building. The institution also operated a dental college (see below), a college of pharmacy, and a nurses’ training program. At its height, the college enrolled approximately 600 students, and in 1904 changed its name to Barnes University. Despite these enhancements and changes of name, it became increasing apparent that the institution was financially unstable. The trustees offered their properties to the Curators of the University of Missouri in 1906 to house the state medical college. The negotiations lasted over a year and the Curators came close to accepting what seemed at first to be a generous offer. In the end, however, the state refused to pay the private venture’s debts and plans for the connection collapsed in 1908. During this same period, Barnes did absorb a smaller private school, the Hippocratean College of Medicine. Flexner severely criticized the Barnes institutions in 1909, however, a contemporary reviewer writing for the American Medical Association (Philip Skrainka, 1910) judged their quality “good.” One year following the merger with American Medical College in 1911 the names Barnes ceased to refer to medical instruction by this organization. For a brief period (1911-1914?) the Centenary facility was administered by Christian Hospital. From 1919 until 1936 the city of St. Louis used the building as a hospital for African American patients (City Hospital No. 2). The structures at Garrison and Lawton were demolished in 1960.

Barnes Medical College, Saint Louis

Bernard Becker Oral History

  • OH061
  • Collection
  • 10/19/1990

Transcript of 3 interviews with Bernard Becker conducted in the fall of 1990. In the first interview Becker describes his early years and education. He discusses his undergraduate studies at Princeton University and his mentor there, H. S. Taylor; his graduate studies at Harvard Medical School during World War II and his military service as a psychiatrist; and his post-war residency training and research with Jonas Friedenwald at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. In the second interview Becker describes the challenges of balancing clinical work, research, and administration as head of the Department of Ophthalmology at Washington University School of Medicine from 1953 to 1988. Becker discusses the expansion of the Department of Ophthalmology, his research in the causes and control of glaucoma, and his efforts to integrate the university’s affiliated hospitals. In the third interview, Becker describes the changes in academic medicine and research from the 1950s to the 1980s. He discusses some of the efforts leading to the establishment of the National Eye Institute in 1968, and his work to fund and construct a new medical library at Washington University. Following the 3rd interview is Dr. Becker's summary of his career. Interviewed by Marion Hunt on October 19, 1990; November 2, 1990, and unknown date [Fall 1990]. OH061. Approximate Length 30 leaves.

Becker, Bernard

Charles L. Sherman, Barnes Medical College Artifacts

  • VC210
  • Collection
  • 1896-1901

This collection consists of 22 artifacts pertaining to the matriculation of Charles L. Sherman at Barnes Medical College, 1896-1901. The collection includes a scholarship certificate, lecture schedule pamphlet, course cards and matriculation tickets, and a leather wallet that originally held the academic cards.

Sherman, Charles L.

Edward W. Dempsey Papers

  • FC115
  • Collection
  • 1958-1975

This collection consists of material mostly from the year 1964, which was the year when the dispute between the medical school and Edgar M. Queeny, speaking for the Barnes Hospital Trustees, reached a point when there was practically no area of the joint operation on which the two institutions could agree.

Material regarding Carl V. Moore’s appointment as the first Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs is included, as well as correspondence from M. Kenton King, Dr. Dempsey’s successor as Dean. The text of Dr. Dempsey’s resignation as Dean, his curriculum vitae and his obituary from 1975 are also included in the papers.

Dempsey, Edward W. (Edward Wheeler)

Ethan A. H. Shepley Oral History

  • OH003
  • Collection
  • 10/23/1969

Shepley recounts the reorganization of the Washington University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals into WUMSAH (Washington University Medical School and Affiliated Hospitals). He discusses the conflict between the School of Medicine and the board of Barnes Hospitals, and the roles of the individuals involved in the formation of WUMSAH, including Edgar M. Queeny, Edward W. Dempsey, James S. McDonnell, and William H. Danforth. The audio quality of the interview is poor. Interviewed by Walter W. Walker on October 23, 1969. OH003. Approximate Length 30 minutes.

Shepley, Ethan A. H.

Ethan A. Shepley Oral History

  • FC130
  • Collection
  • 1969

Shepley recounts the reorganization of the Washington University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals into WUMSAH (Washington University Medical School and Affiliated Hospitals). He discusses the conflict between the School of Medicine and the board of Barnes Hospitals, and the roles of the individuals involved in the formation of WUMSAH, including Edgar M. Queeny, Edward W. Dempsey, James S. McDonnell, and William H. Danforth.

Shepley, Ethan A. H.

Eugene J. Bribach Oral History

  • OH019
  • Collection
  • 10/8/1975

Bribach discusses his experiences in medical school and his later studies in medicine in Germany. He also comments on some of his instructors, such as Robert J. Terry; classmates, such as Sherwood Moore; and his medical internship at St. Louis City Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on October 8, 1975. OH019. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Bribach, Eugene J.

Eugene J. Bribach Oral History

  • PC074
  • Collection
  • 1975-10-08

See oral history number OH019.

Bribach discusses his experiences in medical school and his later studies in medicine in Germany. He also comments on some of his instructors, such as Robert J. Terry; classmates, such as Sherwood Moore; and his medical internship at St. Louis City Hospital. Interviewed by Darryl Podoll on October 8, 1975. OH019. Approximate Length 90 minutes.

Bribach, Eugene J.

General Faculty Records

  • RG01B
  • Collection
  • 1911-1941

Minutes of meetings form the series. The finding aid is not complete.

General Faculty, Washington University School of Medicine

Gustav Baumgarten Lecture Card Facsimilies

  • VC157
  • Collection
  • 1853-1856

This collection consists of 24 facsimiles of course cards, order of lecture cards, and a matriculation card from Gustav Baumgarten's studies at St. Louis Medical College, and 1 membership card to the St. Louis Medical Society.

H. Rommel Hildreth Oral History

  • FC134
  • Collection
  • 8 April 1981

Hildreth discusses the dispute between the Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital in the early 1960s, and the roles of Edgar M. Queeny (chairman of the Trustees of Barnes Hospital), Edward W. Dempsey (dean of the medical school), consultants Joseph Hinsey and John H. Knowles, and Washington University chancellor George Pake. Hildreth also talks about some of the faculty of the medical school while he was a student in the mid-1920s, such as Evarts A. Graham and Joseph Erlanger.

Hildreth, H. Rommel

Herbert A. Anderson Oral History

  • OH022
  • Collection
  • 5/13/1976

Anderson discusses his experiences as a student at the Washington University School of Medicine in the 1920s and some of his instructors, including Evarts A. Graham and Ernest Sachs. Anderson also details his experiences as senior medical officer on a hospital transport ship during World War II and his continuing study of abdominal surgery at the Allgemeine Krankenhaus at the University of Vienna. Interviewed by Darryl B. Podoll on May 13 , 1976. OH022. Approximate Length 41 minutes.

Anderson, Herbert A., Jr.

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