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Segregation
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Frank O. Richards Papers

  • FC103
  • Collection
  • 1937-2003

The Frank O. Richards papers contains statistical and narrative pertaining primarily to Homer G. Phillips Hospital, the St. Louis municipal hospital founded and operated for African Americans in 1937, but also to two other institutions, City Hospital No. 2 and the Peoples’ Hospital, that treated black patients during decades of official racial segregation. Included are files on William H. Sinkler, medical director of Phillips Hospital from 1941 until 1960. The files in Box 1 in particular document the writing of his chapter, “The St. Louis Story,” in A Century of Black Surgeons. Box 2 contains later additions, notably an undergraduate thesis by Dean Lee Kolnick (2003) on Homer G. Phillips Hospital.

Richards, Frank O.

Frank O. Richards Photographs

  • VC243
  • Collection
  • 1919-1987

This collection consists of 63 Photographs, negatives and slides. The collection sonsists primarily of images of physicians, staff and structures of the Homer G. Phillips Hospital. The images were compiled by Frank O. Richards, M.D. as illustrations for his chapter "St. Louis Story - Homer G. Phillips Hospital," in: A Century of Black Surgeons: The U.S.A. Experience, ed. by Claude H. Organ and Margaret Kosiba (1987).

Richards, Frank O.

Helen E. Nash Oral History

  • OH073
  • Collection
  • 4/20/1999

Nash discusses growing up in Atlanta as the child of a successful African-American physician father and music teacher mother. She relates some of her experiences attending Meharry Medical College in the early 1940s and coming to St. Louis for her internship and residency at Homer G. Phillips Hospital. Nash discusses establishing and running a successful solo pediatric practice and the racism and sexism she faced during her professional career. She also discusses her mentor, Park J. White, and some of their experiences fighting segregation in medical care in St. Louis. Interviewed by Marion Hunt on April 20, 1999. OH073. Approximate Length 71 minutes.

Nash, Helen E.

Michael M. Karl Oral History

  • OH106
  • Collection
  • July 24, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey and associates, 1990. Approximate Length: 11 minutes.

The interview asked about the desegregation of Barnes Hospital and the elimination of the 0400 ward.

Karl, Michael M.

Richard W. Hudgens Oral History

  • OH049
  • Collection
  • 4/28/1981

Hudgens relates some of his experiences as a student at WUSM in the 1950s and some of his influential professors, such as Edward Dempsey, Carl Moore, George Saslow, and Sam Guze. Hudgens also discusses the development of his interest in psychiatry, his medical residencies in Virginia and North Carolina, his experiences as a staff psychiatrist at the U.S. Air Force Hospital at Lackland AFB in Texas, and his experiences on the faculty and in the administration of the Washington University School of Medicine. Interviewed by Paul G. Anderson on April 28, 1981. OH049. Approximate Length 59 minutes.

Hudgens, Richard W.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH107)

  • OH107
  • Collection
  • June 15, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey, James Carter, and William Guideman, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes. See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau discusses his experience with segregation in St. Louis as a child and as medical student, house officer, and resident at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine as background to the desegregation of hospitals and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He recalls the desegregation of Barnes Hospital was set in motion by David Goldring, Alexis Hartman Sr. and ? Park White trained African American pediatricians through his world class pediatric residency program at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in the 1940s. Park White also fought get black kids into St. Louis Children's Hospital and his own African American residents as medical staff. Landau recalls the first black medical student's admission in 1951 and his failure due in part to poor preparation but more significantly to a hostile environment. George Saslow, a psychiatrist and head of the outpatient clinic, was key in building a better environment for subsequent black applicants and students.

Landau, William M.