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Jerome E. Cook Papers

  • FC121
  • Collection
  • 1913-1918

This small collection contains letters to Cook from John H. Kennerly, Dean of the WU Dental School; Charles Rice, Secretary, The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis; and Philip A. Shaffer, Dean Washington University Medicine School, concerning Cook's ineligibility to service in the US Army Medical Corps due to the need of the Schools and Hospital to retain him for medical service, 1917. Also included is a handwritten draft of a letter, presumably by Cook, stating he is a conscientious objector and willing only to provide medical care to soliders unable to return to active duty, August 27, 1918. Includes a reprint of the article: Taussig, Albert E., and Jerome E. Cook. 'The Determination of the Diastolic Pressure in Aortic Regurgitation,' reprinted from the Archives of Internal Medicine, May 1913, v.11, p.542-550.

Cook, Jerome E.

Arthur E. Strauss Oral History

  • OH076
  • Collection
  • 9/18/1959

Strauss begins by discussing otolaryngologist Hanau W. Loeb and his role in the early history of St. Louis University Medical School and the development of Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. While relating being called in to help treat Loeb, Strauss discusses his training as a cardiologist and describes the first electrocardiograms. He relates his experiences leading up to his service in World War I and his experiences during the war working as a cardiologist in England and France. Strauss recalls returning to St. Louis after the war and his subsequent work as head of the cardiac clinic at Washington University and at the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis. Strauss talks about his interactions with several prominent early physicians and cardiologists, including Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and James McKenzie. The conversation returns to the discussion of Hanau Loeb, and Strauss reads a published tribute to Loeb written by prominent St. Louis rabbi Leon Harrison. Strauss recalls two men who influenced him in his career as a physician, Jesse S. Myer and Albert E. Taussig. The interviewers and Strauss then talk about generational changes in medical training and practice, including the lack of exposure to medical “greats” and the lack of respect shown by local hospital house staffs. Some of the audio recording is distorted (at approximately 71 minutes in); the volume of the recording is not consistent. Interviewed by Gerhard E. Gruenfeld and Barrett L. Taussig on September 18, 1959. OH076. Approximate Length 147 minutes.

Strauss, Arthur E.

David Goldring Papers

  • FC106
  • Collection
  • 1940-1992

The personal and professional papers of David Goldring contain two series.  The subject of Series 2 is the history of pediatric cardiology at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and Washington University in St. Louis. Series 1 is a subject file on the professional activities and research interests of David Goldring M.D. Contains: reprints, notes, letters, manuscripts, and various articles.

Goldring, David

William M. Landau Oral History (OH107)

  • OH107
  • Collection
  • June 15, 1990

An interview of the Washington University Medical Center Desegregation History Project, conducted by Edwin W. McCleskey, James Carter, and William Guideman, 1990. Approximate Length: 67 minutes. See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau discusses his experience with segregation in St. Louis as a child and as medical student, house officer, and resident at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine as background to the desegregation of hospitals and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He recalls the desegregation of Barnes Hospital was set in motion by David Goldring, Alexis Hartman Sr. and ? Park White trained African American pediatricians through his world class pediatric residency program at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in the 1940s. Park White also fought get black kids into St. Louis Children's Hospital and his own African American residents as medical staff. Landau recalls the first black medical student's admission in 1951 and his failure due in part to poor preparation but more significantly to a hostile environment. George Saslow, a psychiatrist and head of the outpatient clinic, was key in building a better environment for subsequent black applicants and students.

Landau, William M.

William M. Landau Oral History (OH090)

  • OH090
  • Collection
  • April 27, 2006

Landau discusses his experiences working with the Washington University School of Medicine's Program in Physical Therapy.
Interview conducted by Susan Deusinger of the Physical Therapy Department, WUSM. Approximate Length: 14 minutes.  See also the William M. Landau Papers (FC119).

Landau, William M.

William M. Landau Papers

  • FC119
  • Collection
  • 1951-2010

Accession 2017-037: William M. Landau Papers (FC119): 8 record cartons and 5 oversized framed items. Box 1-2, personal and professional correspondence, circa 1980-2010, Box 3, framed items, videos and audio recordings of lectures, Boxes 4-8 scientific equipment from Landau's and George Bishop's laboratories.

This small collection includes a few transcripts of speeches given by Dr. Landau at various meetings, reprints, and documentation regarding Dr. Landau’s role in PNHP in Missouri (Physicians for a National Health Program).  See also oral history numbers OH090 and OH107 for Dr. Landau's oral histories.

Landau, William M.

Morris Abrams Papers

  • FC117
  • Collection
  • 1940-1991

This small collection is comprised of records Dr. Abrams kept during his service in the U. S. Army from 1941-1945.

Abrams, Morris

Jessie L. Ternberg Oral History

  • OH034
  • Collection
  • May 8, 1978

Interviewed by Estelle Brodman in 1978. Approximate Length: 2 hours and 40 minutes.

Ternberg, Jessie L.

Jessie L. Ternberg Papers

  • FC116
  • Collection

Papers from Jesse Ternberg's office: FC116 (Jessie L. Ternberg Papers) : 3 boxes. Box 1: correspondence and photographs from Dr. Ternberg's office on the 5th floor of Saint Louis Children's Hospital. Chiefly photographs, snapshots and portraits, of her patients and their families. Many of the snapshots and patient photos are unidentified and have been discarded. Box 2: Includes Dr. Ternberg's white coat, Babinski reflex hammer, solid brass paperweight commemorating the dedication of SLCH 1984, SLCH nametag button, specially made eyeglasses with magnifying lenses, and surgical instruments including two spoon shaped instruments custom made for Dr. Ternberg. Box 3: Consists of hanging file folders of reprints of her publications.

FC116 (Jessie L. Ternberg Papers) also include 1) Remarks given at dinner marking the 75th anniversary of the first admission of women students to WUSM, October 8, 1993. 1 leaf and 2) Video recording of memorial tribute to Jessie Ternberg held on September 25, 2016 at the Missouri Botanical Garden. 1 hr, 17 min, 45 sec., MP4 format file, 2.79 GB. Recording begins with slide show of still images shown at the memorial, recording of speakers and music begins at 11 min, 54 sec mark, recording ends with still images taken at the reception held immediately following the memorial. Speakers include: Al Wiman, Richard Karl, Lorie M. L. Karnath, Timothy Eberlein, and Virginia V. Weldon. Musicians: David Halen and Kurt Pavitt. FC116-I001.mp4

Ternberg, Jessie L.

Edward W. Dempsey Papers

  • FC115
  • Collection
  • 1958-1975

This collection consists of material mostly from the year 1964, which was the year when the dispute between the medical school and Edgar M. Queeny, speaking for the Barnes Hospital Trustees, reached a point when there was practically no area of the joint operation on which the two institutions could agree.

Material regarding Carl V. Moore’s appointment as the first Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs is included, as well as correspondence from M. Kenton King, Dr. Dempsey’s successor as Dean. The text of Dr. Dempsey’s resignation as Dean, his curriculum vitae and his obituary from 1975 are also included in the papers.

Dempsey, Edward W. (Edward Wheeler)

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